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eBook How to Read the Bible: History, Prophecy, Literature--Why Modern Readers Need to Know the Difference and What It Means for Faith Today ePub

by Steven L McKenzie

eBook How to Read the Bible: History, Prophecy, Literature--Why Modern Readers Need to Know the Difference and What It Means for Faith Today ePub
Author: Steven L McKenzie
Language: English
ISBN: 0195161491
ISBN13: 978-0195161496
Publisher: Oxford University Press (September 15, 2005)
Pages: 224
Category: Bible Study & Reference
Subcategory: Christians
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 272
Formats: mbr lit mobi doc
ePub file: 1471 kb
Fb2 file: 1570 kb

engineers have solid statistical know-how, yet engineers in industry typically are not well-prepared to . .and as literature As Steven McKenzie shows.

engineers have solid statistical know-how, yet engineers in industry typically are not well-prepared to .The author is a professor, not a preacher, and approaches the reading of the Bible. How to Read the Bible: History, Prophecy, Literature-Why Modern Readers Need to Know. 218 Pages·2005·788 KB·64 Downloads·New! to its words. The question is, do they understand what they're reading? As Steven McKenzie shows. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New!

Ancient history is a totally different genre from modern history

Why is ISBN important? ISBN. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. Ancient history is a totally different genre from modern history. He then goes on with a number of examples of stories in the Bible that are misinterpreted as actual fact when they are more representations of how the Israelites look at their history. McKenzie continues on in a similar manner, discussing the prophetic books and the apocalyptic books. First, he explains the misunderstanding between modern readers and the authors of the books.

More people read the Bible than any other book. McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp the intentions of the biblical authors themselves-what sort of texts they thought they were writing and how they would have been understood by their intended audience. Indeed, many try to live their lives according to its words. In short, we must recognize the genres to which these texts belong. McKenzie examines several genres that are typically misunderstood, offering careful readings of specific texts to show how the confusion arises, and how knowing the genre produces a correct reading.

More people read the Bible than any other book. H OW TO R E A D T H E B I B L E History, Prophecy, LiteratureWhy Modern Readers Need to Know the Difference, and What It Means for Faith Today

More people read the Bible than any other book. H OW TO R E A D T H E B I B L E History, Prophecy, LiteratureWhy Modern Readers Need to Know the Difference, and What It Means for Faith Today. STEVEN L. McK E N Z I E. 2005.

The book is extremely well written, and a great introduction to reading the Bible critically and as literature

The book is extremely well written, and a great introduction to reading the Bible critically and as literature. The author is a professor, not a preacher, and approaches the reading of the Bible in a contextual format. The basic types of Biblical writings are discussed, examined and examples are given. This approach is likely to turn off a reader who is looking for a religious rather than a critical scholarly text

McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp t.Then why does Jesus refer to Jonah in Matthew 16:4 directly? There doesn't seem to be any hidden message or meaning apart from being separated from God and the world

McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp t.Then why does Jesus refer to Jonah in Matthew 16:4 directly? There doesn't seem to be any hidden message or meaning apart from being separated from God and the world. Too many Christians writing 'get out' doctrine so we can understand the word of God. The fact is, Jesus affirmed the scriptures at true and from God when he walked the earth, including this piece. How are we supposed to understand everything God did? We are so easy to dismiss things the world can't believe and we try to apply our Then why does Jesus refer to Jonah in Matthew 16:4 directly?

McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp the . For anyone who takes reading the Bible seriously and who wants to get it right, this book will be both heartening and enlightening. by Steven L McKenzie.

McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp the intentions of the biblical authors themselves-what sort of texts they thought they were writing and how they would have been understood by their intended audience. Indeed, many try to live their lives according to its words

More people read the Bible than any other book. That is at least one good reason why it may be worthwhile to deflect attention from whatever efficient causality (influence) Durant's ideas may have exercised and focus it on their formal and final causes instead - on the questions what they were and where they led. What, then, were Durant's ideas? The treatise that he submitted to the council of Vienne in 1311 bristles with all sorts of complexities. But most of these are superficial.

You're here Christian Books Index How to Read the Bible: History . Availability: In Stock.

Bewildered by all of the genres that appear in Scripture--history, prophecy, proverb, apocalypse, letter, et. -McKenzie shows how to identify each,. Online family Christian book store. You're here Christian Books Index How to Read the Bible: History, Prophecy, Literature - Why Modern Readers Need to Know the Difference and What It Means for Faith Today.

