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eBook How to Be a Woman ePub

by Caitlin Moran

eBook How to Be a Woman ePub
Author: Caitlin Moran
Language: English
ISBN: 0091940737
ISBN13: 978-0091940737
Publisher: Ebury (June 1, 2011)
Category: Memoirs
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 246
Formats: mbr doc txt docx
ePub file: 1740 kb
Fb2 file: 1309 kb

Now: Caitlin Moran rewrites The Female Eunuch from a bar stool and demands to know why pants are getting smaller.

Now: Caitlin Moran rewrites The Female Eunuch from a bar stool and demands to know why pants are getting smaller. There’s never been a better time to be a woman: we have the vote and the Pill, and we haven’t been burnt as witches since 1727. However, a few nagging questions do remain. Part memoir, part rant, Caitlin Moran answers these questions and more in How To Be a Woman – following her from her terrible 13th birthday (‘I am 13 stone, have no friends, and boys throw gravel at me when they see me’) through adolescence, the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, Topshop, motherhood and beyond.

In How to Be a Woman - part memoir, part polemic - Caitlin Moran excoriates fashion magazines and women’s reluctance to define .

In How to Be a Woman - part memoir, part polemic - Caitlin Moran excoriates fashion magazines and women’s reluctance to define themselves as feminists. It does not claim to be an academic book ( Feminism is too important to be discussed only by academics ), but Ms. Moran tips her hat to Germaine Greer, whom she imagined to be a stern, shouting thing, based on her father’s references, until she saw her on TV one day and wrote in her diary, I’ve just seen Germaine.

The book's structure loosely follows Moran's life, from child to thirtysomething, with the feminist analysis woven in. .

The book's structure loosely follows Moran's life, from child to thirtysomething, with the feminist analysis woven in between. If you wanted to be picky, there are a few occasions when this analysis doesn't quite work. Her conclusion about pornography is pretty woolly. Festival author Caitlin Moran talks about her book, How to be a Woman, the pleasures of reading about 90s Britpop and why we need to go and see Armageddapocalypse 2: The Explosioning to save her children from starvation. Published: 16 Aug 2011. Caitlin Moran: 'Happiness is someone mentioning the band Salad in an amusing context' - video. Digested read: How to Be a Woman.

How to Be a Woman book. Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them?

How to Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran I’m a feminist, a strident feminist and a male. I have been for a long time. In 1965 I fought against women’s hours, which required college women to be in their dorms by 11:00 . at Indiana University, while men were allowed to roam free all night.

How to Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran I’m a feminist, a strident feminist and a male. I’ve been married to a strident feminist since 1967, and recommend that path to anyone. So I’m reasonably well versed in feminist culture over the years. How to Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran, is, hands down, the best source on feminism I’ve ever encountered. It surely helps that it is hilarious

And do men secretly hate them?Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women’s lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, an. f you want to have this book by Caitlin Moran, Please visit ou.

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I’m adding How to Be a Woman to that list. Everything about this book was funny but also completely RIGHT

I’m adding How to Be a Woman to that list. I’m coming late to the Caitlin Moran party, since I’ve read about her from many bloggers. Everything about this book was funny but also completely RIGHT. Moran takes us from her teenage years to her forties, describing what it means to be a woman every step of the way. There are chapters on sex, shoes, menstruation, breasts, weddings, childbirth, and plastic surgery. There are a bazillion things I wanted to quote from this book, but here are just a few. On sexy underwear: Women wear small underpants because they think they’re sexy.

Utchanat
How to Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran
I’m a feminist, a strident feminist and a male. I have been for a long time. In 1965 I fought against women’s hours, which required college women to be in their dorms by 11:00 p.m. at Indiana University, while men were allowed to roam free all night. I’ve been married to a strident feminist since 1967, and recommend that path to anyone. So I’m reasonably well versed in feminist culture over the years.

How to Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran, is, hands down, the best source on feminism I’ve ever encountered. It surely helps that it is hilarious. It also helps that at least half the barbs are directed at herself, and most of the rest at other women. (Actually, she lets men off pretty easy.) She is shockingly frank about all sorts of socially unacceptable conduct in which she has engaged, such as binge drinking, drug use and promiscuity. But shining through is a deep understanding of things that women routinely experience from puberty through early middle age, and how to live and grow through them. Again and again she raises up values I value.

