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eBook Goodnight, Whatever You Are!: My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul ePub

by Richard Scrivani

eBook Goodnight, Whatever You Are!: My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul ePub
Author: Richard Scrivani
Language: English
ISBN: 1933384034
ISBN13: 978-1933384030
Publisher: Dinoship, Inc (December 25, 2006)
Pages: 300
Category: Arts & Literature
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 775
Formats: lit lrf txt rtf
ePub file: 1774 kb
Fb2 file: 1845 kb

GOODNIGHT WHATEVER YOU ARE?", is a well-written loving tribute to this wonderful very kind man. "The King Of Horror-Hosts," the Cool-Ghoul Zacherley! The author Richard Scrivani is good friends with Zacherley and he should be very proud of this WONDERFUL book!

GOODNIGHT WHATEVER YOU ARE?", is a well-written loving tribute to this wonderful very kind man. "The King Of Horror-Hosts," the Cool-Ghoul Zacherley! The author Richard Scrivani is good friends with Zacherley and he should be very proud of this WONDERFUL book! This VERY enjoyable book is jam-packed with valuable imformation about Zacherley's career, and stories. Richard's fascinating memories of being friends with Zach since 1965! I also enjoy the many rare and interesting photos with Zach, beautifully illustrated through-out the book!

Goodnight, Whatever You Are! book.

Goodnight, Whatever You Are! book. The first-ever in-depth look at the life and career of one of the great icons of 1950s-60s TV—Zacherley, television's first great 'horror host,' a pop phenomenon as important as Elvis or hula hoops. Learn how Zacherley became an institution, and trace his later career as an FM radio deejay, a guest on Saturday Night Live and star of TV commercials.

Richard Scrivani is the author of Goodnight, Whatever You Are! . Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Richard Scrivani's books. My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul.

Discover new books on Goodreads. Richard Scrivani’s Followers. None yet. Richard Scrivani. Richard Scrivani’s books. Goodnight, Whatever You Are!: My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul.

My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul. 1 person is interested in this title. We receive fewer than 1 copy every 6 months. Select Format: Paperback.

Goodnight, Whatever You Are! My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul. Published December 25, 2006 by Dinoship, Inc.

Learn how Zacherley became an institution, and trace his later career as an FM radio deejay, a guest on Saturday Night Live and star of TV commercials.

2006 saw release of the book, Goodnight, Whatever You Are!, by longtime associate and friend, Richard Scrivani, which marked the . While Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul may be gone from this mortal coil, his memory will continue on for generations of Chiller fans and more

2006 saw release of the book, Goodnight, Whatever You Are!, by longtime associate and friend, Richard Scrivani, which marked the first-ever, in-depth chronicle of the life and career of the Cool Ghoul. It made its debut at Chiller ‘s October convention. While Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul may be gone from this mortal coil, his memory will continue on for generations of Chiller fans and more. We’ll leave you with a couple of this Gore 4er’s personal memorabilia – an eerie encounter at a past Chiller, and a treasured, signed copy of Dr. Horror. remembrance by Brian de Castro.

The book Goodnight, Whatever You Are by Richard Scrivani, chronicling the life and times of The Cool Ghoul, debuted at the Chiller Theatre Expo in Secaucus, New Jersey, in October 2006.

The book Goodnight, Whatever You Are by Richard Scrivani, chronicling the life and times of The Cool Ghoul, debuted at the Chiller Theatre Expo in Secaucus, New Jersey, in October 2006 The comic book anthology, Zacherley's Midnite Terrors (created by Joseph M. Monks, and featuring top artists like Basil Gogos, Ken Kelly, William Stout and Mike Koneful), was created solely as a tribute to "Zach". A girl with strange psychotic powers senses murder and a hidden treasure in an old house. October 23, 1959 (1959-10-23).

