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eBook Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood ePub

by James Gleick

eBook Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood ePub
Author: James Gleick
Language: English
ISBN: 0007225741
ISBN13: 978-0007225743
Publisher: Fourth Estate; 1 edition (March 1, 2012)
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Building
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 296
Formats: lrf docx doc lrf
ePub file: 1341 kb
Fb2 file: 1739 kb

The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood is a book by science history writer James Gleick published in March 2011 which covers the genesis of our current information age.

The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood is a book by science history writer James Gleick published in March 2011 which covers the genesis of our current information age. It was on The New York Times best-seller list for three weeks following its debut. The Information has also been published in ebook formats by Fourth Estate and Random House, and as an audiobook by Random House Audio.

But James Gleick pulls it of. gracefully written book. A book about everythin. leick sees the world as an endlessly unfolding opportunity in which ‘creatures of the information’ might just recognize themselves. An interesting and detailed history of how we’ve moved from an alphabet to words, writing, dictionaries, etc.

The Information book.

You only need to read a few pages of this book – which opens with tales of African drumming – to realise what a sweeping and monumental task Gleick has set himself. What we know as "information" – such a familiar concept to us now – took a long, long time to develop.

Электронная книга "The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood", James Gleick

Электронная книга "The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood", James Gleick. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. by James Gleick · Claude Shannon · John J. Carty · Jean-Pierre Dupuy · Charles Babbage · Ada Lovelace · Jacob Palme. Ada, the Enchantress of Numbers: A Selection from the Letters of Lord Byron's Daughter and Her Description of the First Computer. by Ada Lovelace · Betty Alexandra Toole. A revision of the life and.

In ‘The Information’ James Gleick tells the story of how human beings use, transmit and keep what they know. Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books 2012, the world's leading prize for popular science writing. We live in the information age.

ГлавнаяИсторическая литератураJames GleickThe Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

ГлавнаяИсторическая литератураJames GleickThe Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood.

Its mushrooming from an esoteric theory in communications technology during the 1940s to current pundits’ declaration that ours is the information age is the core of James Gleick’s narrative. Information is everywhere, he intones, pervading the sciences from top to bottom, transforming every branch of knowledge. It supplies the blood and the fuel, the vital principle, that runs our world (p. 8). Through its lenses, we even can re-write our history.

Gleick, James. The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. London, Fourth Estate, 2012. 13 cm x 20 cm. 527 pages. With several illustrations. Original softcover. Excellent condition with only minor signs of external wear. Some underlining by preowner on several pages. Otherwise clean inside with solid binding. Includes the following chapters: Drums That Talk / The Persistence of the Word / Two Wordbooks / To Throw the Powers of Thought into Wheel-Work / A Nervous System for the Earth / Information Theory / Into the Meme Pool / New News Every Day etc. Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books 2012, the world's leading prize for popular science writing. We live in the information age. But every era of history has had its own information revolution: the invention of writing, the composition of dictionaries, the creation of the charts that made navigation possible, the discovery of the electronic signal, the cracking of the genetic code. In 'The Information' James Gleick tells the story of how human beings use, transmit and keep what they know. From African talking drums to Wikipedia, from Morse code to the 'bit', it is a fascinating account of the modern age's defining idea and a brilliant exploration of how information has revolutionised our lives. (Amazon) James Gleick (born August 1, 1954) is an American author and historian of science whose work has chronicled the cultural impact of modern technology. Recognized for his writing about complex subjects through the techniques of narrative nonfiction, he has been called 'one of the great science writers of all time'. Gleick's books include the international bestsellers Chaos: Making a New Science (1987) and The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood (2011). Three of his books have been Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalists; and The Information was awarded the PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award in 2012 and ..
Legend 33
As someone who has been in computers and information sciences since 1970, this was an amazing and entertaining book.
I knew a lot of the history, having lived some of it, but a lot of this was new to me.
Very well-researched and presented in a clear and highly readable style. This volume clearly covers the concepts and development of theories of information. It covers both theory and practice and whether you are a beginning computer programmer or an information science theorist, you should find something in here that you didn't know and that will awaken you to some new ideas.

