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eBook Memoirs of Montparnasse (New York Review Books Classics) ePub

by Louis Begley,John Glassco

eBook Memoirs of Montparnasse (New York Review Books Classics) ePub
Author: Louis Begley,John Glassco
Language: English
ISBN: 1590171845
ISBN13: 978-1590171844
Publisher: NYRB Classics; Main edition (May 29, 2007)
Pages: 296
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 302
Formats: lrf mbr rtf lrf
ePub file: 1382 kb
Fb2 file: 1497 kb

It's wonderful to see John Glassco's charming Memoirs of Montparnasse getting the international recognition it. .Glassco won the Governor General’s Award in 1971 for his Selected Poems. Louis Begley lives in New York City

It's wonderful to see John Glassco's charming Memoirs of Montparnasse getting the international recognition it deserves. Like its author - whom I knew quite well in the 1960s - the book is a loveable and eccentric rogue, fond of style and up to mischief. It never fails to entertain. Louis Begley lives in New York City. His previous novels are Wartime Lies, The Man Who Was Late, As Max Saw It, About Schimdt, Mistler’s Exit, Schmidt Delivered, and Shipwreck. Paperback: 296 pages.

Memoirs of Montparnasse is a delicious book about being young, restless, reckless, and without cares. John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse was mostly written before the author was 21, although it wasn't published until long afterward. It is also the best and liveliest of the many chronicles of 1920s Paris and the exploits of the lost generation. In 1928, nineteen-year-old John Glassco escaped Montreal and his overbearing father for the wilder shores. It should be read at last and recognized as the most dramatic of the many narratives dealing with Paris in the 1920's. Malcolm Cowley, The New York Times. In 1928, nineteen-year-old John Glassco escaped Montreal and his overbearing father for the wilder shores of Montparnasse.

The book is presented as a genuine memoir, although Glassco had lightly fictionalized some aspects of the . Toronto, New York: Oxford UP, 1970. ISBN 978-1-59017-184-4.

The book is presented as a genuine memoir, although Glassco had lightly fictionalized some aspects of the work. In it, he describes meeting various celebrities who were living in or passing through Paris at the time, such as James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Ford Madox Ford, Frank Harris, Lord Alfred Douglas and others.

Author: John Glassco. should be read and at last recognized as the most dramatic of the many narratives dealing with Paris in the 1920's. -The New York Times. But Glassco's book, published from a manuscript nearly forty years old, is fresher and truer to the moment than the others, as well as being more novelistic and, in a sense, legendary. A very good book, perhaps a great book. -The Washington Star. The best book of prose by a Canadian that I've ever read.

Memoirs of Montparnasse book. 459 books - 726 voters. I am '20s, hear me roar!

Memoirs of Montparnasse book. I am '20s, hear me roar!

John Glassco’s Memoirs of Montparnasse is a pack of lies, and it doesn’t matter. The book has an intelligent and wry introduction by Louis Begley, brief biographies of the men and women who populate Buffy’s time in Paris, including the real names of those to whom he gave pseudonyms, an explanatory list of some of the famous places Buffy and his friends frequented. They are not necessary, but helpful as are the photographs, though some of the people who seemed glamourous in Glassco’s writing seem rather ordinary and dumpy in black and white.

Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Manufacturer: NYRB Classics Release date: 1 July 2007 ISBN-10 : 1590171845 ISBN-13: 9781590171844. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product .

Memoirs of Montparnasse by John Glassco. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness by Daniel Paul Schreber

Since its first volume, Richard Hughes's High Wind in Jamaica (1999), NYRB Classics has published hundreds of titles. Memoirs of Montparnasse by John Glassco. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness by Daniel Paul Schreber. Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky.

In 1929 John Glassco was 19 and in Paris. Independent culture newsletter

In 1929 John Glassco was 19 and in Paris. A Canadian expat with no contacts and no resources, except for a brains, a colossal dose of chutzpah and the self-confidence of youth, he set about storming the citadels of the literary scene. In a mere 18 months he had met everyone who was anyone. Even before reaching France, he and his friend Graeme Taylor secured an audience with. Independent culture newsletter. The best in film, music, TV & radio straight to your inbox.

