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eBook The ThoughtWorks Anthology: Essays on Software Technology and Innovation (Pragmatic Programmers) ePub

by ThoughtWorks Inc.

eBook The ThoughtWorks Anthology: Essays on Software Technology and Innovation (Pragmatic Programmers) ePub
Author: ThoughtWorks Inc.
Language: English
ISBN: 193435614X
ISBN13: 978-1934356142
Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf; 1 edition (March 27, 2008)
Pages: 248
Category: Programming
Subcategory: Computers
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 799
Formats: lrf azw rtf docx
ePub file: 1308 kb
Fb2 file: 1585 kb

ThoughtWorks is a well-known global consulting firm; ThoughtWorkers are leaders in areas of design, architecture, SO.

ThoughtWorks is a well-known global consulting firm; ThoughtWorkers are leaders in areas of design, architecture, SO. This is a terrific book loaded up with 13 short, concise, golden essays from ThoughtWorks leaders like Martin Fowler, Neal Ford, etc. Each topic covers something pretty vital for those of us who care about being somewhere near the top of our chosen craft. Each article is extremely well-written and useful, but I found a subset of the book particularly compelling.

The ThoughtWorks Anthology gives burgeoning authors a voice, and gives the outside world a glimpse of the water cooler conversation a. .

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. The ThoughtWorks Anthology gives burgeoning authors a voice, and gives the outside world a glimpse of the water cooler conversation at ThoughtWorks. Paperback: 248 pages.

The ThoughtWorks Anthology. Essays on Software Technology and Innovation. Roy Singham Martin Fowler Rebecca Parsons Neal Ford Jeff Bay Michael Robinson Tiffany Lentz Stelios Pantazopoulos Ian Robinson Erik Doernenburg Julian Simpson Dave Farley Kristan Vingrys James Bull. The Pragmatic Bookshelf.

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Download The ThoughtWorks Anthology or any other file from Books category. ThoughtWorks is a well-known global consulting firm; ThoughtWorkers are leaders in areas of design, architecture, SOA, testing, and agile methodologies. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/The ThoughtWorks Anthology. Tagged: ThoughtWorks.

While ThoughtWorks is perhaps best known for their work in the Agile community, this anthology confronts issues throughout the software development life cycle. From technology issues that transcend methodology, to issues of realizing business value from applications, you’ll find it here. About the AuthorThoughtWorks is a well-known global consulting firm; ThoughtWorkers are leaders in areas of design, architecture, SOA, testing, and agile methodologies. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

an int on its own is just a scalar, so it has no meaning. When a method takes an int as a parameter, the method name needs to do all of the work of expressing the intent. If the same method takes an Hour as a parameter, it’s much easier to see what’s going on. Small objects like this can make programs more maintainable, since it isn’t possible to pass a Year to a method that takes an Hour parameter. With a primitive variable the compiler can’t help you write semantically correct programs

ThoughtWorks Inc. When you hit a rough spot in software development, it's nice to know that someone has been .

ThoughtWorks Inc. When you hit a rough spot in software development, it's nice to know that someone has been there before. This new collection of essays from the experts at ThoughtWorks offers practical insight and advice on a range of challenges faced daily by software developers and IT professionals.

Items related to The ThoughtWorks Anthology: Essays on Software Technology. ThoughtWorks Inc. The ThoughtWorks Anthology: Essays on Software Technology and Innovation (Pragmatic Programmers). ISBN 13: 9781934356142. This collection of essays brings together contributions from well-known ThoughtWorkers such as Martin Fowler, along with other authors you may not know yet.

The Thoughtworks Anthology book. Fred rated it it was amazing Dec 31, 2016. Yogesh Anand rated it really liked it Aug 02, 2014. Kiran Babu rated it liked it Mar 07, 2018. David Grant rated it really liked it Oct 11, 2013. John s rated it liked it Feb 18, 2015.

ThoughtWorks is a well-known global consulting firm; ThoughtWorkers are leaders in areas of design, architecture, SOA, testing, and agile methodologies. This collection of essays brings together contributions from well-known ThoughtWorkers such as Martin Fowler, along with other authors you may not know yet. While ThoughtWorks is perhaps best known for their work in the Agile community, this anthology confronts issues throughout the software development life cycle. From technology issues that transcend methodology, to issues of realizing business value from applications, you'll find it here.

Usishele
I feel that every techie should take a step back once in a while and reflect on their profession. The ThoughtWorks Anthology: Essays on Software Technology and Innovation by ThoughtWorks, Inc. is one of those books that helps lead you down that path. While there are some good reads in here, the "level of resonance" will likely depend on your language of choice and development methodology...

