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eBook Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside ePub

by Bridget Kinsella

eBook Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside ePub
Author: Bridget Kinsella
Language: English
ISBN: 0307338363
ISBN13: 978-0307338365
Publisher: Crown; 1 edition (June 12, 2007)
Pages: 272
Category: Specific Groups
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 782
Formats: docx mobi azw doc
ePub file: 1172 kb
Fb2 file: 1841 kb

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Kinsella, though, seems less willing to go as deep as Rory or the women she profiles do in revealing those issues but still presents a powerful story. If you have dealings with inmates or criminals on the streets this book is laughable. It's not a thing of romance or fantasy

Kinsella, though, seems less willing to go as deep as Rory or the women she profiles do in revealing those issues but still presents a powerful story. Her work has appeared in publications such as the Chicago Tribune and Writer’s Digest, and on NPR and Salon. It's not a thing of romance or fantasy. To the readers who enjoyed this book, tour your local jail or prison. You'll see a totally different side of your community.

This discussion with the author aired on a 2007 episode of "Conversations On The Coast with Jim Foster" originating in San Francisco, California. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Her work has appeared in publications such as the Chicago Tribune and Writer’s Digest, and on NPR and Salon. She lives in Northern California. Библиографические данные. Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside.

When a friend who taught creative writing at a maximum-security prison asked Bridget Kinsella to read the work of one of his best students, she readily agreed. As a publishing professional, Kinsella was used to getting manuscripts from all sorts of sources. She had no idea that her correspondence with a convicted murderer serving life without parole would lead to a relationship that would change her life forever.

Women Doing Time on the Outside. The first time I walked into a maximum-security prison I dressed like a lawyer–though it wasn’t my intention

Women Doing Time on the Outside. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. Excerpt: Visiting Life. The first time I walked into a maximum-security prison I dressed like a lawyer–though it wasn’t my intention. Let’s just say there are lots of rules about what a woman can and cannot wear inside a men’s maximum-security prison: no inmate-blue denim and no cop-green khaki seemed the most important ones. I figured it best to have a modest hemline and thought to-the-knee was plenty modest.

Kinsella's portraits of many of the other women visiting men in the same prison are haunting, sympathetic and initially as suspicious as most readers would be. This is a story about Kinsella's process for healing old wounds that haunted her for years and hindered her ability to trust and t. .

Impatient readers who anonymously tell her to "just get on with it" seem to miss the whole point of the book.

bridget kinsella, visiting life: women doing time on the outside. Years have passed, almost ten years now since I first met Shane. If memory is a fiction and our identity the result of the stories we tell ourselves, how can we ever know the truth of our own lives? -tristine rainer, your life as story. After all was said and done, my friend Dorothy, shaking her head in disbelief, said, I still can’t believe you thought that story was going to have a happy ending. But I did. For the longest time I did.

She is the author of the bestselling nonfiction book, Visiting Life: Women Doing Time on the Outside.

She attended Rutgers University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She taught journalism at the State University of New York at Purchase before moving west to restart her life

women doing time on the outside. 1st ed. by Bridget Kinsella. Published 2007 by Harmony Books in New York. Hurricanes and earthquakes.

