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eBook Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit ePub

by Garry Wills

eBook Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit ePub
Author: Garry Wills
Language: English
ISBN: 0385494114
ISBN13: 978-0385494113
Publisher: Image; Reprint edition (September 18, 2001)
Pages: 336
Category: Christian Living
Subcategory: Christians
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 293
Formats: lit mbr rtf azw
ePub file: 1921 kb
Fb2 file: 1633 kb

5Papal Sin, Structures of Deceit by Gary Wills (Doubleday, June 2000). All further references to Wills’ book will give page number alone.

5Papal Sin, Structures of Deceit by Gary Wills (Doubleday, June 2000). 6Politics and Catholic Freedom by Gary Wills (Henry Regnery Company, 1964). 7America, August 12, 1961.

In his book, Wills alludes occasionally to the most egregious papal scoundrels: "In the tenth . It is time to free Catholics, lay as well as clerical, from the structures of deceit that are our subtle modern form of papal sin.

In his book, Wills alludes occasionally to the most egregious papal scoundrels: "In the tenth century a dissolute teenager could be elected Pope (John XII) because of his family connections and die a decade later in the bed of a married woman. But most of the author's energy is devoted to an incisive analysis of recent popes' doctrinal pronouncements, which Wills believes have eroded the Church's moral authority and contributed to the drastic decline in vocations to the priesthood today.

Look out for a new book from Garry Wills, What The Qur'an Meant, coming fall 2017. The truth, we are told, will make us free. Paler, subtler, less dramatic than the sins castigated by Orcagna or Dante, these are the quiet sins of intellectual betrayal.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The truth, we are told, will make us free. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit. The truth, we are told, will make us free

Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit. Look out for a new book from Garry Wills, What The Qur'an Meant, coming fall 2017. from the Introduction.

Wills' thesis in the "Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit" (Doubleday) is that "the life of church authorities is lived within structures . His main idea throughout the book is that every era of papal history has its own problematic issue.

Wills' thesis in the "Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit" (Doubleday) is that "the life of church authorities is lived within structures of deceit. In his book Wills puts his extensive knowledge of St. Augustine, and church traditions, to work in depicting the "structures of deceit" which he claims are built into the Roman Catholic papacy. His main idea throughout the book is that every era of papal history has its own problematic issue

Garry Wills, in his book Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit, argued that the imposition of celibacy among Catholic priests played a pivotal role in the cultivation of the Church as one of the most influential institutions in the world.

Garry Wills, in his book Papal Sin: Structures of Deceit, argued that the imposition of celibacy among Catholic priests played a pivotal role in the cultivation of the Church as one of the most influential institutions in the world.

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Look out for a new book from Garry Wills, What The Qur'an Meant, coming fall 2017. "The truth, we are told, will make us free.   It is time to free Catholics, lay as well as clerical, from the structures of deceit that are our subtle modern form of papal sin.  Paler, subtler, less dramatic than the sins castigated by Orcagna or Dante, these are the quiet sins of intellectual betrayal."--from the IntroductionFrom Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills comes an assured, acutely insightful--and occasionally stinging--critique of the Catholic Church and its hierarchy from the nineteenth century to the present.Papal Sin in the past was blatant, as Catholics themselves realized when they painted popes roasting in hell on their own church walls.  Surely, the great abuses of the past--the nepotism, murders, and wars of conquest--no longer prevail; yet, the sin of the modern papacy, as revealed by Garry Wills in his penetrating new book, is every bit as real, though less obvious than the old sins. Wills describes a papacy that seems steadfastly unwilling to face the truth about itself, its past, and its relations with others.  The refusal of the authorities of the Church to be honest about its teachings has needlessly exacerbated original mistakes.  Even when the Vatican has tried to tell the truth--e.g., about Catholics and the Holocaust--it has ended up resorting to historical distortions and evasions.  The same is true when the papacy has attempted to deal with its record of discrimination against women, or with its unbelievable assertion that "natural law" dictates its sexual code.Though the blithe disregard of some Catholics for papal directives has occasionally been attributed to mere hedonism or willfulness, it actually reflects a failure, after long trying on their part, to find a credible level of honesty in the official positions adopted by modern popes.  On many issues outside the realm of revealed doctrine, the papacy has made itself unbelievable even to the well-disposed laity. The resulting distrust is in fact a neglected reason for the shortage of priests.  Entirely aside from the public uproar over celibacy, potential clergy have proven unwilling to put themselves in a position that supports dishonest teachings.Wills traces the rise of the papacy's stubborn resistance to the truth, beginning with the challenges posed in the nineteenth century by science, democracy, scriptural scholarship, and rigorous history.  The legacy of that resistance, despite the brief flare of John XXIII's papacy and some good initiatives in the 1960s by the Second Vatican Council (later baffled), is still strong in the Vatican.Finally Wills reminds the reader of the positive potential of the Church by turning to some great truth tellers of the Catholic tradition--St. Augustine, John Henry Newman, John Acton, and John XXIII.  In them, Wills shows that the righteous path can still be taken, if only the Vatican will muster the courage to speak even embarrassing truths in the name of Truth itself.
Maximilianishe
Disclaimer: I am neither a practicing Catholic nor was I raised as a Catholic.

I noticed this book on the bargain table at a local book store, read the jacket and the table of contents and I was intrigued. The book is divided into four sections: Historical Dishonesties; Doctrinal Dishonesties; The Honesty Issue; and The Splendor Of Truth. I recommend using the "search inside this book" option to review the table of contents and the first chapter.

I found this book a challenge. I read a chapter or two and then did not pick up the book for weeks. At times reading Papal Sin was laborious, yet like physical exercise the mental exercise was beneficial. Of particular interest were the chapters on women (Excluded Women), celibacy of priests (The Pope's Eunuch's and Priestly Caste), priests as sex offenders (Conspiracy of Silence), homosexuality (A Gay Priesthood) and contraception (The Gift of Life).