Contents:
Solving the Business Software "Last Mile" by Rog Singham and Michael Robinson
One Lair and Twenty Ruby DSLs by Martin Fowler
The Lush Landscape of Languages by Rebecca J. Parsons
Polyglot Programming by Neal Ford
Object Calistentics by Jeff Bay
What Is an Iteration Manager Anyway? by Tiffany Lentz
Project Vital Signs by Stelios Pantazopoulos
Consumer-Driven Contracts: A Service Evolution Pattern by Ian Robinson
Domain Annotations by Erik Doernenburg
Refactoring Ant Build Files by Julian Simpson
Single-Click Software Release by Dave Farley
Agile vs. Waterfall Testing for Enterprise Web Apps by Kristan Vingrys
Pragmatic Performance Testing by James Bull

Based on the type of work that ThoughtWorks does and their development methodology, you'll understand and relate a lot more to the material if you're into things like agile development, Ruby, Ant, and other various open source software offerings. Granted, the argument could be made that *everyone* should be using those things, but the reality is that there are plenty of developers who don't or can't for various reasons. But once you get past that point, there's plenty of material here that should get you to think a bit... Lush Languages does a great job in turning the Java vs Ruby argument into one where you're considering multiple language options based on the problem domain. Polyglot Programming is also very insightful, as it addresses the use of multiple languages within a single project so that you can get the best of all possible worlds. If they are all running under the same JVM, there's few reasons not to take advantage of the various strengths. I also enjoyed the Object Calisthenics entry, as the exercises force you to rethink program design without resorting to techniques that can get out of control very quickly. Many of the other chapters are a bit more focused on topics that might or might not work for you if you're not already using that software/approach. You can always dig out one or two items that are not specific to the tool (as in development tool programming should fall under the same level of control and planning as production code), but you have to work a bit harder to get there.

If you're into the particular tools outlined here, by all means get the book and read it. If you're not at that spot for whatever reason, it's still worth reading. Just be prepared to work a little harder and/or realize that some of the chapters just won't do much for you.
Small Black
This is a terrific book loaded up with 13 short, concise, golden essays from ThoughtWorks leaders like Martin Fowler, Neal Ford, etc. Each topic covers something pretty vital for those of us who care about being somewhere near the top of our chosen craft. Topics include solving the "last mile" problem between development and release, Ruby DSLs, polyglot programming, single-click deployment, and a bunch of other great reads. Each article is extremely well-written and useful, but I found a subset of the book particularly compelling.

Unfortunately, I only heard parts of Neal Ford's "Polyglot Programming" at his keynote at CodeMash 2008. I was thrilled to get to read his article in this book on how to leverage different languages on the same platform to solve different problems.

Jeff Bay's piece "Object Calisthenics" strongly reminded me of the glorious work The Practice of Programming from Kernigan and Pike in its emphasis on clean, simple, clear code. I'm all fired up to refresh my coding practices with Bay's exercise using nine points for pushing yourself into writing better object oriented code.

"Refactoring Ant Build Files" from Julian Simpson, along with Hatcher's Java Development with Ant, should be mandatory reading for anyone dealing with build files -- regardless of what build environment you're using.

Other big winners for me were the testing articles by Kristan Vingrys and James Bull, Dave Farley's work on one-click release, and Stelios Pantazopoulos's article on project vital signs. Of course, the remaining articles are also winners, it's just that these six or so really struck home with me.

Overall it's a fantastic work and I'm really glad I've got it on my bookshelf!
Mojar
One nice thing about collections of short pieces is that you can work your way through them in any order and only read ones that look interesting without worrying about missing crucial information. That's how I read this book, and I enjoyed most of the selections I read. I thought that the one on OO coding was great as it had good concrete exercises to help folks go down that road.

Recommended.
Samutilar
This book is packed with realworld knowledge and experience, written by people who have more than earned their title of expert. It covers many aspects of the software development world and adresses issues that you have most likely run into at some point, or are about to run into. Being able read how the experts deal with these things is very interesting indeed, it can either give you new ideas to better handle the issues, or it can be a confidence boost to see that the experts do things the same way as you.

For me, the part about the Iteration Manager and the performance testing were particularly interesting because I've had quite a few problems with this in the past.

Keep it up Thoughtworks!
Reddefender
The book didn't fulfill my expectations. I was expecting either:
* Practical advice (e.g. Joel on Software)
* Design ideas (e.g. Beautiful code)
* or even personal and/or professional experience (e.g. Masterminds of programming, or the oral history of CS)

I was not able to recognize them. The only thing that is common to all the chapters is the advocacy and wording of Agile development. However, I didn't understood from the introduction, chapter titles, and previous reviews, that this was the aim of the book.

I do not recommend it.
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