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eBook Tales from Silver Lands ePub

by Charles J. Finger

eBook Tales from Silver Lands ePub
Author: Charles J. Finger
Language: English
ISBN: 0590424475
ISBN13: 978-0590424479
Publisher: Apple; Wavy Pages, strictly reading Copy edition (June 1, 1989)
Subcategory: Children
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 961
Formats: lrf doc txt mobi
ePub file: 1873 kb
Fb2 file: 1148 kb

Tales from Silver Lands book. Tales from Silver Lands is a collection of nineteen folktales, which Finger collected during his travels in South America.

Tales from Silver Lands book. In them an assortment of animals, magical creatures, witches, giants, and children struggle for a life in which good overcomes evil. These fast-moving and adventuresome fantasies provide insight into the values and culture of native South American Tales from Silver Lands is a collection of nineteen folktales, which Finger collected during his travels in South America.

Tales from Silver Lands by Charles J. Finger won the John Newbery Award in 1925. I didn't know anything about the book when I picked it up other than it's Newbery, but I must say, I was quite pleasantly surprised by what I found. I have always loved Fairy Tales

Tales from Silver Lands by Charles J. I have always loved Fairy Tales. Like, a lot. If you remember, a few weeks ago I talked about my first experience reading Grimm's Fairy Tales, which helped cement my love for reading them as well

Charles J. Finger heard the tales firsthand from native storytellers, whose fables of talking animals, witches, giants, and ordinary people in supernatural settings provide remarkable insights into regional values and culture

Charles J. Finger heard the tales firsthand from native storytellers, whose fables of talking animals, witches, giants, and ordinary people in supernatural settings provide remarkable insights into regional values and culture. The first of the stories, A Tale of Three Tails, tells of an age when the rat had a tail like a horse, the rabbit had a tail like a cat, and the deer's tail was plumed like the tail of a dog. The Magic Dog recounts an act of kindness to a stray animal that helps overcome a witch's curse

Charles J. Finger heard the tales firsthand from native storytellers, whose fables of talking animals, witches, giants, and ordinary .

Charles J. In addition to his 1925 Newbery Medal-winning Tales from Silver Lands, Finger's books include Bushrangers, Tales Worth Telling, Courageous Companions, A Dog at His Heel, and an autobiography, Seven Horizons. Библиографические данные. Tales from Silver Lands.

Finger won the 1925 Newbery Medal for the book Tales from Silver Lands (1924), a collection of stories from Central and . "Information About Charles J. Finger", "Charles J. Finger Papers" (finding aid), University of Arkansas Libraries (libinfo. Retrieved 2016-06-04.

Finger won the 1925 Newbery Medal for the book Tales from Silver Lands (1924), a collection of stories from Central and South America. Some of his other works are Bushrangers (1924), Tales Worth Telling (1927), Courageous Companions (1929), and A Dog at His Heel (1936). His autobiography is Seven Horizons (1930). The collection includes "Correspondence and Papers of Helen Finger Leflar and Others". Helen Finger illustrated children's books including some written by her father. Evidently she was his literary executor.

Tales from Silver Lands - Charles J. Finger. Now in that land there was a hunter with whom neither lasso nor arrow ever failed, and he had two sons, beautiful to look at and brave of heart, stout and quick of foot. A tale of three tails. Not only did the brothers work better than any men had ever worked, but they could play ball and sing, throwing the ball higher than birds could fly, and singing in a way that brought the wild things to hear them.

In the Lee Walp Family Juvenile Book Collection, Gift of the Lee Walp Family. Lee Walp's clippings, notes, etc. laid in. Newbery Medal, 1925. Presents a series of stories about animals, magic, witches, giants, and other beings from Central and South America.

Tales from Silver Lands is a book by Charles Finger that won the Newbery Medal in 1925. Tales from Silver Lands is a book by Charles Finger that won the Newbery Medal in 1925. The book is a collection of nineteen folktales of the native populations of Central and South America. These interesting folk stories include tales about giants, witches, and animals.

FInger won the 1925 Newbery Medal for the book Tales from Silver Lands (1924), a collection of stories from South America.

Tales from Silver Lands is a collection of nineteen folktales, which Finger collected during his travels in South . This book has a collection of South American folk tales about witches, etc. It is written very well and can be read without having to reread and comprehend more of the page.

Tales from Silver Lands is a collection of nineteen folktales, which Finger collected during his travels in South America.

Nineteen myths and folk stories from Central and South America are illustrated with striking woodcuts.
Gogal
I'm reading this book to my six year old at the moment. He loves it. And so do I.