The first-ever in-depth look at the life and career of one of the great icons of 1950s-60s TV - Zacherley, television's first great 'horror host,' a pop phenomenon as important as Elvis or hula hoops. Learn how Zacherley became an institution, and trace his later career as an FM radio deejay, a guest on Saturday Night Live and star of TV commercials.
Thozius
Television in the 50s and 60s was a medium still struggling to establish a unique identity for itself. Much of what was presently initially could be described as radio shows with images or vaudeville to a very large theater. Radio stars, including such giants as Jack Benny and Burns and Allen simply did their radio shows from sets instead of studios; detective and cop shows made the move in a similar manner while comedians such as Milton Berle brought their stage shows onto the - at least at the time - not-so-big screen.

The movie studios, at first, were confounded by television. After all, it was free and presented a perceived threat to their profitability. However, it wasn't long before these companies took a different view of the situation, Sitting in their libraries were scores...hundreds...thousands of films that were providing no revenue stream whatsoever. So, some genius came up with the concept of leasing packages of films to television stations to broadcast. I'm sure all of us living in an area that had an independent station (or more than one) can remember a show that played movies. In the New York metro area one station did, for a time, play the same movie repeatedly as if it were a theater.

The movies presented were by-and-large benign; this was the 50s and 60s, after all. Most were from the 30s and 40s and came from a variety of genres. But, there was one genre that didn't get much play: horror films. And so, Universal - the company that had pioneered these films from the 30s on and was quite literally synonymous with them - went ahead and leased their `Shock' package of films which included the classics of Karloff and Lugosi among others. These films were considered by many to be - to use a current phrase - "too disturbing" for prime time. They were, therefore, relegated to late night, say after 10:00 PM, when children and the faint-hearted were already in bed. All well and good, but then another thing happened. While the prime time movies presented on shows `The Early Show' or `The Million Dollar Movie' had no host - just maybe a voice-over at the start or finish - some of the horror movie shows - `Shock Theater' (named after the Universal package - decided to use a host, But, this plan - just as the plans of the good Dr Frankenstein swerved from the center of the highway and into a ditch - went a bit further than just having a person stand there and introduce the film. It was decided at WCAU in Philadelphia (and possibly, perhaps very likely, in other markets) that the host would 1) dress in appropriate - that is to say scary - garb and would insert himself into the films and perform some humor shtick.

In Philadelphia on WCAU, the person given this role/opportunity was a 40ish veteran of World War Two named John Zacherle. What happened on that station in Philadelphia and subsequently in New York is what this book relates. It is an odd story - at times touching, at other times hilarious and, throughout, utterly amazing. It is told in the form of an oral history built on the author's interactions with and the reminiscences of Mr. Zacherle and many of the other participants. It is also a story of ever-lasting fame as the character or characters to be exact created by Mr. Zacherle hosted horror film shows for a very short period of time. But, the image became long-lived; perhaps a strange term for the character I am discussing was of the undead.

Philadelphia knew him as Roland and his appearance was like a cross between an undertaker and a vampire; rail-thin and dressed in black with medallions and a ghostly white countenance. His commentaries and skits were off-kilter, displaying both sarcasm and wit. He was "joined" on the set by a never-seen wife who resided in a coffin or - later on - a laundry basket. Other associates were sounds or made up things from Jell-O and cheesecloth.

He departed WCAU as mysteriously as he arrived. Next came New York City; over the next few years he did the same job at three stations: WABC, WPIX and WOR. He was now known as Zacherley. The name change was probably to create distance from the WCAU character. It was also appropriate because this incarnation was far wilder and cynical than Roland had ever been. The fourth wall was broken with more regularity, as were props and pieces of the set. The skits became longer with themes, mostly science projects gone awry (much as we used to wish they would during our school science and/or biology classes). The planned chaos - though planned may be a misnomer, Mr. Scrivani's interviews seem to indicate that scripts were rather superficial and there was a great reliance on ad-libing when events warranted. (Yes, I realize that sounds exactly like the plots for Soupy Sales; but that was later). Many of us - hell, all of us - have a favorite that will still cause us to smile when we think of it even today. Mine was from the WOR period and was broadcast on March 25, 1960 (the book contains appendices that lists information about the NYC-based shows as to the film shown and the in-studio storyline) involved the discovery and attempted vivisection of the missing link found in The Great Swamp aka The Meadowlands. It was Jello in cheesecloth with 15 watt light bulbs for eyes. By the end of it, the link had expired...actually the Jello melted despite Zach's efforts, which included taking off his pants and climbing into the kiddie pool that held the amoeba.