To make it appropriate to all genders, I would restate her best known quote as: Feminism is believing that if you have a vagina you should be in charge of it.

Her championing of guilt-free abortion is radical, finding it just as appropriate as deciding to bear a child. "By whatever rationale you use, ending a pregnancy 12 weeks into gestation is incalculably more moral than bringing an unwanted child into this world." She quotes a like minded friend: “It’s one of the top four best things I ever did—after marrying my husband, having my son, and getting a fixed quote on the loft conversion.”

The trauma of her first pubic hairs resonates, I assure my female friends, quite fully with me as a male.

I’m not sure quite how old young people should be before reading this book. It does unabashedly relate experiences that will make parents (and grandparents, teachers, etc.) cringe. But I’m not sure that it makes those experiences attractive, and much of what I know of those from 15 to 25 makes me think their culture normalizes such tales so universally that this book only puts them in a real world context that is OK with me. Such stories will be surely old hat to the bulk of college sophomores, and probably to many a high schooler, and too many in middle school.

I’m not sure quite how liberated adults should be before reading this book. I surely have friends who will be shocked that I would recommend such trash. But I do. One person’s trash is another’s treasure. This book is a rare treasure.
SoSok
"So here is the quick way of working out if you're a feminist. Put your hand in your pants.
a) Do you have a vagina? and
b) Do you want to be in charge of it?
If you said 'yes' to both, then congratulations! You're a feminist.”

I read this book as part of a feminist reading club on Goodreads. I had never really thought about being a feminist before. In fact, a feminist to me sounded like one of those red-faced, angry women protesting about something or the other, and always bitching about men. But guess what, being a feminist is about understanding yourself as a woman and defining the role you want to play for yourself in your own life. It's about taking control, it's about asserting our freedoms, and it's about celebrating our interactions with men in a way that is satisfying and fulfilling for both.

Caitlin Moran tells her story in a relatable, humorous, and often irreverent style that did make me stop and think about many issues. Some of her life choices may be questionable, especially in the culture I was raised in, but hey, that's exactly the point. She can --and should-- choose what she believes is right for herself. In the end, I found her courageous for speaking things many of us will shy away from, and to find humor in it too.
Zepavitta
As a 50 year old woman I can look back on my life and see how this book would have been VERY useful to read at age 15. It does not matter if your life is parallel to Ms. Moran's - or not. Actually, that's the point. For once we have a brave woman who is putting her experience out there for the world to see (and laugh about). I applaud her. Anyone who condemns her, condemns her because they are not as brave, honest or true to themselves. As women we have been dictated on how to behave by mostly religious and political members - that have been predominantly men. We need to unapologetically break the glass ceiling and feel the cool wind of change upon our faces. Ms. Moran reminiscences about the confusion of being an adolescent woman through humor, intelligence and tact. It is a journey I thoroughly enjoyed.
OCARO
This is a fun book, often very funny. There are some parts that are thought-provoking and beautifully written: “This is the brutal, root truth of adolescence—that it is often a long, painful campaign of attrition. Those self-harming girls with the latticework of razor cuts on their arms and thighs are just reminding themselves that their body is a battlefield.”

Moran is definitely right that feminism is too important to be discussed only by academics. I think it’s great that female and male celebrities are proud to use the word to describe themselves. Celebrity means a lot in this culture, and if they can help take the stigma away from this word, I say, “Yippee!”

Much of what Moran talks about is the language we use, particularly in regards to women. Because she is British and uses a lot of slang, not all her discussions on language meant a lot to me. I’ve been to England twice and read a lot of British authors, but slang changes quickly, and even here in America I often need someone (Google) to translate Millennials’ English to my Gen-X English.

Many of her thoughts on feminism are similar to mine: “So you don’t want to be owned by your husband? You’re welcome, that was us.” And so on . . .

This is not a fast read, however. It’s at times disjointed, feeling like stream of consciousness thoughts that don’t always seem to logically follow one point to the next. I enjoyed it, but it wasn’t like some books that I simply can’t wait to get back to.
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