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eBook Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific ePub

by John Allen Nelson,Robert Leckie

eBook Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific ePub
Author: John Allen Nelson,Robert Leckie
Language: English
ISBN: 1400140501
ISBN13: 978-1400140503
Publisher: Tantor Audio; Library - Unabridged CD edition (February 26, 2010)
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 687
Formats: rtf docx lrf doc
ePub file: 1422 kb
Fb2 file: 1781 kb

A helmet for my pillow, A poncho for my bed, My rifle rests across my chest-.

A helmet for my pillow, A poncho for my bed, My rifle rests across my chest-. The foe you gave was strong and brave. And unafraid to die. Speak to The Lord for our comrades, Killed when the battle seemed lost. They went to meet a bright defeat-.

The fields were like a mid-week holiday that saves a job from drudgery. It was a recess, a winter vacation. Fear seemed almost to vanish.

Robert Leckie’s theme is the purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a. .

Robert Leckie’s theme is the purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a human being. One hell of a book! The real stuff that proves the . Robert Leckie's theme is the purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a human being who - somehow - survived' - Tom Hanks.

Leckie's Helmet for my Pillow takes the reader from the hallowed training grounds of Parris Island, through the .

Leckie's Helmet for my Pillow takes the reader from the hallowed training grounds of Parris Island, through the months of chaos and death on Guadalcanal, to the misery and futility of Cape Gloucester, and on to the bloody beaches and airfields of Peleliu. Leave the best till last.

Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific . Written by Robert Leckie. Narrated by John Allen Nelson. In Helmet for My Pillow, we follow his odyssey, from basic training on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. This is a book that brings you as close to the mud, the blood, and the experience of war as it is safe to come.

Helmet for My Pillow is the personal narrative written by World War II United States Marine Corps veteran, author, and military historian Robert Leckie. First published in 1957, the story begins with Leckie's enlisting in the United States Marines shortly after the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

Helmet for My Pillow book. Robert Leckie was 21 when he enlisted in the US Marine Corps in January 1942

Helmet for My Pillow book. Robert Leckie was 21 when he enlisted in the US Marine Corps in January 1942. In Helmet for My Pillow we follow his journey, from boot camp on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, Now the inspiration behind the HBO series THE PACIFIC.

Helmet For My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific is the title of the memoirs of Pfc. Robert Leckie that was written after his participation in the war, which became one of the main sources for the HBO miniseries, The Pacific. According to his wife, Vera Leckie, the book was first conceived in 1951 after Leckie saw a musical broadway show called South Pacific which apparently did not take the Pacific War too seriously.

The Battle of the Tenaru, August 21, 1942 by Robert Leckie. The whisper of the kunai, The murmur of the sea, The sighing palm and night so calm Betray no enemy. Hear!, river bank so silent You men who sleep around That foreign scream across the stream- Up! Fire at the sound! Sweeping over the sandspit That blocks the Tenaru With Banzai-boast a mushroomed host Vows to destroy our few. Into your holes and gunpits! Kill them with rifles and knives!

Here is one of the most riveting first-person accounts ever to come out of World War II. Robert Leckie enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in January 1942, shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. In Helmet for My Pillow, we follow his odyssey, from basic training on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu, Leckie spares no detail of the horrors and sacrifices of war, painting an unvarnished portrait of how real warriors are made, fight, and often die in the defense of their country. From the live-for-today rowdiness of marines on leave to the terrors of jungle warfare against an enemy determined to fight to the last man, Leckie describes what war is really like when victory can only be measured inch by bloody inch. Woven throughout are Leckie's hard-won, eloquent, and thoroughly unsentimental meditations on the meaning of war and why we fight. Unparalleled in its immediacy and accuracy, Helmet for My Pillow will leave no one untouched. This is a book that brings you as close to the mud, the blood, and the experience of war as it is safe to come.Now producers Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, and Gary Goetzman, the men behind Band of Brothers, have adapted material from Helmet for My Pillow for HBO's epic miniseries The Pacific, which will thrill and edify a whole new generation.
Wel
I was given this book by a veteran named Robert Brutinel who had served in the Marine paratroops. He joined in 1942 and arrived on Guadalcanal after the climactic fighting. However, he served on Vella La Vella and Choiseul and then fought in the 5th Division and was wounded on Iwo. When he handed me the book he said, "If you want to know what it was like, this is it." He thought the humor of the book and the camaraderie of the Marines was exactly like what he experienced. So I read the book. To this day, it is my all-time favorite Pacific theater book. And it's right up there, in my opinion, with the Forgotten Soldier on the "all-time best WWII book" shelf (with a handful of others.)