Then, as before, he was gone with little or no fanfare and even less explanation.

A few years later, he returned this time hosting Disc-O-Teen a live music show a la American Bandstand. Zach was still a riot but something had changed. Now, he was an institution. He was still the hip guy but now - in the mid 60s - he wasn't quite as edgy. That didn't mean you wouldn't watch though, because the show was still better than anything else on the air. This is where author Scrivani became closely associated with The Cool Ghoul, who seemed to have an open door policy towards those he favored. Much of this section of the book - and, it is the bulk of the tome - are stories about the Disc-O-Teen show derived from transcripts of Zach and his followers. Some of these interviews are contemporary with the shows while others are a look-back.

And it is entertaining to say the least as stories catalog the comings and goings of famous, no-so-famous and infamous rock groups who appear against a background that whether live or taped live was, at times, a chaotic event. This tenure lasted some two and a half years, at which time the show was abruptly cancelled. Mr. Scrivani posits a number of reasons for the cancellation ranging from technological (the ability to get the show on contemporary sets required purchase of a convertor box allowing the viewer to tune to the UHF wavelength) to the decline in the on-set audience's dancing abilities and age. It's hard to know what caused the show to be dropped - the station did eventually fail - but I don't think I'm the only one seeing a pattern here. I think this show and the ones before failed becasue it was, by every sense of the definitoon, a cult show. That meant it would never have a huge following and so it's revenue generation was limited.

The author then fast-forwards to the 90s when a reunion is held for the regular show attendees. This is followed by the rise of Zach's appearances at various monster conventions and so forth. It is also a time when, for reasons not explained or even conjectured, John Zacherle the artist takes the author under his wing and proceeds to give him some of the key stage props from the various shows. The final chapters discuss "current" events related to The Cool Ghoul: the production of a limited edition video archive; an appearance in a low-budget film and his life in semi-retirement. The former consisted of what surviving kinescopes there are with additional commentary. The second seems to have been a bit of a comedy of errors with Mr. Zacherle's role expanding and contracting as the makers seemed to struggle with virtually all aspects of the process. The third is rather touching as this clearly elderly, though still vibrant man bonds with a few close friends who devote themselves to providing him with a quality of life in return for the joy he gave them.

These stories are presented by Mr. Scrivani in a relatively straightforward manner, though to me it is clear the participants were over their heads from time to time. Another aspect of the narrative is Mr. Zacherle's response to all this. He comes across as a bit vague at times, often deferring a decision only to, after making it, to reverse himself. OK, I stipulate that the man is in his 80s at this time and that should be taken into account, However, author Scrivani had been interacting with him since some time in the mid 60s and this circumstance - of vagueness on detail, loss of memory or maybe just plain evasiveness, perhaps - appears to me as having been there all the time.

This is to me a fault in the book; Mr. Scrivani's adulation for Zach. It apparently prevented him from gleaning a lot of detailed information about the in-and-outs and hows-and-whys of the star's actions, particularly in the early days of his career. The move from Philly to The City is understandable; you always go to the bigger market. The move between three stations in less than five years is more puzzling. Was it a case that ratings were bad? This seems unlikely as he changed with little or no gaps in employment. Did he alienate management? Maybe. It's not even clear if he was under any sort of contract; the man himself if awfully reticent on the business details. It was hard for me to fathom the reason for John Zacherle's vagueness about the events related to WCAU, WABC, WPIX and WOR. While I recognize age may have had something to do with it, I also felt that the author may have been too willing to gloss over these tenures to concentrate on the 60s show that so enthralled him (as it would have me!).