If you like this volume, try "Godel, Escher, Bach" by Douglas Hofstadter. That is an eclectic and entertaining mix of mathematics, art, and music philosophy, tying together apparently dissimilar disciplines into a mind-bending tour-de-force.
Mori
The is the first James Gleick work that I have read. I am impressed. He writes cleanly and clearly, with little "fluff" and he seems to understand what he is writing about. It surely took a lot of background work before he was ready to tie so many disparate pieces of history together. I am also impressed in that Mr Gleick seems clearly to want to get the history right and not to push his personal ideas, interpretations, morals, and politics. I am reminded of the James Burke (BBC/PBS) works as he shows how knowledge that at first seems unrelated becomes related thru the work of many men and women scattered in time and geography. This is a history, not a textbook on information theory; there is only a smattering of simple formulae and drawings.

The book uses the contributions of Claude Shannon as a thread to tie everyone's work together, but this is not a biography of Claude Shannon.

The final chapters are a bit weak in my opinion, especially following such solid work as the preceding chapters. One of the weak (in my opinion) chapters is devoted entirely to Wikipedia. I am enthused with Wikipedia but I don't think it is yet clear what will be a future historian's view of Wikipedia and that it deserves its own full chapter.

Overall I found the book to be very enjoyable and educational, adding considerably to my previous knowledge of Mr Shannon's work and bringing me new knowledge of how Mr Shannon's work linked with the work of others to bring us our current "information age."
Quashant
I wondered what aspect of information Gleick would be treating - knowledge and its communication and storage, the rise of information in physics as a conceptual inverse to entropy and its engagement in black hole theory, or even the information age.

My complete satisfaction with Gleick's past work, especially the thoroughness of his notes and his eclectic exposition, compelled me to preorder this book. The Information is all of the above and more. He presents a history, including the fundamentals of language as, for example, employed for millennia by African drummers, then traverses the history of writing (even spelling), difference and analysis engines to the evolution of telegraphs and telephony. The theory then champions the work of Godel, Turing, Shannon, von Neumann and Wiener as information takes on a physical context and leaps into the age of digital logic. Gleick's notes became my list for texts to further read around the topic. Then comes the flood, the rise on the internet, Wiki and the cloud.

The Information is a rewarding and enjoyable read and contains many of the charming minutiae that Gleick's research uncovers. As he listed the objectives of Russell and Whitehead's Principia Mathematica and its imminent demolition, Gleick describes the early days of the demolisher, Godel, attending smoky Viennese coffee houses and expounding logic. Highly recommended.
Winn
There are two milestones that shape the main theses in this book. The first is, naturally, Claude Shannon's formulation of his "Information Theory". Shannon is rightfully the main character of this historical saga (Gleick inserts biographical snippets of him and other main character throughout the book). The second pivotal moment comes with the intrusion of entropy in this theory and in the realization that information, as a physical entity, is also subjected to it.

Gleick is a great writer and a pleasure to read. He presents his topic thematically, chronologically, and inserting biographical elements to shape something like an informational saga. He not only engages the reader but also explain difficult concepts in great detail (his presentation of Gödel's incompleteness theorems is an example.)

With an intermixture of Entropy and Information Gleick discusses the most important issue from a human perspective: how to extract knowledge and wisdom from a flood of data. It is very interesting to realize that our modern discussion is just a last iteration of searching and filtering. From library indexing, book catalogs, almanacs through our modern Internet algorithms, the problem remains the same: when all information is available, how do you find it and when does it become meaningful? The author is right in using Borges's "The Library of Babel" as the perfect metaphor for it.
Mr.Twister
This book was hard to get through but only because there was so many incredibly important ideas. I read this months ago and I am still thinking about it. The part I disliked? That there was almost no actual communications research presented. All (or all but a tiny bit) came from engineering or computer science. University communications departments have ceded the entirety of modern communications theory and practice to others. And the worst part is that they don't even care or seem aware of that fact. So... my review of the book? Read it. It is fascinating and one of the most important books to read if you want to get a good, basic overview of the ideas that will shape the next 50 years or more. If you are affiliated with any university department of communications you should be ashamed for a bit and then start fixing the last 50 years of irrelevancy this book clearly has exposed.
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