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eBook Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams ePub

by Mickey W. Mantle

eBook Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams ePub
Author: Mickey W. Mantle
Language: English
ISBN: 032182203X
ISBN13: 978-0321822031
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (September 26, 2012)
Pages: 464
Category: Programming
Subcategory: Computers
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 278
Formats: txt lrf lrf rtf
ePub file: 1184 kb
Fb2 file: 1183 kb

Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams. Mickey Mantle and Ron Lichty, two software industry veterans with over 70 years of combined experience, have crafted a book that will help any software manager be more successful.

Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams. by Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty. Addison Wesley, publishers Paperback: 450 pages. Having spent their careers developing software, leading software development projects, and managing programmers and teams, they have now distilled their experience into a book that every beginning programming manager should read and have on their bookshelves for reference.

Managing the Unmanageable is a great collection of sometimes-obvious and s guidance for software managers. I wish that I had had this book when I first started managing teams, and it still is illuminating

Managing the Unmanageable is a great collection of sometimes-obvious and s guidance for software managers. I wish that I had had this book when I first started managing teams, and it still is illuminating. For programmers who step into management, the hardest thing is to learn the soft skills. Unique dialogue around the human aspects of software development that is very much overdue.

Managing the Unmanageable book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Managing the Unmanageable book. Mantle and Lichty have assembled a guide that will help. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mickey W. Mantle has been developing software for over 40 years, creating hardware and software products and managing development teams. He thereafter joined 3-D computer graphics pioneer Evans & Sutherland (E&S) where he coauthored the original 3-D graphics library that paved the way for Silicon Graphics’s GL, which has since become OpenGL. At E&S he was a contributor to many notable computer graphics products and first started managing programmers and programming teams. to .

Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Give a Bookmate subscription →. About Bookmate.

In Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams, Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty answer that persistent question with a simple observation: You first must make programmers and software teams manageable. At Pixar, Mickey managed the development of all of the software for their external products, including the Pixar Image Computer, the Pixar Medical Imaging System, and RenderMan. He retired from Gracenote in early 2011 to finish this book, develop mobile/tablet applications, and consult with a variety of companies and organizations regarding the management of software people and teams.

Managing the Unmanageable: An Interview with Mickey Mantle and Ron Lichty on. .Tools 346. Chapter 9: Managing Successful Software Delivery 347. Defining the Project 348. Planning the Work 358.

Managing the Unmanageable: An Interview with Mickey Mantle and Ron Lichty on Managing Programmers. net and ww. onlichty.

Software and other digital artifacts are amongst the most valuable contributions of computer science. Yet our conferences treat these mostly as second-class conferences in the software sciences, which ought to know better. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Some organizations conclude that software development can’t be managed well. But it can - and it starts with people

Some organizations conclude that software development can’t be managed well. But it can - and it starts with people. Категория: КНИГИ ПРОГРАММИРОВАНИЕ.

“Mantle and Lichty have assembled a guide that will help you hire, motivate, and mentor a software development team that functions at the highest level. Their rules of thumb and coaching advice are great blueprints for new and experienced software engineering managers alike.”

—Tom Conrad, CTO, Pandora

“I wish I’d had this material available years ago. I see lots and lots of ‘meat’ in here that I’ll use over and over again as I try to become a better manager. The writing style is right on, and I love the personal anecdotes.”

—Steve Johnson, VP, Custom Solutions, DigitalFish

All too often, software development is deemed unmanageable. The news is filled with stories of projects that have run catastrophically over schedule and budget. Although adding some formal discipline to the development process has improved the situation, it has by no means solved the problem. How can it be, with so much time and money spent to get software development under control, that it remains so unmanageable?

In Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams , Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty answer that persistent question with a simple observation: You first must make programmers and software teams manageable. That is, you need to begin by understanding your people—how to hire them, motivate them, and lead them to develop and deliver great products. Drawing on their combined seventy years of software development and management experience, and highlighting the insights and wisdom of other successful managers, Mantle and Lichty provide the guidance you need to manage people and teams in order to deliver software successfully.

Whether you are new to software management, or have already been working in that role, you will appreciate the real-world knowledge and practical tools packed into this guide.