It's also the case, that I came away with very little understanding and insight into the personality of John Zacherle. Mr. Scrivani portrays him as a lovable person who seemed driven to share his time before, during and after with a select few of the teens/young adults who came to Disc-O-Teen all the time. Eventually, we learn the man lives in Manhattan in a four story walk up on 96th Street. We were informed earlier in the book that he has a mother and a married brother. But, of his personal life, there is very little until the last chapters of the book when we learn a bit more about some relationships, including a girlfreind of sorts. These fragments - thrown out here and there in the text - are akin to seeing something from a speeding train; you want to know more but are unable to do so. There is scant more on a website that appears to be run by Mr. Zacherle and/or some friends/associates. It certainly leaves the impression the man wants to keep his non-performing life private.

And, from that point of view, Mr. Scrivani's forty year journey during which time he moves from fan to companion is what this book is all about.
Katius
What more can you say about a book that so lovingly & painstakingly paints a portrait of an underappreciated '50-'60s icon ? This book provides an enormously entertainingly look into Zacherley as a persona & a man. In amazing detail, it traces Zacherley through his TV start to Shock Theatre to Disco-Teen to FM radio DJ. I admit that I couldn't put this book down & finished reading it in 2 days. I even read this enjoyable book over again twice ( something which I have never done before ) ---Anyone who remembers or just wants to discover Zacherley & '60s music will love this book.---- This book was an obvious labor of love from a great author.-- I would love to see more books by Mr. Scrivani although it will be tough to beat this one...
Kieel
I would recommend this book for any "child" of the late 50's or 60's who considers him or herself to be a fan of Zacherley. It was a very fast and interesting read for those interested in Zach and the path his career took on TV and radio. The book also provides some valuable personal insights into John Zacherley the man as seen through the eyes of one devoted fan. It paints John as a kind man who was very greatful for the love and attention of his fans. The book also features three factual appendices for people who loved the old Universal horror movies and the successful run they had on New York television when hosted by Zach.
Cobyno
Growing up in PA. in the 50s, I am one of the many baby-boomers who watched John Zacherley! His debut was in Philadelphia, PA. at WCAU then and his name was "Roland". The program was "Shock Theater". After watching Zacherley on this show there was no doubt in my mind that Zacherley is a true "comedy genius!" He is definitely of the FUNNIEST men I ever watched on television! I remember when watching him, back then on "Shock Theater" one of the many funny scenes was when in the movie they were showing (usually a 30s/40s Universal film) there would be a villain looking through a window and then next thing you know they would cut to Zach looking through a window in the studio making strange faces! Myself and my family would LAUGH our heads off! It was hilarous! I will never forget that pet amoeba of his and his wife "Isobel" in the casket. The legendary John Zacherley has definitely earned the honorable title of, "The King Of The Horror Hosts!" In fact in the Late 50s it was Zach with his fantastic show, "Shock Theater" and Forrest J. Ackerman with the appearance of his revered monster magazine,"Famous Monsters" in Feb. 1958 that help sparked my life-long interest and love in sci-fi and horror films! These two loveable great ICONS helped bring these genres to a fore-front! Oh those wonderful years! "GOODNIGHT WHATEVER YOU ARE?", is a well-written loving tribute to this wonderful very kind man.......... "The King Of Horror-Hosts," the Cool-Ghoul Zacherley! The author Richard Scrivani is good friends with Zacherley and he should be very proud of this WONDERFUL book! This VERY enjoyable book is jam-packed with valuable imformation about Zacherley's career, and stories...... Richard's fascinating memories of being friends with Zach since 1965! I also enjoy the many rare and interesting photos with Zach, beautifully illustrated through-out the book! I also thought but was not positive that I first seen one of my favorite movies, "FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLFMAN" in 1958 on "Shock Theater." My suspicions were finally "confirmed" after many years when reading the appendix section towards the back of the book. I saw the listing for the original "Shock Theater" television line-up for 1958. And there it was listed being shown in 1958. There is so much great imformation like this in the book! This is another one of those books that is so enjoyable that you want to read it straight through! Richard Scrivani is a "highly talented" writer one of the BEST out there and I hope that This talented, horror film historian, and Universal horror film historian writes more wonderful books! This is one of four of the best books I read in the last three years! Thank you so very much Richard for writing this amazing book! And thank you so very much, Zach for making my life a happier one! TO ALL THE MANY ZACH FANS OUT THERE BUY THIS GREAT BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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