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eBook Dayworld ePub

by Philip José Farmer,Tim White

eBook Dayworld ePub
Author: Philip José Farmer,Tim White
Language: English
ISBN: 0586066314
ISBN13: 978-0586066317
Publisher: Grafton Publications; New Ed edition (1986)
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 261
Formats: lrf txt doc lrf
ePub file: 1296 kb
Fb2 file: 1105 kb

From Philip Jose Farmer, award-winning author of the bestselling Riverworld novels, comes Dayworld, the first book in a completely new series even more dazzling and innovative

From Philip Jose Farmer, award-winning author of the bestselling Riverworld novels, comes Dayworld, the first book in a completely new series even more dazzling and innovative. Centuries from now, man has come up with a strikingly simple answer to overpopulation: A person is given one day a week to live, work and play. For the other six days, he is stoned -placed in suspended animation until his day rolls around again. In effect, his body lives for seven times a lifetime in a world that has seven different realities.

Philip José Farmer is one of the great names in science fiction world-wide. Tor books by Philip José Farmer. There’s no such thing as a bad Farmer novel, says Science Fiction Chronicle. The Dayworld series (Dayworld, Dayworld Rebel) followed his best-selling success with the classic Riverworld saga.

Philip Jose Farmer wrote the first short story of this concept in 1972. But consider only the first Dayworld novel; even a Farmer fan is going to find the other books in the series hard to digest. One person found this helpful. I'm surmising that he had to shelve the concept to pursue his popular and award winning Riverworld series (which is highly recommended). After he wrapped up that series in the early 80's, he could then pursue the Dayworld series after a 13 year hiatus.

Dayworld Rebel (The Dayworld Trilogy Book 2). Philip José Farmer. In 2001, Farmer won the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and was named Grand Master by the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America. Dayworld Breakup (The Dayworld Trilogy Book 3). The World of Tiers Volume Two: Behind the Walls of Terra, The Lavalite World, Red Orc's Rage, and More Than Fire.

Author Philip Jose Farmer. Books by Philip Jose Farmer: The Purple book. 10 7. 9, 10. Dayworld Breakup. Dayworld Rebel. Time's Last Gift. 10. The Dark Design.

Philip Jose Farmer was a prolific American novelist well known for writing fantasy and science fiction books and short stories

Philip Jose Farmer was a prolific American novelist well known for writing fantasy and science fiction books and short stories. He had written several mind-blowing book series in his career and is best remembered for the Riverworld and World of Tiers series. Farmer is regarded as one of the pioneers of using religious and sexual themes in his stories. Some of his popular works include the book series WOld Newton, Dayworld, World of Tiers, Secrets of the Nine, Riverworld, etc. Farmer was brought up in Peoria, where he studied at the Peoria High School. When he was small, he used to be a voracious reader. He found his interest in writing as early as in the 4th grade.

Dayworld is a trilogy of science fiction novels by Philip José Farmer, inspired by his own acclaimed short story "The Sliced-Crosswise Only-On-Tuesday World". They are set in a dystopian future in which people are allowed to live only one day of the week. For the rest of the six days they are "stoned," a kind of suspended animation. The novels focus on a man, Jeff Caird, who is a daybreaker: someone who lives more than one day a week.

Dayworld leads a sf trilogy by Philip José Farmer set in a dystopian future in which an overpopulated world allocates people only one day a week. The other six days they're in suspended animation. The focus is on Jeff Caird, a daybreaker living more than a day a week. He's not like most daybreakers. He belongs to the radical Immer group working to create a better Dayworld leads a sf trilogy by Philip José Farmer set in a dystopian future in which an overpopulated world allocates people only one day a week.

In the thirty-fifth century, when individuals are frozen for six days and allowed to live for one day a week, "day-breakers" like Jeff Caird, illegally steal entire weeks by juggling daily identities
Hi_Jacker
Part 1 of a trilogy of books. I'm a big fan of the Riverworld series so I think I was more predisposed to enjoy this series than I would have been picking it up cold. The concept of the day world is interesting and Farmer lends enough details to some of the logistics involved in creating a 'believable' day world scenario. The story itself starts of well enough but eventually feels rushed with a conclusion that really isn't satisfactory for a single book. I have both of the remaining volumes but this story left me without an urgent need to start on them. I think this is primarily due to lack of caring much, if any, about the main character.
Blackseeker
I acquired the sequel a few years ago but held off on reading it until I bought this one again. I remember DayWorld being a great read and a really interesting novel approach to an equally interesting concept. Too bad the third and final novel in the series is considered a dud by all Amazon reviewers; ...probably won't get that one.
Gtonydne
I started reading it as a high school kid and I think I was too prudish for the sexy stuff it starts with. I'm not too prudish now, but found completing it to be a total slog. Without revealing too much, as the week depicted goes on, the personalities become flimsier and flimsier, and the level of detail of each society he depicts gets thinner and thinner. It's as if Farmer got really tired of his conceit. He must have gotten bored and had to hit a deadline, and it shows.

