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eBook Paul: An Introduction to His Thought ePub

by C. K. Barrett

eBook Paul: An Introduction to His Thought ePub
Author: C. K. Barrett
Language: English
ISBN: 0664255418
ISBN13: 978-0664255411
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Pr (August 1, 1994)
Pages: 180
Category: Bible Study & Reference
Subcategory: Christians
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 612
Formats: docx lrf lit mbr
ePub file: 1380 kb
Fb2 file: 1180 kb

Barrett, C. K. (Charles Kingsley), 1917-. Paul, the Apostle, Saint. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Barrett, C. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on December 23, 2011.

Books such as Colossians, Acts, 2 Thessalonians, Ephesians, and the Pastorals. He then gives a brief sketch of Pauline theology at the time of his writing (mid 1990s)

Barrett has given us a helpful and concise summary of many difficult Pauline themes. The book is what it says it is: an introduction. Barrett says Paul used the Abraham narrative as mere prooftexts against his opponents (30)

Barrett has given us a helpful and concise summary of many difficult Pauline themes. For those involved in the so-called New Perspectives on Paul controversies, whether pro or con, Barrett’s book will cover little that is new. It’s still worth reading, though. A few caveats: Barrett, while no liberal himself, approaches the text from a critical standpoint. Barrett says Paul used the Abraham narrative as mere prooftexts against his opponents (30). I maintain, by contrast, that the Abrahamic narrative is central to Paul’s worldview. Barrett also says Paul downplayed any messianic notions to the Hebrewness of Christos.

This book is the mature product of a great master. it sums up Barrett's work of the last fifty years. -Robert Jewett, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, and author of Paul the Apostle to America and Saint Paul at the Movies. Pages: 180 Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press Published: 1994 ISBN-10: 0664255418 ISBN-13: 9780664255411. Find at a Library Find at Google Books.

Basing his book on detailed exegesis of relevant passages and using the whole corpus of Pauline letters, Barrett provides a solid introduction to Paul. His book will be of interest to both those approaching Paul for the first time and to those already familiar with him and the enormous literature concerning him. Bookmark.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Paul: An Introduction to His Thought by .  . This volume takes the reader back to the early days of Christianity

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Paul: An Introduction to His Thought by . This volume takes the reader back to the early days of Christianity. The writings of St Paul comprise a large part of the New Testament and they lay the foundations on which much Christian thinking came to be built. This is a guide to the thinking of Paul and those influenced by him. Product Identifiers.

Print version: Barrett, . Charles Kingsley), 1917- Paul. Louisville, Ky. : Westminster/John Knox Press, 1994 (DLC) 94001153 (OCoLC)29794150. Related Subjects:(4). Paul, - the Apostle, Saint. Named Person: Paul, the Apostle Saint. Paul, l'apôtre saint. Paul, the Apostle Saint. Paul, - l'apôtre, saint. Paul - (saint ; - 0228?-0341?)

Items related to Paul: An Introduction to His Thought. Basing his book on detailed exegesis of relevant passages and using the whole corpus of Pauline letters, Barrett provides a solid introduction to Paul.

Items related to Paul: An Introduction to His Thought. C. Barrett Paul: An Introduction to His Thought. ISBN 13: 9780664255411. Paul: An Introduction to His Thought. About the Author: . Barrett is Emeritus Professor of Divinity, Durham University.

Paul: An Introduction to His Thought. ICC. London: T&T Clark.

This volume, written by one of the most preeminent experts on Paul, takes the reader back to the earliest days of Christianity - a time before even the Gospels were written. C.K. Barrett concentrates on Paul as a Christian thinker. He traces the development and content of his teaching in a clear and comprehensive way and demonstrates that Paul's thought evolved out of the controversies in which he was engaged. Basing his book on detailed exegesis of relevant passages and using the whole corpus of Pauline letters, Barrett provides a solid introduction to Paul. His book will be of interest to both those approaching Paul for the first time and to those already familiar with him and the enormous literature concerning him.
Voodoogore
British Methodist Theologian and Biblical Scholar C.K. Barrett was widely regarded as one of the most prominent Christian thinkers of the past century. He was known for his expertise in a variety of biblical fields, but most known for his work surrounding the life and theology of the Apostle Paul. Do not be fooled, this “introductory” work, coming in at a brief (though compact) 175 pp., is biblical, challenging, rich, succinct in its focus, and powerfully communicates the Gospel of the eternal God proclaimed forth in Jesus Christ.

