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eBook The Little Lame Prince and The Adventures of a Brownie ePub

by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik,Lucille Corcos

eBook The Little Lame Prince and The Adventures of a Brownie ePub
Author: Dinah Maria Mulock Craik,Lucille Corcos
Language: English
ISBN: 0448060175
ISBN13: 978-0448060170
Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap (September 1, 1948)
Pages: 327
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Children
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 102
Formats: azw lit doc mobi
ePub file: 1434 kb
Fb2 file: 1556 kb

He could have looked at her forever-half in love, half in awe; but shesuddenly dwindled down into the little old woman all in gray, and, witha malicious twinkle in her eyes, asked for the traveling-cloak

Kind little Brownie! clever little Brownie!" cried the children inchorus, and thought this was the most astonishing trick he. .Other author's books: The Little Lame Prince and His Travelling Cloak. The Adventures of A Brownie. The Little Lame Prince.

Kind little Brownie! clever little Brownie!" cried the children inchorus, and thought this was the most astonishing trick he had everplayed. What the Gardener's wife said about it, whether they told her any thing,or allowed her to suppose that the clothes had been done in their ownlaundry instead of the Brownie's (wherever that establishment might be),is more than I can tell. The Laurel Bush: An Old-Fashioned Love Story.

The adventures of a brownie. Brownie and the cook. Immediately Brownie changed himself into the smallest mouse possible;and, taking care not to make the least noise, gnawed a hole in the door,and squeezed himself through, immediately turning into his proper shapeagain, for fear of accidents. The kitchen fire was at its last glimmer; but it showed a better supperthan even last night, for the Cook had had friends with her-a brotherand two cousins-and they had been exceedingly merry.

Includes other stories: The Invisible prince - Prince Cherry - The Prince with a nose.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Includes other stories: The Invisible prince - Prince Cherry - The Prince with a nose.

She was born at Stoke-on-Trent and brought up in, Staffordshire. After the death of her mother in 1845, Dinah Maria Mulock settled in London about 1846.

Dinah Maria Mulock Craik. The Adventures of A Brownie, As Told to My Child by Miss Mulock. Dinah Maria Mulock Craik. John Halifax, Gentleman. THERE was once a little Brownie, who lived-where do you think he lived? in a coal-cellar. The Little Lame Prince and His Travelling Cloak' by Miss Mulock with pictures by hope dunlap'The Little Lame Prince and His Travelling Cloak' by Miss Mulock with pictures by hope dunlap. 254. Published: 2014.

FOR the little Brownie, though not given to horsemanship, did once takea ride, and a very remarkable one it was. Shall I tell you all about it? The six little children got a present of something they had longed forall their lives-a pony

FOR the little Brownie, though not given to horsemanship, did once takea ride, and a very remarkable one it was. Shall I tell you all about it? The six little children got a present of something they had longed forall their lives-a pony. Not a rocking-horse, but a real live pony-aShetland pony, too, which had traveled all the way from the ShetlandIsles to Devonshire-where every body wondered at it, for such acreature had not been seen in the neighborhood for years and years

The Little Lame Prince is a story for children written by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik (1826-1887) and first published in 1875. In the story, the young Prince Dolor, whose legs are paralyzed due to a childhood trauma, is exiled to a tower in a wasteland. As he grows older, a fairy godmother provides a magical travelling cloak so he can see, but not touch, the world. He uses this cloak to go on various adventures, and develops great wisdom and empathy in the process. Finally he becomes a wise and compassionate ruler of his own land. Grosset & Dunlap published a series of literary classics which they called the Illustrated Junior Library which included this title. Providing children with quality reading material that is also pleasing to the eye is a great way to encourage reading. Kids will naturally bury themselves in this classic with its full-color plate illustrations and clear type that reads smoothly. A different illustrator was chosen for each volume based on their ability to adequately evoke a specific text. The illustrator of Little Lame Prince, Lucille Corcos (1908-1973) was a renowned artist, known as the doyenne of the "modern primitivist" trend on the American art scene. Her paintings, with their composite urban scenes, are often views into various buildings that the observer generally sees only from the outside and in passing; Corcos turns them inside-out before the eye of the viewer. The work is literally "revealing." As such, it is touching, witty, and thoroughly delightful to contemplate. Though Corcos paid little heed to conventions of scale and perspective, her work is far from abstract, and her renderings are painterly and nuanced and add whimsy to The Little Lame Prince's text. This Junior Illustrated title is hard to find.
Jarortr
Our big kid (age 7) is a great reader. She still enjoys family story time, but the writing is on the wall--we are not going to be reading to her at bedtime forever. Needed to bring the A game, and Howard Pyle's Robin Hood absolutely qualified. The chapters are self-contained stories, with lots of swashbuckling and physical comedy, and a ton of stylized word play that she really got a kick out of, even if we needed to sometimes translate. The whole family is now saying "Methinks" and "Forsooth". Also, we are considering beginning a theft ring.
Lonesome Orange Kid
The Howard Pyle version of The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood seemed to be the version with the most editions available, so I figured that would be a good starting place for Robin Hood stories. Silly me once again forgot that I had already purchased the Audible version of the book (the Audible version is not free, but I think I got it as a daily deal or something) and got the Kindle version too. Since the Kindle version is a cheap edition of a really old book, I did not particularly expect the Kindle and audiobooks to sync up, but they actually did pretty well together.

