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eBook No Regrets ePub

by Caroline Seebohm

eBook No Regrets ePub
Author: Caroline Seebohm
Language: English
ISBN: 0684810085
ISBN13: 978-0684810089
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (October 21, 1997)
Pages: 448
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 464
Formats: rtf mbr doc txt
ePub file: 1194 kb
Fb2 file: 1968 kb

Caroline Seebohm, whose previous books include a zippy biography of magazine mogul Conde Nast, does justice to Tree's busy life in a lively text crowded with incident.

Caroline Seebohm, whose previous books include a zippy biography of magazine mogul Conde Nast, does justice to Tree's busy life in a lively text crowded with incident. From Library Journal. Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle.

Caroline Seebohm is at her best in discussing the challenges and constraints of Marietta's largely unsuccessful attempts to balance her emotions with her marital and parental responsibilities. Unfortunately this 420 page book is too long. There are two many extraneous details, too much padding.

This book is not only about Marietta Tree, it is about her time and her environment. It is about the options se had as a woman of her class, and the consequences of the choices she made. She did not make the usual choices. An interesting woman. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. This well written book sheds light on the many aspects of a complex woman.

Seebohm (The Man Who Was Vogue, 1982, et. staves off these comparisons, offering instead a chronological narrative that depends heavily on Tree's glamorous appointment . The Life of Marietta Tree. staves off these comparisons, offering instead a chronological narrative that depends heavily on Tree's glamorous appointment books. She divorced FitzGerald, married Ronald Tree, whose money was in America and whose heart was in England.

No Regrets: The life of Marietta Tree. Book and Jacket appear to have hardly been read and are both in Fine condition throughout. Jacket Condition:Fine.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Author of English country, The last romantics, Boca Rococo, No regrets, The man who was Vogue, Private Ladscapes, The country house, Little Pancho. The man who was Vogue.

You been through the hardest spot, it go the largest, I made you a star (Screamin' out no regrets) I been movin' slowly, tryna play it low the 'Vette look like a storm Screamin' out no regrets Put you through.

You been through the hardest spot, it go the largest, I made you a star (Screamin' out no regrets) I been movin' slowly, tryna play it low the 'Vette look like a storm Screamin' out no regrets Put you through dumb shit, got you thinkin' I run shit I ain't havin' regrets I been so alone, just like. You been through the hardest spot, it go the largest, I made you a star (Screamin' out no regrets) I been movin' slowly, tryna play it low the 'Vette look like a storm Screamin' out no regrets Put you through dumb shit, got you thinkin' I run shit I ain't havin' regrets I been so alone, just like. I'm so lost, just like I'm-.

Caroline Seebohm is a journalist who has written for the Wall Street Journal, Town & Country, Travel & Leisure, and House & Garden, among other publications. She is the author of the biographies No Regrets: The Life of Marietta Tree and The Man Who Was Vogue: The Life and Times of Conde Nast. She lives in New Jersey.

An intimate portrait of Marietta Tree follows the life and times of the political activist and society doyenne who knew Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Marilyn Monroe and who fought for both civil rights and women's rights. 30,000 first printing. Tour.
Iseared
I've been pondering why I didn't enjoy this book more than I did. It's more like 3.5 stars which is strange because she was an interesting, productive woman but somehow it didn't translate to much of a life for a biography. If she had written a memoir, with her thoughts and insights, it probably would have been interesting but a biography written by an outsider focuses more on the exterior events in a life and therefore needs some concrete achievements or tangible life changing milestones to provide scaffolding otherwise a life can read somewhat flat and blank. But in Marietta's case, her accomplishments were more the behind the scenes variety so rarely recorded. If you have read anything about Pamela Harriman Reflected Glory you may feel as I did, that there is something about their lives that echo each other however it seems to me that Marietta's was less frivolous but why exactly is not clear, maybe less focus on 'entertaining' and materialism (besides the minor detail that Pamela Harriman plowed thru a huge fortune that imho should have gone to Harriman's children).

