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eBook The Gap in the Curtain ePub

by John Buchan

eBook The Gap in the Curtain ePub
Author: John Buchan
Language: English
ISBN: 1447403266
ISBN13: 978-1447403265
Publisher: Sullivan Press (August 12, 2014)
Pages: 318
Category: Science Fiction
Subcategory: Fantasy
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 597
Formats: txt mbr lrf rtf
ePub file: 1780 kb
Fb2 file: 1315 kb

Home John Buchan The Gap in the Curtain. There was a batch of important Dominion appeals before the Judicial Committee, in every one of which I was engaged, and I had some heavy cases in the Commercial Court

Home John Buchan The Gap in the Curtain. There was a batch of important Dominion appeals before the Judicial Committee, in every one of which I was engaged, and I had some heavy cases in the Commercial Court. Of the two juniors who did most of my devilling one had a big patent-law action of his own, and the other was in a nursing home with appendicitis.

Home John Buchan The Gap in the Curtain. An association book-say one which Walter Scott presented to Wordsworth with an autograph inscription- can never be duplicated. The gap in the curtain, . 5. These things are better than banknotes- they are solid bullion. He simply could not hold the House-could hold it far less than Lanyard, who had a voice like a peahen, or John Fortingall, who stuttered and hesitated and rarely got a verb into his sentences. 9. At his first appearance he had shown an amazing gift of catching the atmosphere of the assembly and gripping its attention in a vice. His air had had authority in it, his voice had been compelling, his confidence had impressed without offending. great God! he seemed a different man.

Part of the action is autobiographical, featuring the agonies of a contemporary up-and-coming politician.

The Gap in the Curtain is a supernatural story. Led by an Einsteinian professor, five characters are able to see a copy of The London John Buchan was an author, a lawyer, an historian, and a politician (including being Governor General of Canada in the last years of his life). In his writing career he is perhaps best known for his 1915 spy-thriller, The 39 Steps, which was made into a movie by Alfred Hitchcock in 1935.

John Buchan, Baron Tweedsmuir, was a Scottish diplomat, barrister, journalist, historian, poet and novelist. He wrote adventure novels, short-story collections and biographies. His passion for the Scottish countryside is reflected in much of his writing. Buchan's adventure stories are high in romance and are peopled by a large cast of characters. Richard Hannay, Dickson McCunn and Sir Edward Leithen are three that reappear several times. Alfred Hitchcock adapted his most famous book The Thirty-Nine Steps, featuring Hannay, for the big screen

John Buchan footsteps meeting you, And all things going as they came. Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Portrait MoreLess Show More Show Less.

This book contains the classic supernatural novel 'The Gap In the Curtain', by the well-known John Buchan. The story is set in a country house, where guests are enabled by an eccentric scientist to see a glimpse of their futures. An entertaining read full of suspense, this book is highly recommended read. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Read Books Lt. eleased: Apr 16, 2013ISBN: 9781447481010Format: book.

As a long-time fan of John Buchan, I especially enjoyed my re-reading of "Gap In The Curtain". The typesetting within the book is attractive and skillful. No introduction or textual notes were provided, but when reading Buchan one does just fine without such decorations

As a long-time fan of John Buchan, I especially enjoyed my re-reading of "Gap In The Curtain". At a weekend gathering in the country, several people are enabled to glimpse certain items that will be printed in the newspaper exactly one year in the future. The author proceeds to show his readers how this information is used by each individual. No introduction or textual notes were provided, but when reading Buchan one does just fine without such decorations. As a 'first-rate second-tier author' generally, Buchan is near the height of his authorial vigor in The Gap in the Curtain.

This book contains the classic supernatural novel 'The Gap In the Curtain', by the well-known John Buchan. The story is set in a country house, where guests are enabled by an eccentric scientist to see a glimpse of their futures. An entertaining read full of suspense, this book is highly recommended read.
Spilberg
This book is actually not particularly suspenseful and so is not a thriller like Buchan's "The Thirty-Nine Steps." Nonetheless, I found it tremendously enjoyable. As one of the other reviewer's notes, the story involves several guests at an English country house in the early 1930s who each gets a very brief glimpse of a different page from the London Times one year in the future. Buchan is a superb writer and I found his account of the fates of these people very well done. However, you need to have some interest in England in the 1930s to truly appreciate this book. A couple of the story threads involve the political maneuverings in the British Parliament in the early 1930s as the Great Depression threw the normal party alignments into disarray. Naturally, these events were more interesting to people in England in 1932 when this book was published than they will be to readers in the contemporary U.S. One of the other reviewers found these parts of the book boring, but I think Buchan writes so well that they remain interesting.

