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eBook Wellington: A Personal History ePub

by Christopher Hibbert

eBook Wellington: A Personal History ePub
Author: Christopher Hibbert
Language: English
ISBN: 0738201480
ISBN13: 978-0738201481
Publisher: Da Capo Press; Revised ed. edition (June 1, 1999)
Pages: 504
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 329
Formats: rtf doc txt lrf
ePub file: 1190 kb
Fb2 file: 1167 kb

Christopher Hibbert's biography of the first Duke of Wellington is, as advertised, a personal history. Hibbert is to be commended for devoting the second half of the book to Wellington's long and often neglected career as politician and public servant.

Christopher Hibbert's biography of the first Duke of Wellington is, as advertised, a personal history. His focus is on the man and much less on his long career in the British Army and British political life. His finding, that Wellington was a complex man with a many-sided personality, is not a new discovery. Here, Wellington's well-developed military talents and Tory instincts were often less useful in the indifferent chaos of politics.

Wellington: A Personal History. An interesting book that explores the personal side of Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington. There are many interesting sides to the life of this extraordinary man: his disastrous marriage, which he stayed in, his preference for the company and conversation of intelligent women, his wonderful report with children, his at times ridiculous generosity in time and money, An interesting book that explores the personal side of Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington.

British author Christopher Hibbert’s excellent biography, Wellington: A Personal History (Addison Wesley .

British author Christopher Hibbert’s excellent biography, Wellington: A Personal History (Addison Wesley, Reading, Mass. Those who knew Arthur Wellesley early in his life predicted that he would be both a great general and the prime minister of Britain–if he lived.

The prolific Hibbert (Nelson: A Personal History, 1994, et. offers a lively . A nice biography by Christopher Hibbert. offers a lively if unsurprising portrait of a contentious hero. Arthur Wellesley, later to become the duke of Wellington, took to the. Although Hibbert disclaims any "in depth" coverage of Wellington's military and political careers, most readers should find what he offers more than sufficient. He wrote more than 60 books throughout his lifetime including The Road to Tyburn (1957), Il Duce: The Life of Benito Mussolini(1962), George IV: Prince of Wales, 1762-1811 (1972), and George IV: Regent and King, 1812-1830 (1973).

Christopher Hibbert (born Arthur Raymond Hibbert) MC (5 March 1924 . Wellington: A Personal History (Da Capo, 1997). George III: A Personal History (Penguin, 1998). ISBN 978-0-14-025737-3.

Christopher Hibbert (born Arthur Raymond Hibbert) MC (5 March 1924 – 21 December 2008), was an English author, historian and biographer. Christopher Hibbert was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and the Royal Geographical Society, and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Literature by the University of Leicester. Hibbert lived at Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, and was a member of the Army and Navy Club and the Garrick Club. Queen Victoria: A Personal History (HarperCollins, 2000).

Wellington: A Personal History Текст. Автор:Christopher Hibbert.

The Iron Duke (1769-1852), Napoleon's greatest antagonist, finally ended his global ambitions at the battle of Waterloo in 1815. A brilliant general, remembered most for his defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, Wellington was also a politician of commanding presence. Elected Prime Minister in 1827, he was an influential adviser to kings and queens, and became deeply involved in all the major scandals of the time, delighting in mixing himself up in other people's affairs.

Christopher Hibbert QUEEN VICTORIA A Personal History For Amy, Lily . Queen victoria's prime ministers.

Christopher Hibbert QUEEN VICTORIA A Personal History For Amy, Lily and Rose with love AUTHOR'S NOTE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS In an essay read to fellows and members of the Royal. 1835 Viscount Melbourne (Whig). At a ball in Brussels, where Wellington was serving as commander of the allied forces on the Continent after the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, Creevey was approached by the great Duke who said to him, 'Well Creevey, what has passed between you and the Corporal since you have met this time?'

Christopher Hibbert is Britain’s leading popular historian. Wellington (1769–1852) achieved fame as a soldier fighting the Mahratta in India.

Christopher Hibbert is Britain’s leading popular historian. His later brilliant generalship fighting the French in Spain and his defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo earned him a dukedom and the award of Apsley House (No. 1, London) and a large estate in Hampshire. His second career saw him make his mark as a politician with commanding presence. 1, London) and a large estate in Hampshire

