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eBook Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage ePub

by Hazel Rowley

eBook Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage ePub
Author: Hazel Rowley
Language: English
ISBN: 0374158576
ISBN13: 978-0374158576
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (October 26, 2010)
Pages: 368
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 308
Formats: lrf txt lit rtf
ePub file: 1936 kb
Fb2 file: 1296 kb

In Hazel Rowley's engaging new book, Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt come alive anew in all their . I highly recommend this book as an insight into the personalities of two extraordinary people thrust into extraordinary times. One person found this helpful.

In Hazel Rowley's engaging new book, Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt come alive anew in all their complexity, humanity, and greatness. Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Franklin and Winston: An Intimate Portrait of an Epic Friendship. HAZEL ROWLEY was born in London and educated in England and Australia.

Электронная книга "Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage", Hazel Rowley

Электронная книга "Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage", Hazel Rowley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Franklin and Eleanor book. However I was attracted to Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage when I saw it at the library because it I would probably never have bothered to read this book if it hadn’t been written by the noted Australian biographer, Hazel Rowley (1951-2011). For a start, as an Australian I am naturally more interested in reading about our political leaders than American ones, but also I’m not interested in their private lives at all because I believe it’s none of my business, nor anyone else’s.

Franklin Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt's marriage is one of the most celebrated and scrutinized partnerships .

Franklin Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt's marriage is one of the most celebrated and scrutinized partnerships in presidential history. It raised eyebrows in their lifetimes and has only become more controversial since their deaths. She reveals a partnership that was both supportive and daring. Franklin, especially, knew what he owed to Eleanor, who was not so much behind the scenes as heavily engaged in them.

Hazel Rowley profiles the uncommon union of a four-term president and his first lady in Franklin And Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage. Franklin And Eleanor': A Marriage Ahead Of Its Time.

She reveals a partnership that was both supportive and daring.

And I wonder, having now read Hazel Rowley's Franklin and Eleanor: An extraordinary marriage, what she would have made of, say, Joseph and Enid Lyons, Australia's own political power couple. Books, reading and anything else that comes to min. ith an Australian focus.

I know: not another biography of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. After Blanche Weisen Cook, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and Joseph Lash’s serious works, not to mention a bookshelf’s worth of other biographies, memoirs, and tell-alls, what could be left to say about the 32nd President of the United States and his wife? Plenty.

Franklin Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt’s marriage is one of the most celebrated and scrutinized partnerships in presidential history. It raised eyebrows in their lifetimes and has only become more controversial since their deaths. From FDR’s lifelong romance with Lucy Mercer to Eleanor’s purported lesbianism—and many scandals in between—the American public has never tired of speculating about the ties that bound these two headstrong individuals. Some claim that Eleanor sacrificed her personal happiness to accommodate FDR’s needs; others claim that the marriage was nothing more than a gracious façade for political convenience. No one has told the full story until now. In this groundbreaking new account of the marriage, Hazel Rowley describes the remarkable courage and lack of convention—private and public—that kept FDR and Eleanor together. She reveals a partnership that was both supportive and daring. Franklin, especially, knew what he owed to Eleanor, who was not so much behind the scenes as heavily engaged in them. Their relationship was the product of FDR and Eleanor’s conscious efforts—a partnership that they created according to their own ambitions and needs.In this dramatic and vivid narrative, set against the great upheavals of the Depression and World War II, Rowley paints a portrait of a tender lifelong companionship, born of mutual admiration and compassion. Most of all, she depicts an extraordinary evolution—from conventional Victorian marriage to the bold and radical partnership that has made Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt go down in history as one of the most inspiring and fascinating couples of all time.

Delagamand
Am I embarrassed to admit that I saw this book as a local bookstore on the table, and passed it up originally? Yes! I'm an unoffical scholar of our 32nd president and his wife, and admire their work and lives almost as I do this president: Lincoln, Life-Size.

The Roosevelts have a lure over me that I can't quite explain. Perhaps their persistent progressivism, that is so missing in our country today, refreshes. Whatever the case, when I saw the cover of the book on the table, I went over and leafed through a couple of pages ... and then walked on. Why? I thought, "Who needs to read another book on the Roosevelt marriage? Hasn't that been written about before?". The answer is yes, and no. Hazel Rowley's new book is a fresh look at this great couple, and a read that was well-worth my time.