McKenzie argues that to comprehend the Bible we must grasp the intentions of the biblical authors themselves--what sort of texts they thought they were writing and how they would have been understood by their intended audience. In short, we must recognize the genres to which these texts belong. McKenzie examines several genres that are typically misunderstood, offering careful readings of specific texts to show how the confusion arises, and how knowing the genre produces a correct reading. The book of Jonah, for example, offers many clues that it is meant as a humorous satire, not a straight-faced historical account of a man who was swallowed by a fish. Likewise, McKenzie explains that the very names "Adam" and "Eve" tell us that these are not historical characters, but figures who symbolize human origins ("Adam" means man , "Eve" is related to the word for life ). Similarly, the authors of apocalyptic texts--including the Book of Revelation--were writing allegories of events that were happening in their own time. Not for a moment could they imagine that centuries afterwards, readers would be poring over their works for clues to the date of the Second Coming of Christ, or when and how the world would end.For anyone who takes reading the Bible seriously and who wants to get it right, this book will be both heartening and enlightening.
Mariwyn
You have to understand what this book is. It is not a book written from a devotional point of view. It is a book written from a scholarly point of view. It is not a book trying to debunk religion, but it is a book that asks you to read what you are reading from the point of view of the original readers of the book, and to understand what the original intent of the individual books of the bible had in their own time.

I learned a lot from what I read. I already am of the opinion that people wrote the bible, so figuring out what those people were trying to say made sense to me. But on the other hand, as a believer, I was glad I wasn't also trying to deal with an author who was trying to convince me all faith was nonsense.

If you believe in the inerrancy of the bible, you won't be happy with this book. If you believe it was a book written by people over a 1000 year period, who had their own agenda, and who wanted to the people of their own time, you just might like what this author has to say.
Cherry The Countess
The book is extremely well written, and a great introduction to reading the Bible critically and as literature. The author is a professor, not a preacher, and approaches the reading of the Bible in a contextual format. The basic types of Biblical writings are discussed, examined and examples are given. McKenzie emphasizes the need to read the Bible within the cultural, historical and literary framework at the time of writing. This approach is likely to turn off a reader who is looking for a religious rather than a critical scholarly text. I strongly recommend the book if you are looking for an approachable and readable introduction to scholarly Bible study.
Glei
I found much in this book to help me communicate to my students how biblical criticism clarifies the purpose of individual elements of the Bible. It's not light reading; it's a scholarly and academic project. But recognizing genre and its impact on text is essential for any reading of the Bible, scholarly or faith-based--and I found McKenzie's approach respectful of both possibilities. He's not assuming verbal inerrancy (that every individual word is inspired and true), but he's also not assuming that the whole text is of only historical/literary worth either. His starting discussion of Jonah is a wonderful instance--recognizing the genre (both what biblical prophecy is and isn't; what satire does and doesn't do) helps clarify the message the text offered its original audience: it's a message of tolerance to a world full of those quick to judge and condemn differences. McKenzie offers specific references to the Hebrew words, textual structure, and archaelogy to provide clarity. Good stuff, clearly explained. Definitely worth reading if you're interested in understanding the Bible from a scholarly standpoint--regardless of where you want that standpoint to take you in faith terms.
Hellstaff
Real insight into the Old Testament.
The Sphinx of Driz
The book came in good shape and is a good addition to my library.
Llbery
This past summer I decided to read the Bible from cover to cover, all the way through. I've never done that before, but I hadn't expected it to be too difficult as a church-going Catholic. I figured that I had been getting most of the Bible along the way anyway by going to church. As I tackled the first five books of the Old Testament, I quickly found that I was mistaken. Genesis and Exodus were familiar with their popular stories, but I was quickly bogged down in Leviticus and Deuteronomy. That's when I started looking for a book that would give me more information ABOUT the Bible so that I would be better prepared to understand what I was reading and get something out of it. Steven L. McKenzie's book was exactly what I needed.

As a professor of the Hebrew Bible, he gives the reader a historian's scholarly perspective on the Bible, including both the Old and New Testaments. The main point of this book is that all books in the Bible need to be understood based on their genre. The other main emphasis of his book is the importance of understanding the context, historically, socially, and culturally, of the passages contained in the Bible. He starts by discussing the historical books in the Old Testament and explaining how the definition of history was different for ancient writers than it is today. Ancient history is a totally different genre from modern history. He then goes on with a number of examples of stories in the Bible that are misinterpreted as actual fact when they are more representations of how the Israelites look at their history.

McKenzie continues on in a similar manner, discussing the prophetic books and the apocalyptic books. First, he explains the misunderstanding between modern readers and the authors of the books. Then he goes on to show how prophetic books need to be taken in the social contexts they are from. Rather than trying to predict the future, they are immediately applicable to the situations from which they arose and were written. Once again, he takes many specific examples to give the reader a full understanding of the literature he is discussing.

Other topics covered include the Wisdom books and the Letters from the New Testament.

Something notable about this book is that it never undermines or criticizes either Judaism or Christianity. McKenzie explains the Bible from a scholars point of view, which may not agree with theology, but I thought that everything he wrote was respectful and thoughtful. This book is not in any way an attack on religion. It is simply a guide to help people from all walks of life understand the Bible as a literary work in its historical context. I am disappointed that some reviewers misinterpreted the object of this book.

If you are looking to learn more about the Bible and the meaning behind the books it contains, "How to Read the Bible" is a great place to start. It makes a world of a difference in the sometimes daunting task of reading the Bible.
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