When a friend who taught creative writing at a maximum-security prison asked Bridget Kinsella to read the work of one of his best students, she readily agreed. As a publishing professional, Kinsella was used to getting manuscripts from all sorts of sources. Who knows? she told herself. Maybe I can help this talented inmate get his work published. She had no idea that her correspondence with a convicted murderer serving life without parole would lead to a relationship that would change her life forever. Why in the world would anyone get involved with a prison inmate? In this beautifully written, brutally honest memoir, Kinsella shares how she stumbled into a relationship with a lifer and became part of a sorority she never thought she’d join. Over the course of three years, she spends time with and ultimately befriends the wives, girlfriends, and mothers of some inmates at Pelican Bay. On this unexpected journey, she learns of the hurdles, heartbreaks, and hopes they have for their relationships as she experiences a connection with someone who helps heal her own wounds. As the United States continues to incarcerate convicted criminals for increasingly long periods of time, our prison rolls swell to unprecedented levels—more than two million today—as does the number of women and children whose lives are thrown into limbo and who live for their next “visiting time.” Through the lens of her own unlikely experience, Kinsella examines those impacted by crime and punishment with keen observation, candor, and compassion.
Umdwyn
I liked this book and even found myself emotionally involved at a few points. But one thing is missing in this book. Her dedication to Rory. Although she tries to show herself as a man in love with a lifer, she never really gives into Rory and becomes his wife. She always keeps him at arms length.
So, I reserve the right to say that she can't really tell us what it is like to have a husband or boyfriend on the inside.
She doesn't have the level of commitment that I and other women who love these men have.
With a good job, she doesn't juggle work, school, children, and visits.
She doesn't know what its like to go through the things that women really do.
She include some other women in the book, but somehow they are all less than she is. In many cases she makes them seem naive or less than desirable to anyone but an inmate.
It reminds me of another book, Nickled and Dimed, where the author pretended to be poor for awhile and then went back to her normal life. This is my normal life. I don't have another one waiting for me somewhere.
MisTereO
I was heartened to see so many books out by / about women who love men in prison and this one is good, it just seems too much like the "relationship" was persued all along, as part of her plan to research and write a book about the experience. (I know it's an old joke but the chicken "contributes" an egg while the pig committs to giving a slice of bacon) And I'm uncertain about her motivation for getting close to and reporting on the other women who visit. What, exactly, is her long term committment?
Whatever the research, Visiting life is about the life of "lifer's" wives and girlfriends, a "sorority" of women I know because I was once a member. Now I am a wife of a parolee and "we" are fortunate since the relationship lasted on the outside. I do miss the closeness of the women I knew when visiting, since in the "free world" women find themselves with few friends they can really talk to about their experience since parolees can't "associate" with other parolees and no couples friendships are allowed without the danger of the parole being revoked. It's hard to maintain friendships with women who understand your experience, since, once out, the Parole department dominates his life and yours and intrudes far more than you ever expected, especially if it's now a "life supervision" parole. Every "visiting" wife and girlfriend fantacizes about life once her husband /friend leaves prison and they have a chance for a life together, on the "Out side". It takes time and patience to find your balance again, to know who you both are, once living together in the "free world", once he gets out and day to day reality intervenes with parole restrictions and the prejudice of the public. It was worth all we went through, but not easy. The real tragedy is watching women friends whose husbands never get out and what the loss of all hope of a "free" future does to them and their husbands as they gradually realize they will both die on different sides of the wall.
Bil
I found this book to be terrible. The author reminded me of Cheryl Stayed (whose book "Wild" I wanted to burn.) She is talking about how beautiful she is, successful, etc but after Googling her...that's a huge negative. My ex-husband came out to me, so I get the confusion of how it makes you question yourself as a woman. But realize that it's not you, it's him. She should have let that go along time ago. The obsession with wanting a child....? I found that to be grating. Adopt (I believe she mentions that wasn't an "option" for her) or use one of the methods that exist for being able to get pregnant.

The whole Rory angle I found to be pathetic and lame. If the author is so popular, successful, beautiful, sparkling, etc why is she having to find fulfillment in an inmate? The jargon she writes of him finding parallels in their lives (the number nine, etc) is classic prison fodder; inmates grasping at straws to keep the attention of a female.

If you have dealings with inmates or criminals on the streets this book is laughable. It's not a thing of romance or fantasy. To the readers who enjoyed this book, tour your local jail or prison. You'll see a totally different side of your community.

But at the same time...realize here she is, pushing forty, not finding any "suitable" men to date, childless, clinging to a divorce...she's the perfect candidate for a prisoner to seduce.
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