In the end, the most interesting thing that remains is who loved her - that she had the love of a couple very desirable men such as the director John Huston and the politician Adlai Stevenson, both of whom were pursued by a ton of women and yet Marietta was the one who won their heart. John Huston was a real womanizer so to hear about the woman who broke his heart An Open Book made me really curious about her, particularly since he loved her all his life, still seeing her right before he died and she wasn't part of hollywood but instead east coast old school society - but avoided being pinned as part of the 'women who lunch' group. And Adlai also had his own fan-club of very desirable women who were wildly interested in him for reasons not quite clear to me as yet. Marietta was walking with him as he had his heart attack on the sidewalk and died later that day.

I did wonder about a few of the choices the author made in omitting info or delaying info. For instance - (Possible Spoiler Alert) - the fact that Ronald Tree was bisexual was only mentioned near the end of the book after describing chapter after chapter of her affair with Adlai and flirtations with others - it felt as if the author wanted to establish that having affairs was part of Marietta's character and had nothing to do with finding out she had married a man who was bisexual and maybe unable to give her the romantic or passionate love she anticipated and was probably also cheating on her all along albeit with the same sex. Surely that might have played into why she started to have an affair after just a few years into her marriage.

The other thing I had to wonder at was her depiction of Nancy Lancaster as a emotional nut, the author mentions the deaths of her first husband and baby but omits the full force of tragedy that hit her in a span of just 6 or 7 years starting when she was 16 and lost her father unexpectedly and then 2 weeks later for completely unrelated reasons her perfectly healthy mother also dropped dead, then 4 years later her newlywed first husband dies also unexpectedly in a tragic complication from simple tonsil removal and to top it off, her first baby with Ronald dies - I think experiencing just 2 of these events would define one's life but all 4 of these tragic deaths before you are 25 must really effect your view of life and emotional stability. And of course Nancy found herself in the same position Marietta was, married to a man whose sexual orientation meant she would have to share him emotionally and physically. Of course this book isn't about Nancy, I just want to point out that even in brief, I felt her depiction wasn't fair.

Would also recommend John Huston's autobiography An Open Book which is quite interesting but just a little about Marietta and Nancy Lancaster: Her Life, Her World, Her Art which has really interesting quotes from her but does get quite a bit into decorating. Would be curious to read Ronald Tree's autobiography When the moon was high: Memoirs of peace and war, 1897-1942 and of course a good bio on Adlai Stevenson.
Jay
I have owned this book for five years and thought about reading it several times. Finally, after reading the excellent books by Lynne Olson "Troublesome Young Men" and "Citizens of London," I remembered this book and wanted to see if there was a connection with Ronald Tree of Great Britain and Marietta Tree. After reading those parts and confirming their relationship and, then, starting again at the beginning of this book,
I find I have no patience for Caroline Seebohm's style of writing. There are way too many affected flourishes of words and phrases as well the
psychological conclusions she draws of the thoughts and actions of the people mentioned when she has absolutely no information or credentials for doing so. Where were the editors she credits in her acknowledgments who let her put in every thought or bit of information she came across with
unnecessary embellishments? There are too many well written books for me to spend any more time reading this one.
Gabar
Very detailed biography but the author withheld an important fact about Ronald Tree until page 317 and was thus unfair to her subject. Knowing it earlier would have affected the reader's perception of Marietta Tree and her relationships. Don't want to say more than that because it might be plot-spoiling -- if you can plot spoil the biography of a famous person. But my knowledge of Marietta Tree's life before I read this was minimal. Now I know a lot more. Just wish some of it had been told sooner.
Xor
Boring-
Sadaron above the Gods
This book seems more like a work of fiction or a docudrama than a biography.
The author talks about her subjects emotions in a factual manner- emotions that the
author couldn't possibly pretend to know or actually confirm.
This is the worst kind of biography and the family is probably sick about their cooperation.
They couldn't possibly have realized what a hatchet job this book would be.
Skyway
This well written book sheds light on the many aspects of a complex woman. The contrast between her somewhat puritanical streak - a result of her upbringing in the famous Peabody family - and her enjoyment of the high life is riveting. In the end the reader finds her to be likable but not without fault.
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