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eBook Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy ePub

by Don Henry Ford Jr.,Charles Bowden

eBook Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy ePub
Author: Don Henry Ford Jr.,Charles Bowden
Language: English
ISBN: 0060883103
ISBN13: 978-0060883102
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (June 27, 2006)
Pages: 240
Category: Regional U.S.
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 313
Formats: docx mbr lrf lit
ePub file: 1205 kb
Fb2 file: 1869 kb

Don Henry Ford, J. is an unapologetic outlaw. I wrote Contrabando with a hammer, a crescent wrench, a pair of vice grips and a single slot bladed screw driver.

Don Henry Ford, J. For seven years he made his living smuggling marijuana across the . His business partners were some of the era's biggest narcotraficantes like Pablo Acosta and Amado Carrillo Fuentes. After Ford was arrested and imprisoned.

Don Henry Ford, Jr. is a Texas cowboy, rancher and farmer

Don Henry Ford, Jr. is a Texas cowboy, rancher and farmer. Start by marking Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Charles Bowden (author of "Down by the River," Simon & Schuster, 2003) has written a remarkable introduction to "Contrabando," giving an historical perspective to the never-ending war on drugs waged by the . In December 1986, the feds caught Don Henry Ford a second time. He was sentenced to 15 years in a maximum security federal penitentiary. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Download now Contrabando : confessions of a drug-smuggling Texas cowboy Don Henry Ford, J. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Keywords for this story

Keywords for this story. Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy, Don Henry Ford J. Cincos Puntos Press. is the author of Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy, published by Cinco Puntos Press

Don Henry Ford, Jr. is the author of Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy, published by Cinco Puntos Press. Charles Bowden is the author of the novel A Shadow in the City: Confessions of an Undercover Drug Warrior, published by Harcourt. Alicia Gaspar de Alba is the author of the novel Desert Blood: The Juarez Murders, published by Arte Publico Press. Joaquin Jackson is the author of One Ranger: A Memoir, published by University of Texas Press. Luis Alberto Urrea talked about immigration and his book, The Devil’s Highway: A True Story, published by Little, Brown.

Contrabando: Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy. ISBN 13: 9780938317852. Publication Date: 10/1/2004. Don Henry Ford, J.

Confessions of a Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy. by Don Henry Ford Jr. Published June 27, 2006 by Harper Paperbacks. The year is 1980, and I am 23 years old. The Physical Object.

Contrabando : Confessions Of A Drug-Smuggling Texas Cowboy. By (author) Don Henry Jr. Ford. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Don Henry Ford, Jr., is an unapologetic outlaw. For seven years he made his living smuggling marijuana across the U.S.-Mexico border in the Big Bend region of Texas. His business partners were some of the era's biggest narcotraficantes like Pablo Acosta and Amado Carrillo Fuentes. After Ford was arrested and imprisoned, he escaped and lived for a year in rural Mexico, raising a bumper crop of weed and hiding out from the federales, before his recapture and return to the penitentiary.

Contrabando is the extraordinary, unabashed memoir of a rebel -- a warrior on the other side of the War on Drugs who lived to tell the tale. But more than a riveting and remarkable true crime confession, Contrabando is an ode to the beauty of the dry, dusty West Texas plains and the lonely hills of Mexico -- and a tribute to Ford's friends, protectors, and fellow outlaws who stood by him during the dangerous smuggling years.

Simple fellow
Once I started reading, I couldn't put it down and I did not until I finished it. Knowing the background of the hard-working people he came from and growing up in that same era and areas, it was like peering in a window and watching another world that I had only heard about whispered with girlfriends. I am grateful for the glimpse from Mr. Ford, as I know how painful the retelling must be for all, and hopefully cathartic as well. I could not imagine living in that drug culture or being a part of that desperation, growing up a wide-eyed and naive small-town girl at that time. I only knew the rumors of those that did, somewhat in awe at their audacity, like local versions of a forbidden rock star in some ways. What a tough character he was and a parents nightmare! The high stress of living such a life would seem to exact a heavy toll and the authors words conveyed a dilemma of ethics in a world where little seemed to exist. Yet I found myself oddly cheering him on and wanting him to succeed and be redeemed in the end, not admiring the lifestyle but appreciating the experience without having to live it. I felt for his family and children and all they must have endured. I was sad when the book ended as I felt there should be a neat and happy ending somehow, and hope it is as best it can be. The reader is left with a sense of lessons learned and regrets to overcome from the author (maybe part two?), yet a hope for a better life for he and his family. Good luck to the author and his family and I looking forward to reading some of his other books.
Lilegha
Day before yesterday, I received a couple of copies of Contrabando, the original hard-backed version. For whatever reason, I picked up the book and began reading. It's been long enough that it was almost, (but not entirely), like reading the work of another.

I felt like I needed a marking pencil. The writing is stilted and disjointed in places. I found repititions. Inaccuracies. But the story behind the words still has value. It's a flawed depiction taken from the front lines of this so-called war on drugs which is really a war on people. A flawed version of one that has actually been there is better than a well written version of those that have not.

Stephen King compared the skills needed to write a book to a box of tools. He went on to say if a person has a good story, they can write a decent book with a minimal amount of tools

I wrote Contrabando with a hammer, a crescent wrench, a pair of vice grips and a single slot bladed screw driver. I needed more tools.

I won't try to rewrite the book. Life has moved on; I've better and more timely subjects to address.

Ray Wylie Hubbard once said, be careful about the song you write because you might still be singing it thirty years later. To this day, Ray gets requests to sing up against the wall red-neck mother, quite possibly the worst song he ever wrote.

I know how he feels.
Arcanefire
I've never seen the drug world, but I know some people Don knows and have had some similar experiences (membership in the A&M Corps about 10 years later, farm work, and more than a few days spent in South Texas on a deer lease. My personal experience is, like an earlier reviewer stated, a bollillo who speaks the language and obviously respects the culture gets along fine. Based on this, my guess is his less legal activities probably are portrayed accurately as well.

Ford comments about how he wished he'd been a better writer when he wrote this...but the story is so compelling, it shines through. In fact, I might have enjoyed the book less if he'd been trying for Shakespeare. Approach the book as if a friend was telling his story over a few beers, and you won't be able to put the book down.

Don, if you're reading this, I hope your son got his head straight and is doing OK now.
Nern
Yet another book that proves beyond a doubt what a freaking joke the 'war on drugs' is, and of the lives it destroys. Truly sad that this kind of crap happens in my country, and so many of us are completely clueless. SMH.

An incredibly well-told story.
Nnulam
Don is brutally honest in his writing. I wasn't sure if this was going to be a glorified self-gratifying piece on what he was able to get a way with, but was surprised and intrigued to find out how honest and raw Don's accounts of his former life were. This was a hard one to put down and anyone familiar with the rough west Texas landscapes will appreciate his descriptions. All-in-all, this was a book that I picked up with low expectations and couldn't put down until the very end. Loved every minute and learned some interesting details about life in the northern Mexican deserts and west Texas.
Joony
this book is kidn of a quick read but good. i love all true crime books especially about smuggling. i enjoyed this. there are better smuggling books out ther like snowblind but this is a good read. was a bit expensive though for what a short read it was.
Paster
I'm enjoying this book, it is a page turner.
If this book would have had the proper marketing it would have easily been a best seller !
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