This book is a wonderful collection of Latin American folktales and myths ~ and just a fun read. One story for bedtime each night. Just perfect.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This 1925 Newbery Award winner is a collection of nineteen folk tales which the author, Charles J. Finger, collected while journeying through Central and South America. These tales come from such diverse places as Honduras, the Orinoco region of Venezuela, Guiana, Cape Horn, Brazil, the Andes, the southern Patagonia area of Argentina, Chile, the pampas of Paraguay, Uruguay, Colombia, and Bolivia. Some people will like them while others will not. They are fantastic and even bizarre stories that reflect the pre-Christian beliefs of Native South Americans, with magic, wizards, witches, casting spells, giants, and such things. However, in general, good is rewarded and evil is punished.

As is true of even Western "fairy tales," many believers object to reading about such things related to enchantment and thus would want to avoid books like this. Obviously, sensitive children who have problems with nightmares should stay away from it too. Others may not care for the archaic narrative style, finding it a little difficult to wade through. Admittedly, the book has an overall "dark" feel to it, but as one who has always liked learning about the folklore of different cultures, I somewhat enjoyed it. Each family will have to make its own decisions on these matters. There are some references to smoking tobacco and a few instances of death and warfare, but nothing that most people would feel is overtly inappropriate or objectionable. Those who are fascinated with mythological explanations for natural phenomena should find it interesting.
Alister
Tales from Silver Lands by Charles J. Finger won the John Newbery Award in 1925. I didn't know anything about the book when I picked it up other than it's Newbery, but I must say, I was quite pleasantly surprised by what I found.

I have always loved Fairy Tales. Like, a lot. If you remember, a few weeks ago I talked about my first experience reading Grimm's Fairy Tales, which helped cement my love for reading them as well. (If you are really interested, click here, and you can go back and read it.) So, imagine my delight when I realized this was a collection of 19 fairy tales recorded by Finger from South America. Although I'm not nearly as knowledgeable about other countries and their rich cultural histories as I'd like to be, I'm always open to learning more. And I think you can learn a lot about a society from their fairy tales and children's stories.

This was a real treat for me to read, and one I'm definitely looking forward to adding to my shelves and rereading, not only for myself but also to read to kids. I used to read some of the Grimm's fairy tales to my little brothers as a bedtime story, and I'd love to be able to add these tales to stories I can read/tell to young kids.

Although some of these stories might be classified as more mythology than fairy tale, I felt the same way reading these as I did reading the classic fairy tales. There's that sense of magic and possibility, where you know anything can happen, and although things might get a little rough along the way, and there probably won't be super happy ending, the good guys do win in the end.

I also noticed that the emphasis of each tale was placed on the struggles of each character rather than the resolution. The ending is always over so quickly. Normally, this is something that is a major no-no in writing, I mean, seriously. Who wants to read a 400 pg. build up to a 4 paragraph resolution?! But it seems to work in fairy tales. The stories aren't about what happens, it's about learning how to get there. We see their struggles, know their challenges and then we get to know they end up relatively alright in the end.

This is definitely a book I would recommend. The writing is a little older, but to anyone who is a fan of fairy tales in their original setting (or people who want to write a fairy tale retelling but are wanting new material) this is a great book to read and one that I strongly recommend.
HeonIc
i enjoy folk/fairytales in general, and this collection is esp. interesting as a comparison to the more well-known european ones (the magic dog is eerily similar to the famous french fairy tale donkeyskin). there are some great images and situations, and although more than a few sort of meander and fizzle out there were enough uniques ones to keep you reading to the end. not the best, but not the worst either.
SiIеnt
This children's book is a collection of nineteen folk tales collected and retold by the author from his travels throughout Central and South America. The book won the 1925 Newbery Medal for best contribution to American children's literature. I am oviously in the minority with my opinion: I only awarded the book two stars. I simply found it boring. But, this is obviously a good resource of South American folktales. Perhaps those who enjoy such material will like the book more than I.
Nilador
This is a wonderful collection of tales from South America, which won the Newbery Medal 1925. The stories are for all ages and written to intrigue the reader and whisk him or her to a far away land. Brave worriers, fair maidens, rich kings, evil witches, and ferocious giants are all a part of these tales. My only negative comment about this book is that towards the end it became somewhat repetitive. All the characters became somewhat similar and the plots (although diverse) had similar paths. However, this is a great book for children's bedtime stories, and a treat to the adult who reads it to them.
Original
I first got this book when I was in the 4th grade. Thats right, the 4th grade. It is an excellent compilation of above average stories. Ancient tales like the "Calabash Man" and "The Tale Of The Gentle Folk." These stories can be appreciated across the board by all ages. The fantastic wording creates vivid pictures in the mind, and slips a moral in while you're not looking. I struggle to describe my appreciation for this wonderful compilation of tales. It is still my favorite book, since the 4th grade, and I'm in college. So it just goes to prove my point.
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