Barrett, working in the Evangelical-Critical tradition, begins with an overview of Paul’s life and the matters of authorship regarding the 13 writings traditionally linked to the Apostle’s pen. Barrett is convinced of 7, and interacts efficiently with the other writings in question. He then moves on to the controversies surrounding the Apostle’s ministry, primarily focusing on the theological difficulties faced in the Christian letters of Galatians, Corinthians, Philippians and Romans. In a brief 30+ pp., Barrett summarizes that all the controversies can be tied together into an inadequate Christology, namely, issues regarding who Christ is and what this Savior has done. If this is the only reading done in this book, the Christian will be supremely edified and fortified in the power of the one true Gospel, the good news of free grace, gifted in the Son of God for His people. The clarity of Justification by grace alone is held out with incredible clarity and given defense in each controversy, all which tie back to whether the “good news” is human efforts to please God, ascend to God, and bargain with God, as taught incessantly by the so-called “Judaizers”, versus the Gospel of free grace found only in Jesus Christ, opposed to works, and where “human credits have been transformed into debits” because of the reality of knowing Jesus Christ (Phil. 3:7-14). Barrett holds up high a “theology of grace” and a “theology of the cross” as opposed to a “theology of human effort” and a “theology of (human) glory”. His writing here is like drinking the coldest drink of water in the barren wilderness and heat of life.

Barrett then turns his attention to the “theology of Apostle Paul”, and quickly discusses a number of very Pauline categories for the Christian faith, all of which are very edifying and challenging. He helps his audience reorient themselves to the true “emphasis” of Paul’s apocalyptic mode of thinking – that the ‘Christ event’ has brought in a new age, a new reign, and invaded the decaying world with the new reality of the true King who is forming a new humanity, a new people. This emphasis, while not Paul’s all-encompassing focus, serves as a corrective in most evangelical circles today, where there is little mention of a theology of the “end times” that’s focused on the person of Christ, instead of some end of the world event. The event is Christ. Other categories Barrett engages are further explanations of Paul’s free grace offer of the Gospel as opposed to the Judaizers that continue to plague the church in every corner (Gal. 5:1-5).

Barrett ends his compact and impactful introduction of the Apostle with an engagement of the other letters which might not have been from the Apostle’s pen, but have been credited to his theology and thought, therefore within the Pauline tradition. Books such as Colossians, Acts, 2 Thessalonians, Ephesians, and the Pastorals. He then gives a brief sketch of Pauline theology at the time of his writing (mid 1990s).

This book is a must read for every Christian interested in what our tradition has taught, especially concerning the final things, law and covenant, righteousness and grace, and the life of the Apostle Paul. It will serve as both a corrective and refocusing of each believer on the truth of the Gospel, the freeness given to each by grace, and the liberating power of the love of God in Jesus Christ preached forth and heralded by the greatest of all Christian apostles and theologians, Paul of Tarsus.
Manona
This is by far one of the best products that ive purchased on amazon in a long time!!! highly suggest it!!
Mr.Bean
CK. Barrett has given us a helpful and concise summary of many difficult Pauline themes. The book is what it says it is: an introduction. For those involved in the so-called New Perspectives on Paul controversies, whether pro or con, Barrett’s book will cover little that is new. It’s still worth reading, though.

A few caveats: Barrett, while no liberal himself, approaches the text from a critical standpoint. He is doubtful of Pauline authorship on the later epistles (Ephesians, Colossians, 2 Thess., and the Pastorals). He tries to find tensions between the Paul of the Epistles and the Lukan Paul. I disagree with his conclusions, but I would rather he ask them than Bart Ehrman.

For Barrett Paul’s starting point is “Christ alone” (44). From this he draws several corollaries, most notably justification. Christ + anything is something other than the gospel.

While denying that Paul is a systematician (56), he gives us a wonderfully Pauline take on anthropology, with good discussions on “mind” and “spirit” (65). He has a nice section on the forensic nature of justification (92).

Disagreements

Barrett says Paul used the Abraham narrative as mere prooftexts against his opponents (30). I maintain, by contrast, that the Abrahamic narrative is central to Paul’s worldview. Barrett also says Paul downplayed any messianic notions to the Hebrewness of “Christos.” Instead, so Barrett reasons, Paul used “Kurios.” Methinks he sees disagreements where there are none. Paul had no problem with Christos and he saw the seed of David as the Lord of the World.

Barrett denies Pauline authorship of the Pastorals (158), but then seemingly gives reasons against his view. If the post-apostolic world was as anti-Pauline as he says (and I have no idea whether that is true or not; I’ll pretend that it is), then why would a later Pauline disciple claim to be Paul, since such a view would actually militate against his position?

Conclusion

It is good at points, but too critical to give a hearty recommendation.
Voodoosida
This book is an essential guide to understanding the theology of St Paul. Barrett is a superbe theologian, author of excellent commentaries on (among others) Romans and 1 Corinthians. These commentaries stand the test of time, and are rightly still widely used. For those commentaries, the author produced his own translations of Paul's writings.

This book should be read in conjunction with Paul's works and other study aids. A consistent manner of understanding the apostle is presented, and his conclusions are well considered.

Also read this in conjunction with N T Wright's "What St Paul really Said". Whilst Wright's book is a polemic against a wrong headed interpretation of Paul, it is also another excellent primer in Pauline thought written in an accessible manner. Curiously Wright does not refer to Barrett explicitly, which is a loss in the second work as the reading of both books together will reveal both the strengths and the weaknesses of both arguments.
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