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eBook Ziegfeld: The Man Who Invented Show Business ePub

by Ethan Mordden

eBook Ziegfeld: The Man Who Invented Show Business ePub
Author: Ethan Mordden
Language: English
ISBN: 0312375433
ISBN13: 978-0312375430
Publisher: St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (November 11, 2008)
Pages: 352
Category: Arts & Literature
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 425
Formats: lit mbr mbr txt
ePub file: 1663 kb
Fb2 file: 1600 kb

A book on Ziegfeld that lists show names but doesn't describe the shows? That mentions style without defining .

Any girl who twists her hat will be fired! – Florenz ZiegfeldAnd no Ziegfeld girl ever did as she made her way down the . When he left it, the glamorous world of "show-biz" had been created

Any girl who twists her hat will be fired! – Florenz ZiegfeldAnd no Ziegfeld girl ever did as she made her way down the gala stairways of the Ziegfeld Follies in some of the most astonishing spectacles the American theatergoing public ever witnessed. When Florenz Ziegfeld started in theater, it was flea circus, operetta and sideshow all rolled into one. When he left it, the glamorous world of "show-biz" had been created. Though many know him as the man who "glorified the American girl," his first real star attraction was the bodybuilder Eugen Sandow, who flexed his muscles.

In Ziegfeld: The Man Who Created Show Business, Ethan Mordden recreates the lost world of the Follies, a. .I loved this biography. The author, Ethan Mordden, did absolutely amazing at telling Ziegfeld's story and legacy

In Ziegfeld: The Man Who Created Show Business, Ethan Mordden recreates the lost world of the Follies, a place of long-vanished beauty masterminded by one of the most inventive, ruthless, street-smart and exacting men ever to fill a theatre on the Great White Way : Florenz Ziegfeld. The author, Ethan Mordden, did absolutely amazing at telling Ziegfeld's story and legacy. While I'm sure some won't like casual and carefree way Mordden writes sometimes, I loved it. It's what you need a biography that can get lost in so many facts and so many names from the past.

Who was Ziegfeld the man? Really just an extension of Ziegfeld the girl glorifier.

Acclaimed historian Ethan Mordden brings to life the nostalgia and mystery of Florenz Ziegfeld, J. the man who created The Follies and show business. A quick, entertaining read. com User, April 17, 2009. A good friend who knows how much I love reading about Florenz Ziegfeld gave me this book for Christmas. After taking a few glances at some pages, I had the impression that the book couldn't offer me any more information on the Great Glorifier than I already knew.

Ziegfeld: The Man Who Invented Show Business. Any girl who twists her hat will be fired!

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Ziegfeld: The Man Who Invented Show Business. Any girl who twists her hat will be fired! – Florenz Ziegfeld. And no Ziegfeld girl ever did as she made her way down the gala stairways of the Ziegfeld Follies in some of the most astonishing spectacles the American theatergoing public ever witnessed.

The Man Who Invented Show Business. In Ziegfeld: The Man Who Created Show Business, Ethan Mordden recreates the lost world of the Follies, a place of long-vanished beauty masterminded by one of the most inventive, ruthless, street-smart and exacting men ever to fill a theatre on the Great White Way : Florenz Ziegfeld.

With all those books he wrote, I know very few professors who ever assigned one to.

With all those books he wrote, I know very few professors who ever assigned one to their MBA students," says O'Toole. Peter would never have gotten tenure in a major business school. His examination led to the publication of his groundbreaking book, Concept of the Corporation, and his decision, in 1950, to attach himself to New York University's Graduate School of Business. engagin. his book is as much history as biography. Ziegfeld's personal life is consistently blank, but Mordden fills his pages with cast lists of every single "Follies," with mini-biographies of every star and comic an extensive history of "Show Boat," which Ziegfeld produced. -Washington Post

Any girl who twists her hat will be fired! – Florenz Ziegfeld

And no Ziegfeld girl ever did as she made her way down the gala stairways of the Ziegfeld Follies in some of the most astonishing spectacles the American theatergoing public ever witnessed. When Florenz Ziegfeld started in theater, it was flea circus, operetta and sideshow all rolled into one. When he left it, the glamorous world of "show-biz" had been created. Though many know him as the man who "glorified the American girl,"his first real star attraction was the bodybuilder Eugen Sandow, whoflexed his muscles and thrilled the society matrons who came backstage to squeeze his biceps.His lesson learned with Sandow, Ziegfeld went on to presentAnna Held, the naughty French sensation, who became the first Mrs. Ziegfeld. He wasone of the first impresarios to mix headliners of different ethnic backgrounds, and literally the earliest proponent of mixed-race casting. The stars he showcased and, in some cases, created have become legends: Billie Burke (who also became his wife),elfin Marilyn Miller, cowboy Will Rogers,Bert Williams,W. C. Fields, Eddie Cantor and,last but not least, neighborhood diva Fanny Brice. A man of voracious sexual appetites when it came to beautiful women, Ziegfeld knew what he wanted and what others would want as well. From that passion, the Ziegfeld Girl was born. Elaborately bejeweled, they wore little more than a smile as they glided through eye-popping tableaux that were the highlight ofthe Follies, presented almost every year from 1907 to 1931. Ziegfeld's reputation and power, however, went beyond the stage of the Follies as he produced a number of other musicals, among them the ground-breakingShow Boat. In Ziegfeld: The Man Who Created Show Business, Ethan Mordden recreates the lost world of the Follies, a place of long-vanished beauty masterminded by one of the most inventive, ruthless, street-smart and exacting men ever to fill a theatre on the Great White Way : Florenz Ziegfeld.