Memoirs of Montparnasse is a delicious book about being young, restless, reckless, and without cares. It is also the best and liveliest of the many chronicles of 1920s Paris and the exploits of the lost generation. In 1928, nineteen-year-old John Glassco escaped Montreal and his overbearing father for the wilder shores of Montparnasse. He remained there until his money ran out and his health collapsed, and he enjoyed every minute of his stay. Remarkable for their candor and humor, Glassco’s memoirs have the daft logic of a wild but utterly absorbing adventure, a tale of desire set free that is only faintly shadowed by sadness at the inevitable passage of time.
Thorgaginn
Glassco is probably unknown to most US citizens, as he was a lesser-known 20th century Canadian poet. His semi-fictionalized memoir of 1920s Paris and environs is interesting primarily for the celebrities he allegedly met during his short stay as a layabout student - Hemingway, Bricktop, Richard Le Gallienne, Djuna Barnes, Frank Harris, and a host of others. Fascinating as are some of his adventures, he composed this work from memory, decades after the fact, so one has to wonder how much actually happened or how much he much is elaborated. What's missing here, according to the introduction, are the more sordid details of Glassco's money-making schemes, including work as a 'boy for hire.' Still, anyone looking for a bit of amusement will enjoy Glassco's memoir.
greatest
I never tire of memoirs of the arts community in Paris in the first half of the 20th century. I find John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse to provide a breadth unavailable in those of Ernest Hemingway (A Moveable Feast), Sylvia Beach (Shakespeare and Company), Morley Callaghan (The Last Summer in Paris), and Gertrude Stein (Alice B. Toklas). Glassco was the younger of this group, the least experienced and established, one of the later arrivals on the scene (1927--only Callaghan would arrive a few months later, in 1928), and possibly the cockiest. Barely out of Magill College at age 19, he and fellow Canadian youth Graeme Taylor, dove into the all night café and party scenes, the brothels, the promiscuity, the bisexual experimentation, the nightclubs and the drinking, as well as the intellectual scene. They were open to everyone and anyone (well, as time wore on, not quite everyone). As a result, his book is much more of a Who's Who than the others, it offers anecdotes about Joyce and Stein you won't find in the other books, and it provides more of a sense of the day-to-day, happy-go-lucky, hand-to-mouth experience. Glassco unabashedly sought pleasure.

Glassco was accused of promoting a fraud when he first published this decades later. He was actively working on his memoirs and publishing some of them while in Paris. The initial set up is that he returned to them a few years later when he lay seriously ill from TB in a European sanitarium and added some retrospective notes. In reality he relied on his original notebooks years later, changed some of the names to protect close friends and romantic liaisons, and reconstructed dialogues and occurrences as remembered or felt. In this age of creative nonfiction, we still classify that as nonfiction, not fraud or fiction, and scholars of the era have said Glassco nailed what Paris was. Whatever the case, it makes for a terrific read.

This edition augments the original text with period pictures of the scenes and players and a very helpful gloss of all the people mentioned appended to the back of the book. Louis Begley contributes a decent introduction (though it contains spoilers, so read it after Glassco's narrative). Begley repeatedly misspells the name Glassco made up for one of the women in his life, but that seems to be the only off thing. I had hoped for more on the author's life, but there isn't that much information out there. He returned to Canada after the TB treatment in the early 30s, lived on a farm, delivered mail, published poetry and erotica, married a couple of times and faded away.
Weetont
This is an interesting book in that John Glassco may have written it when young, then finished it when ill and older. Be that as it may, fact or fiction, it's a good read. He is traveling with a friend, Graeme. They encounter many folks of whom we've heard before and some new ones in Paris of the late 20s. He assigns some of them fictitious names. Lots of poverty and partying It's part dialog, part narrative. At the end, there's a fine descriptive summary which identifies the characters and who they are as well as one which does the same for places in Paris and what has happened to them. From this book I found the barman Jimmy Charteris's book This Must Be The Place (Dingo, etc.) and Richard LeGallienne's From a Paris Garret.
Awene
A savvy student of manners, John Glassco has a sharp eye,
an inventive mind and a witty way with words, along with
a worldliness that nothing can shake. This "memoir" of his
late teens in Paris in the 1920s exudes great style as the
author romps around recollections of George Moore, Hemingway-
Joyce-Stein, Man Ray, Bricktop and others, like Kay Boyle.
Many names have been changed. To what extent is the book true?
The answer is as unimportant as the question.
Key figure is writer-editor Robert McAlmon, a dashing literary,
social and sexual host to Montparnasse. While hedonists
and eccentrics graze the shimmer & shadow of life (including
the vulnerable author), John Glassco captures the human truths of
living with an honesty that sparkles.
Doath
Really enjoyed reading this. The way language was used by many of the characters was a delight. Nice look at Paris in the 20's. Neat to see young people chasing dreams.
Gnng
Despite some pretty "show-offy" and borderline archaic vocabulary, this book was a pretty fun read. Mr. Glassco also knows where to skimp on details and where to splash out, especially where he himself is concerned? But I enjoyed the ride, am a big Paris fan so it was exciting for me!
Celace
If you want to find out what it was like living in Paris in the late 1920's, buy or download this book immediately. Don't waste your time reading or re-reading Hemingway or Fitzgerald. This book has it all. John Glassco's memoir deserves to be much more widely read. The writing sparkles.
Surprisingly good, interesting,well paced and surprising. It is incredible the people the author meets and the relationships he forms. The memoirs are full of fascinating and odd people
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