A brilliant general, remembered most for his defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, Wellington was also a politician of commanding presence. Elected Prime Minister in 1827, he was an influential adviser to kings and queens, and became deeply involved in all the major scandals of the time, delighting in mixing himself up in other people's affairs. Celebrated for his sardonic humor and savage rages which alternated with irresistible charm, he concealed a deep humanity behind a veneer of aloofness that gained him the sobriquet, “the Iron Duke.” Filled with fresh insights on aspects of Wellington's life and character, Christopher Hibbert has shown once again why he is one of our finest popular historians.
Геракл
A great story of an ordinary man who achieved extraordinary things.
kinder
I got this for my Grandfather for christmas and he loved it. It was in great condition and was perfect. I would recommend it to everyone.
Fast Lovebird
Christopher Hibbert's biography of the first Duke of Wellington is, as advertised, a personal history. His focus is on the man and much less on his long career in the British Army and British political life. His finding, that Wellington was a complex man with a many-sided personality, is not a new discovery. Hibbert's contribution to a crowded field of biographies is to delve into that personality with both enthusiasm and some intellectual discipline in order to put a human face on a distant historical figure.

The first half of the book covers Arthur Wellesley's unpromising youth as the seemingly less talented middle child of an Anglo-Irish nobleman and his familar military career to the Battle of Waterloo. Hibbert skims the military narrative and his analysis is sometimes uneven. For example, he makes rather overmuch of a small skirmish before the assault on Seringapatam in India as a defining experience; but slights later achievements such as Wellington's disciplined and successful defense of Portugal in 1810-1811. He does provide a close examination of Wellington's unfortunate marriage with Kitty Pakenham and his relationships with other women, without necessarily exceeding the spotty factual basis for those relationships.

Hibbert is to be commended for devoting the second half of the book to Wellington's long and often neglected career as politician and public servant. Here, Wellington's well-developed military talents and Tory instincts were often less useful in the indifferent chaos of politics. His relationships, alleged or otherwise, with various women, play a prominent part in Hibbert's treatment.

Ultimately, this book is less satisfying as an examination of Wellington than, for example, Elizabeth Longford's longer but more balanced teatment. Hibbert's account perhaps a little too often reads like the gossip column of the Sunday newspaper.

This book is recommended to those looking for a popular biography of the Duke of Wellington, one suited to contemporary interest in the personal side of public figures.
Fenritaur
I have always thought of the Duke of Wellington as the Hero of Waterloo, but little else. In "Wellington, A Personal History" I learned that he was much more.
This book is, as the title indicates, a personal history of the man, rather than a history of his times. The reader learns little of the details of Waterloo, nor does he learn much about the impact of his career on the wider world.
Wellington's story is an interesting one. Born the younger son of lower nobility, his dukedom was earned, rather than inherited. His career was diverse. He fought for the Crown in India before his first encounter with Napoleon's armies in Portugal and Spain during the Peninsular War. The possibility of service in America during the American Revolution was mentioned, but did not occur. The glory which he won at Waterloo was merely a stepping stone to higher service.
After the banishment of Napoleon, Wellington entered the diplomatic service in France. This, coupled with his membership in the House of Lords, led to service as Foreign Minister and Prime Minister, among many other appointments. In office, Wellington was, generally, a supporter of privilege and order. Despite his dominant conservatism, Wellington was flexible enough to adjust to prevailing necessities. Although initially opposed to Catholic Emancipation, he supported Emancipation after concluding that the defeat of Emancipation would have led to more social unrest than the issue was worth. He then not only had to persuade opinion among the Lords and Commons, but also had to overcome the strong opposition of the King in order to get Emancipation passed. This is of particular interest to me, as family legend has it that we are descendants of Daniel O'Connell, whose election to the House of Commons forced the issue. Jews, whose potential for disorder was presumably less than that of Irish Catholics, did not enjoy his support when Emancipation for them was suggested.
During his political career, Wellington endured wide swings in popularity. At times he faced the threats of the mob as a result of his policies. He was forced to turn his home into a fortress and to carry pistols while traveling about London. Even when his popularity was at its nadir, his prestige and personal presence were sufficient to insure his safety.
Wellington's relations with his monarchs make interesting reading. Although he held George IV and William IV in low esteem, his relationship with Victoria was warm and close. He became an intimate and trusted advisor on whom Victoria and other politicians relied as an intermediatory.
Wellington's marriage was unhappy and distant and he became a widower at a fairly young age. These facts caused him to seek and enjoy the companionship of many women through his lifetime. These relationships and their effects on Wellington account for a large portion of this book.
As is common among heroes, Wellington's popularity grew as his vigor and involvement in public affairs diminished. Living to an advanced age, Wellington was revered as Britain's greatest hero.
I often gauge a book by how it makes me think beyond the covers. I compared him to American political generals. His political career was more impressive than Grant's, and of longer duration than Eisenhower's. The closest comparison may be with Washington, both as his country's greatest hero and the man to whom his country repeatedly turned in crises.
My only disappointment in this book, as minor as it is, is that it is so personal that one gets a sense of his times only indirectly. Overall it is a good study of this major historical figure.
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