Qumenalu
Great book about Ziegfeld and the era in American entertainment that he helped define. This is the third book
by Ethan Mordden that I have read. The other two were about the Hollywood studio, and then female film stars. They
are great sources of historical information and insight into the entertainment world.

The author begins at the beginning- with Ziegfeld's birth in Chicago to immigrant parents; but
quickly gets to Ziegfeld's "showbiz" roots which began with managing a venue for his musician father near to the
World's Fair of 1893 and the promotion of strong man, Eugen Sandow. Then the launch into prominence with
bringing Anna Held to the US and Broadway in the late 1890s, leading to the development and fame of the Follies;
and the final successes of the late 1920s musicals (ShowBoat, etc). Ziegfeld established the careers of the
biggest names in show business in the 1910s and 1920s, and his revues created the standards of American
theatrical entertainment that influenced the golden age of both film( musicals) and musical comedy/theater

Mordden has written extensively on American film and theater and certainly knows the history of American
entertainment in the 20th century. He writes like someone who loves to talk and tell a story, and the prose
style is quick,colorful and witty. Fun to read.

Now, as several reviewers have mentioned, there is very little "personal" information on Ziegfeld in this
book He seems to have been a man who kept his private life very private, and Mordden addresses this issue
directly. The author had to derive what little detailed information about the "man" Ziegfeld there is from
only a few reliably written sources, the main one being the autobiography by Ziegfeld's second wife, Billie
Burke. So this is primarily a book about Zeigeld the entertainment mogul; but considering that the four main
love interests in his life were all female entertainers who had worked for him, not to mention the dozens of
his showgirls who he bedded, I think we get a pretty clear portrait of Ziegfeld - his work was also his
passion.
Extensive bibliography on sources and additional information on Ziegfeld and the era.
Gravelblade
When Ethan Mordden writes about theater, especially musical theater, he has no peer. So if you approach this book as a survey of Ziegfeld's WORK, you will not be disappointed. However, from the outset Mordden tells us how little is really known or understood about the private life, the internal life, if you will, of Ziegfeld the man. He then proceeds to live up to this caveat by telling us as much, or as little, as he promises. The general feeling of the book is: we may not know how a man who grew up with classical music as his background ended up starting in Burlesque or, looked at another way, how a man whose very being was wrapped up in revue and burlesque gave us "The Follies" or how the "Follies" man gave us "Show Boat", but who cares, he did! Mordden is right! The only real flaw in the book is Mordden's referral to pictures, posters, artwork, etc. that we never get to see. How about a revised, illustrated, edition!
GEL
I absolutely loved reading this book about Ziegfeld. It was a very interesting story.
Authis
A good friend who knows how much I love reading about Florenz Ziegfeld gave me this book for Christmas. After taking a few glances at some pages, I had the impression that the book couldn't offer me any more information on the Great Glorifier than I already knew. I was wrong. Ethan Mordden writes about Ziegfeld's life with a light, fun, entertaining, non-scholarly style; I loved the author's sense of dry humor and slightly wicked turn-of-phrase. More than anything, I appreciated the myth-busting Mordden employs. He dispels many long-held beliefs about such matters such as the supposed romantic relationship Ziegfeld shared with Marilyn Miller and the supposed artistic and financial failure of the "Follies" Ziegfeld produced after the 1922 edition. Mordden places his readers in the heart of Old Broadway, giving us the flavor of the time -- the fun, excitement, grime, love of theatre, etc. -- an invaluable feat. The only complaint I have with the book is its lack of photographs. There are very few of them included when dozens exist.
Broadraven
I am such a fan of the Ziegfeld Girls and all things vintage so I particularly loved learning about the man who was the beginning of it all.
Alsalar
A fine read that also provides great historical detail about the transitions from vaudeville to "legitimate theater" in New York. It's fascinating to read that the current midtown was really as uptown as you could reasonably want to travel. The great stars were emerging, but the great impresarios provided the vehicles, quite dazzling if you consider the primitive conditions for actors (theaters closed in the summer, and there was no amplification to hear thin voices as there is today). This is rich in detail and intrigue (Ziegfeld was a world-class womanizer). As for the stars, I'm reminded of a favorite quote I read somewhere from a starlet long ago: "A private railroad car is not an acquired taste. One gets used to it instantly."
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