First let me say that this book doesn't uncover any major new revelations. What Crowley has brilliant done is nuanced the current knowledge of the Roosevelts and added much dynamics and commentary to what we already know. For example, any Roosevelt reader knows about the infamous Mercer affair. Covered in this book, Mercer strives to paint a picture of Eleanor after the affair as not distant or unkind, but still caring of her husband. Crowley publishes excerpts of letters between the two that suggest just as much. In fact, when FDR contracts polio, it is Eleanor that nurses her husband, and even sleeps in the window bed beside him.

Crowley also strives to dismantle the common conception of the battle between Sara Roosevelt and Eleanor. While certainly conflicts existed between the two, they were mutually fond of each other. Crowley also presents some letters of fondness between the two women that show their affection. Was it perfect? No. The lives of two strong women are bound to come in conflict, and it did not diminish the feelings between the two. Tour FDR's house in Hyde Park, and a ranger will tell you just as much.

In fact, I ended up purchasing this book on my Kindle for that very purpose. Just prior to Thanksgiving, I had the honor of visiting his house And because I read this interesting book that focused not so much on history, but on love, the Roosevelts came alive for me ever more in that house. It's quite a read for quite a couple, and I cannot recommend it highly enough. This would must a great Christmas present for a Roosevelt fan in your family, or anyone wanting to read about an amazingly complicated marriage.
Mozel
I grew up with my mother's stories about the Rooesvelts. The Fireside Chats, Fala, the CCC, and the numerous Alphabet Corps made me a New Deal Democrat before I knew what that was. I totally remember my mother bringing home margarine with a magenta capsule to knead in to make it butter-like--and this was in the 1950s!
Who didn't love the Roosevelts?

I LOVED this book! What a cleareyed portrait of two flawed human beings who pretty much saved the world as we know it, and made it better for all of us. I followed this book with Doris Kearns Goodwin's No Ordinary Time, and found this one to be the more human, accessible, and well, readable--though I really appreciate Ms Goodwin's excellent scholarship.

I highly recommend this book as an insight into the personalities of two extraordinary people thrust into extraordinary times.
porosh
After reading at least five prior books on the Roosevelts, I never felt satisfied with exactly what their relationship was -- how was it that he had so many seemingly emotionally intimate relationships with other women and she didn't care -- or why was she having such intense emotional attachments to other women, bodyguards and younger son-substitutes? The "serious" biographies emphasized their accomplishments and the history they made. I wanted an emotional biography that went more into what shaped their personalities and produced this unusual relationship. This book delivered that story.

I didn't buy it for a long time because some of the reviews tended to question the author's research, but it is thoroughly footnoted, and was written after the finding of the Daisy Suckley diaries, which are a revelation. I am as satisfied as one can be seeing as how these people lived in Victorian times as young people and subscribed to the emotional and sexual secrecy of that era and all parties involved with this couple did a good job of burning intimate letters and documents.
Marirne
Old enough to remember FDR and Mrs. Roosevelt, left this reader still an admirer, but more realistic. No question that President Roosevelt was the answer to a country's prayers during a trying time for the nation. His answers to a crucial meltdown of our nation's financial and, later, military security, remain with us today and have become, in many's eyes, a birthright and, for many, part of the Bill of Rights! His failure as a husband diminished his many accomplishments as a statesman. Without Eleanor, he would not have been the Icon he has become. Being a politician, he behaved less than honorably in many situations--both politically and personally. Eleanor, as his long-suffering wife had many attributes of her own Without Eleanor, Franklin could not have achieved many of his goals. Franklin's infidelities hurt her terribly. This reader had a problem with admiration and seeing them both as rich dilettantes who, rather condescendingly at times, cared about the "little people". As for FDR's infidelities, Eleanor brought some of this upon herself. She proved to be quite a nag at times. I recommend the book as a portrait of two people, who loved one another in their own, unique fashion.
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