John Lee does a great job with the narration, voicing everybody from the evil Guy of Gisbourne to the shifty Sheriff of Nottingham with fine distinction. He even sings all the many songs in the book in character very well. According to the section in the Kindle book about the author (this part was not in the audiobook version) Howard Pyle based his version of the Robin Hood stories on a 1795 collection of ballads, so nearly every tale, especially in the first part of the book, has a merry song or two in it.

Apparently, there is no original manuscript to base a rendition of the Robin Hood stories on so this collection of ballads may be as close to an original source as we are likely to get. In consequence, while the language of these stories has a suitably Medieval cast to it, it is nevertheless reasonably easy to understand. It’s not like trying to read Middle English or anything.

And yet, the stories are set in a time when Middle English would not have been so far off the mark. This collection actually focuses on a time period somewhat earlier than the more recent popular renditions of Robin Hood in the movies. Throughout most of the book, the King is King Henry II. In fact, Henry and his Queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, appear in a couple of the stories. Queen Eleanor sponsors Robin Hood and some of his men in a tournament, and King Henry, upset that they have beaten some of his favorites, hunts them all over the north of England. This must have been during the time Henry and Eleanor weren’t getting along so well.

There were many stories in this book that I had not heard before, or barely heard references to somewhere. And a lot of the stories found in recent renditions of Robin Hood are not there. For instance, Maid Marian is mentioned about three times as the girl Robin Hood loves best, but her story is not told at all. Instead, we have the story of Allan A Dale and his true love, Ellen, and how Robin Hood saved fair Ellen from marrying an old knight so that she could marry the minstrel instead. Guy of Gisbourne is not a knight but another outlaw with an evil reputation whom the Sheriff of Nottingham has hired to kill Robin Hood. And it is King Richard who, after his father’s death and his own accession to the throne, finally catches Robin Hood – and takes him into his personal service.
Buriwield
The original text is preserved and generally fornatted well, but the illustrations are not Howard Pyle's and are frankly very poor. I cannot overstate how bad they are. Computer generated, irrelevant to the story, and lacking any interesting detail.
If you are going to buy the classic Howard Pyle version of the legend, I strongly encourage you to only buy an edition with Howard Pyle as the illustrator.
Tolrajas
I am reading this with my 8 year old daughter and I love how she is learning to read and understand a rich text. A "right stout yeoman" and "cudgel" are just a sample of the writings. It is amazing how modern stories have been "dumbed down" for today's children. You won't be disappointed with that in this book. My only complaint so far (we are about 8 chapters into it) is that we've lost our picture pages. There will be a big box of white space where you know the picture should be, but no picture. Disappointing for sure. I would also caution that this is not the Disney version of Robin Hood. The Merry Men drink ale, lie, steal, fight and do other things that you may or may not agree with. I find it a good talking point for my daughter.
Mozel
Didn't know how I would fee about this book as I should have read it when I was much younger, but I thoroughly enjoyed it, especially for its light deft touch on the man, his associates and his stories. Pyle, who was actually an illustrator who took this and other stories and adapted them for young people, did just that with Robin Hood, creating most definitely an unreal happy-go-lucky, gentle thief who lives in the woods and takes from the rich "to give to the poor."

The stories are funny, light and easy to read (only some old English to contend with). If you're looking for a break from the violent, blood, serious or supernatural, here is a good choice.
Levaq
This is the most beautifully written fairy tale I have ever read. It has sunk into my soul and will never be forgotton. My grandmother had a hardback copy that literally fell to dust, due to high-acid paper and much handling. Now that I am a grandmother, I feel a strong loving to pass this wonderful book on to every child in my family.
Winasana
This was the first time I ever liked an audiobook SO much that I sought out the buy the printed book, and I wanted it specifically to read the songs. It's a very light-hearted book, and can be read quickly if you gloss over all the "thee, thou, dost" language, but that is part of what, for me, makes it so charming. You mostly follow Robin and his merry men on their adventures, and there is not much character development or dynamics, but this book abounds with wit, woodland metaphors, and (sometimes) clever pranks.
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