Worth a read? Probably. I'd love to see it as a movie or even a TV series if well-executed. (Hello HBO?)
Cerekelv
PJF is one of my favorite SF authors. This is my first Dayworld book. I might look for the second at some point but not as eagerly as I did with the Riverworld series.
Vetitc
Philip Jose Farmer wrote the first short story of this concept in 1972. I'm surmising that he had to shelve the concept to pursue his popular and award winning Riverworld series (which is highly recommended). After he wrapped up that series in the early 80's, he could then pursue the Dayworld series after a 13 year hiatus. However, in the science fiction world, writing about overpopulation became passe. No, it wasn't because the threat of overpopulation was over, it was because Liberals in the 70's who bitterly opposed it, discovered that non-liberals and even Republicans were also concerned about overpopulation. If that was the case then there had to be something wrong with being concerned about it. Sure enough, the doctrine is not to complain about overpopulation, not because in places like Europe the population growth is at zero or even decreasing. It's in 3rd world countries where the greatest population growth is occurring and complaining about overpopulation is considered interfering with their internal affairs. The fact that overpopulation hasn't really changed much since the 70's doesn't matter. So with Farmer writing about overpopulation in the 80's was certainly not going to claim him any recognition let alone any awards. And it's a cycle, as interest in an author's book decreases, the authors own interest decreases. That can certainly be seen in this series, as the quality plummets through the three books.

The concept is certainly interesting. Due to supposed overpopulation, the `government' puts into suspended hibernation (or `stones' as in called in the story (haha what a great 70's term man) everyone and unstones them one day out of the week. So only one-seventh of the population is active on any given day. This leads to seven different societies, each with it's own fads and fashions. Our protagonist becomes a `daybreaker' that is, he lives every day of the week. This leads him to the necessity of leading seven different lives. Why does he do so, well, this is kind of the point of the story, and is it's weakest aspect. Farmer has a great concept here, but your imagination of what this type of world is like, if you're a science fiction reader, will be more interesting than the story-line itself. This basically means that reading this book, let alone the series is unnecessary. This is no knock on Farmer, who is a great and interesting writer. However, if you loved the Riverworld series and just have to read more by Farmer, I guess this is the place. But consider only the first Dayworld novel; even a Farmer fan is going to find the other books in the series hard to digest.
Bort
I’m not wild about contemporary dystopian novels, but lately I started to appreciate this sub-genre of science fiction when it comes to books of a few decades ago, destined to become classics. The inevitable anachronism of certain elements of the plot gives “Dayworld” by Farmer a special charm and originality that I can hardly see in the most recent stories.
Specifically, one of the topics of this novel is suspended animation, which is described from a different angle than the usual one for which this technology is assumed to be used in the future: to deal with overpopulation. Since there are too many people in the world, it is decided to let them live only one day a week, reducing to one-seventh the number of active individuals on the planet. This crazy idea is the basis of the story of Jeff Caird, a “daybreaker”, i.e. a person who, instead of living one day per week, lives them all, by taking seven different identities. And here immediately a second brilliant element comes up: Caird changes his name, life, but also personality every day. Each of its seven versions is a distinct character, which is also obvious to the reader, and it’s even hard to him to “connect” with his other versions.
As if that was not enough to have a main character who lives on the brink of madness because of the presence of seven personalities in his head, Caird (and the others) is a rebel of the Dayworld system and he ends up rebelling against those who want to overthrow the system, too. And for this reason he risks to be killed, revealing that neither side is really “good”.
The structure of the book, in which the many facets of the protagonist are shown to you one after another, is a perfect mechanism, which still manages to engage the reader, despite the constant changes in point of view.
In addition, although more than thirty years have passed after the original publication of this novel, it holds well the passage of time. Anachronisms are not excessive and sometimes could also be seen as a natural regression.
There are amazing and exciting action scenes, totally unpredictable developments including the ending, which it is impossible to predict.
Overall it’s a really good book, the first in a trilogy that promises to be very enjoyable.

Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli, author of Red Desert - Point of No Return
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