I couldn't help but read some of the critical reviews. I completely disagreed with them. Often they accused the author, Robert Leckie, of having a great resentment toward leadership and authority. I did not find that the case at all. In fact, Leckie often praised officers and had great respect for the good ones. What he couldn't stand, and it shows in his book, is unfair use of power in leadership positions -- also called theft. In almost every instance, be it the cigars LT Ivy-League stole, or the Japanese footlocker stolen by LT Big Picture, Leckie had every right to be angry and I wonder if any of the people who criticized him would have acted any differently.

Another criticized Leckie for drinking and womanizing when he was not in combat. Apparently that reader did not realize that Leckie (just like the thousands of other Marines who took liberty Down Under) had been on Guadalcanal for 5 months, with nothing but death staring him in the face and not a single woman to lay eyes on, and was now on liberty in the very country he had helped save from invasion, knowing he would be going back into combat soon. Leckie was no different than many of the other Marines, just more honest about it. I laughed at the part when a Marine was coming back from a rendezvous with a young Australian girl and commented to Leckie that the Australian girls had no morals. Leckie's comment to that hypocrisy made me laugh.

Helmet for my pillow is the type of book you simply can't put down. And you will be reading it and people in the other room will ask you "What's so funny?" because you often laugh out-loud at the wonderfully entertaining style Leckie uses. But at other times you will be riveted and saddened by the loss of great heroes like LT Racehorse and many others. (May they rest in peace.)

Robert Leckie was truly a gifted writer and it's no wonder he made his career writing for newspapers and then writing best sellers. Fantastic book.
Mojind
A must read for all Americans. This book is a perfect companion to E.B. Sledge's With the Old Breed. Both books chronicle the unrelenting stress, fatigue, brutality, and stygian hell that the 1st Marine Division experienced while fighting a cruel and sadistic Japanese enemy in the pacific theater of war. Leckie's Helmet for my Pillow takes the reader from the hallowed training grounds of Parris Island, through the months of chaos and death on Guadalcanal, to the misery and futility of Cape Gloucester, and on to the bloody beaches and airfields of Peleliu.

Leckie is a truly gifted writer, who delineates not only the common courage, sacrifice and tenacity of the Marines in his unit, but also the banality and awkward humor that can arise between brothers in battle. Both Leckie and Sledge truly avoid the usual politically correct anti-war sentiments found so frequently today. However, these novels do not glorify war in any way. Instead, these books act as a testament to the unbelievable sacrifice and dedication exhibited by a generation of young men committed to protecting their country, The Marine Corps, and to each other, their brothers in arms.
Unh
Agree with all the other enthusiastic reviews. But what puzzled me, why invade Pelelieu? By that point the US controlled the sea lanes why not just blockade the island? Surely the 10,000 Japanese there if not re supplied could not have lasted more than a month. Losing some 7,000 US Marines seems an incredible waste.
Major General William Rupertus, (USMC commander of 1st Marine Division) predicted the island would be secured within four days.[4] However, after repeated Imperial Army losses in previous island campaigns, Japan had developed new island-defense tactics and well-crafted fortifications that allowed stiff resistance,[5] extending the battle through more than two months. In the United States, this was a controversial battle because of the island's questionable strategic value and the high casualty rate, which exceeded that of all other amphibious operations during the Pacific War.[6] The National Museum of the Marine Corps called it "the bitterest battle of the war for the Marines".[7]
Longitude Temporary
If, after reading Ian Toll's terrific trilogy on the Pacific Theater, and watching 'The Pacific' for the umpteenth time, you decide to buy the trilogy of first-hand accounts by Tatum, Leckie and Sledge, read them in that order. Leave the best till last. That's not to say the first is not worth a read, it is; any such first-hand account is worth a read, no matter if it fits with your personal perception of how a book should be written or not. Tatum's is not written like Leckie's, which in turn is not written like Sledge's, yet they each have their character and worth. And if more people read such accounts, the world might just become a more appreciative place for the likes of men who willingly stand up to serve. It might, also, slow down in its rush to war.

Leckie's book, here, is written much like Ambrose Bierce might actually scribe it. Bierce was not everyone's cup of tea, but he saw war and described the cruel consequence of it in a similar way. For that, well done Mr. Leckie, I enjoyed it, a lot. Thank you!
Golkis
I just like reading bits of history from someone's perspective that actually lived it. I thoroughly enjoyed this book because there were details about the actual fighting and boot camp and training but there was also "side stories", for lack of a better term, to help remember that these were real people. They weren't just some made up characters. These were incredible men that made this country great! I thought this book did a great job or portraying just that. And it didn't have all the profanity that some do. All that's not necessary to me. I know how vulgar Marines can be. I don't have to actually read it. I definitely recommend this book.
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