To a non-Catholic, Papal Sin is educational and fascinating. To a devote Catholic who believes in the infallibility of the Pope, this book is likely blasphemous.

Four plus stars.
Zieryn
Papal Sin hits the mark...mostly. It makes the convincing case that far too often (and for most of the history of the Church), popes and the church authority have been all too willing to look away from the truth, simply for the benefit of power (personal and structural), "reputation" protection, and advancement of personal individual agendas (even those that are well intentioned). He makes clear what so many of us have already concluded, that much of the "new teachings" of the church (lower case to denote the human elements within the Church) were Rube-Goldberg-like in their development and defense. Many of these "teachings" ultimately crumble when the earnest faithful see them for what they are -- errors in logic or judgment, or just plain excuses to cover for past errors in logic or judgment. The ends justify the means way too often, and its obvious for anyone willing to investigate the incidents and think critically about what we are being told. This is an uncomfortable book to read if you were raised in a Catholic family, attending Catholic schools, and are still deeply committed to the Church, scriptures and the deposit of faith as "originally" defined (not so easy to pin down actually).
Having hit the nail, so to speak, Wills does go too far at times. I certainly don't agree with everything or every position he takes. It seems he holds that if scripture does not overtly proscribe something, it should be fair game, or at least open for debate. This puts grease on the already-slippery-slope of moral relativism. He says that abortion is not murder while conceding that it is a human life from the moment of conception. It's not murder because the human life is not yet a person. Huh? I don't care how much psychobabble you can cite, that kind of reasoning is scary. So, there are parts of this book that go way too far IMO. Wills becomes an excessive gay-lifestyle apologist, which eventually becomes unrelated to the topic of the book.
Though I see much wrong with this book, there is a lot that is right, and I thank Mr. Wills for the courage to say what so many of us sensed for quite a long time. The human elements of the Church heirarchy have created a monumental credibility crisis that will likely take decades to resolve. The first steps require recognition of the problem. I'm not at all convinced the Vatican has a clue.
Mora
When I was newly out of college, my church's minister approached me and asked me to teach the adult class in Sunday School. (This was a Community Church, roughly Episcopalian in its creed.) I said, "Why? You know I'm an atheist." "Because," he said, "they need a Devil's Advocate. I know you respect religion even though you don't believe. But their faith is lazy. They need it challenged. They need to toughen it up. Christians need the challenge of someone who disagrees with them." I'm still an unbeliever but teaching Sunday School that year was one of the most rewarding things I've ever done.

Gary Wills isn't a Devil's Advocate for Roman Catholics but he's something close to that, a devout believer who still finds the Church, and especially its ruling hierarchy, imperfect reflections of God's will. He is als
o arguably the most prominent Catholic lay intellectual writing at present. (His only competitor seems to be Karen Armstrong.)

Even when the Church has disappointed him, Wills has not let his faith lapse. His credentials are substantial: a Ph. D. in history, and education and teaching in the classics, and a number of substantial books on American history (on the Gettysburg Address, Henry Adams's history of the United States, Nixon's presidency) and religion (Why I Am a Catholic, What Jesus Means, What Paul Means, a short biography of Augustine) and translations from the Latin (Augustine's Confessions, Martial's epigrams).

Like him or not, he's not a lightweight. He's a serious thinker and believer and thus he deserves attention whenever he writes.

Having said that, to orthodox conservative Catholics, Papal Sin must seem like a landmine laid down on the road to obedience, so many flaws --fatal flaws, in my judgment-- does he lay bare in the Roman Catholic Church's hierarchy and decisionmaking process.

This is a book about how past popes made fatal mistakes and current popes and the Vatican have compounded them with subsequent bad judgments. This is the Church that now can't find enough acolytes to populate the seminaries. In interviews, an astonishingly high percentage of priests confess to masturbating, having sex with parishioners or others, homosexual encounters, even pedophilia, and still the Church won't tolerate allowing priests to marry or women or gays to be ordained. The hierarchy has repeatedly found excuses for predatory priests who have abused children in their power, reassiging them to new parishes after flimsy and ineffective therapy, and blaming the victims for the priests' pedophilia as though the young children who have been abused had been the predators, enticing their priests to forbidden sexual acts.

The church bans contraception but survey after survey shows that the majority of its practitioners ignore church teachings on the subject., It condemns abortion even in cases of rape and incest and, against the writings of many church fathers , including Aquinas, claims a foetus is a full human being from the moment of fertilization. A pope finally, reluctantly, acknowledges that the Holocaust shouldn't have happened but denies the Church's past history of anti-semitism, as though complicity in the Holocaust falls totally elsewhere.

Wills argues with a wealth of historical and textual evidence that the fault lies in the persistent misreading of Biblical texts to support anti-modern goals. Equally harmfully, the Vatican persists in insisting that past judgments by Popes must all still be right, even when the majority of today's bishops recommend change. Structures of power undermine honesty.

The church that Wills advocates is more like a church composed of St. Francises, or at least of people who strive to emulate St. Francis. The Holy Spirit envelops us all, with no need to exalt the Virgin Mary in its place. (There is an interesting chapter on the nineteenth and twentieth-century exaltation of the Virgin Mary at the expense of the Holy Spirit, whose provenance is of much longer standing.) in Wills's church, Christians admit their imperfections but are saved by Christ's actions. The Church hierarchy is equally humble and it depends on the community of the faithful for its legitimacy, not rules over the faithful imperiously.
Onnell
This book is NOT an indictment of Catholicism. It does expose the deceit within the structures of the church which are not unlike corporate America
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