Bine
When I was laid off, I found myself unsure of what to do next with my career. I'd been promoted from being a software engineer to being a software manager. And even though I had managed the team for four years, I didn't feel like I was a real manager. I had no formal training whatsoever. It seemed to me that I'd only been able to manage because of my prior intimate familiarity with the team and project. And I wouldn't have that elsewhere. So how could I actually be hired as a manager at another company?

One of the things I learned from this book was that my situation is hardly unique. In fact, it's typical. The book speaks to people in my position as its expected audience. And it went on to teach me all about managing a software team effectively, filling in all of the voids I had felt for my lack of formal training on the subject.

It quickly became the center of my efforts to study and train for my next management position. Besides providing a wealth of information itself, it also points the reader to other books and resources for more information about subjects that are beyond its scope. It's very focused on the aspects that make managing a software team unique.

And I can't emphasize enough how much I wish I'd read this book as soon as I had been promoted. Or even before. I'd highly recommend this book to any software engineer who has, like myself, been promoted into management. And I would also recommend it to managers from other disciplines that have found themselves managing a software team. In short, this is a must read for anyone managing software developers.
Black_Hawk_Down.
Software developers really are a different breed. At best, they can be unruly to manage, and at worst they'll go and do something entirely different from what management really needs to have them do. Ron and Mickey bring many years of successful project AND people management skills and experience to this book (full disclosure -- I have worked separately with both Ron and Mickey on projects in past years). But both have built their skills the hard way, through many failures and hard experiences. It's only when you've been through the fire that you can write a book this practical and readable. For those wanting a theoretical tome about management, look elsewhere. For those who want very practical hands-on advice about management software people and projects, this is a great place to start.

And practical advice abounds in this book. I come from a software engineering background and have typically worked in startups so small that we don't have an HR person. So the guidance in Chapter 4 about how to setup a new engineer's first day was incredibly useful, especially as I read it just before we had someone new start. It allowed me to have the smoothest first day ever on-boarding a new employee.

But beyond that, most really great software development managers I know came up from the technology side, not HR, and so this book provides lots of great advice to learn how to handle the people management part of software development. Well worth the read!
Jeyn
I'm a director of engineering, and I've read a slew of management books. This is by far the best such book to cross my desk in ages. Mickey Mantle and Ron Lichty step through the entire lifecycle of managing engineers in clear, deliberate fashion. I appreciate that much of their advice is specific and proscriptive, and they include examples of the documents they use for e.g. performance reviews (with downloadable versions). I tell all my peers to buy this book and consult it regularly - and everyone who's read it agrees.
Umrdana
Finally a book about managing developers BY developers. I am head of engineering at a start up (and a developer myself) and really needed a read that would reflect my experiences as a developer AND as a manager. I will be getting this book for our library for all new managers at our company to reference. It is so great.
Akisame
This is one the must-have books for anyone in the management of software development and delivery business. It's a collective wisdom of 60+ years experience of Mike and Ron. Especially the Rules of Thumb and Nuggets of Wisdom section is awesome and I wish I had those 300 nuggets 10 years ago.

It’s one of the master pieces for managing software development and took its place near by The Mythical Man-Month in my digital library.

Ron and Mickey also have very comprehensive blogs and videos in YouTube where he shares their experience with ACM folks.

Thanks for all the great wisdom and knowledge you and Mickey shared with the book, your blogs and videos. I’m truly grateful to you both.
Uanabimo
I read this book and leant a ton. I've read many good books on engineering leadership or management in general, yet this is the best book I ever read about engineering leadership. It provided great insights and solutions to many common pain points engineering leaders face today. It's very practical and inspiring at the same time. I wish I read the book years ago.
Gold as Heart
If you lead an organization that has anything to do with software development, especially if you aren't a programmer yourself, grab this book. Reading it is like sneaking a mini-cam into their world... who are these people, what do they care about, what they need to stay breathing and coding, how to help them have influence with each other and across the organization. I've worked around software engineers for more than a decade, and I'm married to one... and I learned a lot reading this book.
I've seen no other book that really dives into the same topics, and fortunately this is a great one.
A must read if you are in a team leadership role tackling complex problems and driving innovation. Managing the Unmanageable is accessibly written with balanced breadth and depth. A very insightful section of delineating programmer types to help understand unique characteristics within our project teams. The book is packed with well organized insider knowledge of the software development management industry. Thank you Lichty and Mantle for taking good notes and sharing your findings with us in such a valuable resource.
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