A couple of points: The book starts a bit slowly and the best of the story threads is the one that ends the book. In fact, I found the last story thread to be quite moving. So, don't abandon the book too early! Finally, [SPOILER ALERT] I found the twist at the end a bit farfetched, but it didn't spoil the book for me, particularly as it allowed for a happy ending.
Hilarious Kangaroo
As a long-time fan of John Buchan, I especially enjoyed my re-reading of "Gap In The Curtain". At a weekend gathering in the country, several people are enabled to glimpse certain items that will be printed in the newspaper exactly one year in the future. The author proceeds to show his readers how this information is used by each individual. Buchan always writes in an entertaining manner, but his ingenuity in crafting these gripping narratives provides a unique contribution to his collection of novels. There are plenty of twists and turns, and some genuinely interesting insights into the way people think and act. Read it; you won't be disappointed.
Gaua
I'm not sure which I liked more, the story or the quality of the old English writing. Read this book purely for fun-to enjoy a wonderful piece of literature.
BeatHoWin
Enjoyed reading it !
greed style
The fairly common question with which I have titled this review is the question Buchan sets out to answer in the course of six chapters in this adventure starring Sir Edward Leithen, quasi-autobiographical lawyer and MP. The first chapter sets the scene: a fancy dinner party attended by a ‘mad scientist’ leads to Sir Edward and six others from the dinner party being handpicked to test the professor’s cutting-edge theories about time. At the climax of the chapter, each person sees an issue of The Times dated one year in the future, and in each case notices a paragraph or headline that relates directly to them. The remaining five chapters, each dedicated to an attendant other than Sir Edward (the sixth human guinea pig fainted prior to viewing the ‘gap in the curtain’), explore how humans in different stations and mental states respond to having ‘seen beyond’. Although the snippets of the paper previsioned by each person are indeed printed verbatim, signifying the professor’s experiment was successful, the prescribed fate does not always occur in the manner one might expect. Although containing faint ‘trademarks’ of a Buchan novel (references to the classics, men who are MEN!, allusions to The Pilgrim’s Progress, distrust of socialism), this novel focuses more intently on the psychology of the characters and on emotional dynamics than many of Buchan’s novels; it is also more heavily autobiographical. This is certainly one of Buchan’s better written works, and frequently ranges into “five-star” territory in many respects, but not frequently enough to push it over the (very high) barrier between my four-star and five-star ratings.

I am absolutely delighted with the edition released by House of Stratus, a small publisher that puts certain more careless small publishers to shame. The cover image is mildly relevant to the contents and the front and back covers are quite serviceable with respect to both aesthetics and content. A brief biographical blurb of Buchan is provided inside. The typesetting within the book is attractive and skillful. No introduction or textual notes were provided, but when reading Buchan one does just fine without such decorations.

As a 'first-rate second-tier author' generally, Buchan is near the height of his authorial vigor in The Gap in the Curtain. Devotees of Buchan; enjoyers of Haggard, Kipling, and Stevenson; and appreciators of psychological novels will likely find this a pleasant read.
Maximilianishe
A well written story with an mysterious plot. Loved It
Mr_TrOlOlO
The reviewer below has done a good job of summarizing the basic premise of this book's plot: a country-house party is given the opportunity to see for an instant the front page of the Times a year hence. Each member sees something affecting himself, and the rest of the book tells what each one did with the knowledge gained thereby.

As a premise, this is great. Unfortunately, Buchan allows his story to become bogged down with uninteresting characters in contrived situations. Perhaps the up-and-coming politician's story was interesting to an Englishman in the 1930s, but today it seems dull indeed. Form a coalition government already! Or something! Don't agonize over what to do for months on end.

Ultimately, I feel that this book fails as a thriller because it can't make the dramas playing out in its characters' lives have much meaning to the reader.
At a country house gathering, five guests are chosen by a brilliant scientist to take part in a shocking experiment which will let them glimpse one year into the future. However, when the experiment takes place, two of the guests see their own obituaries in The Times newspaper, one year hence. Will they be able to change their destinies? Read this book and find out!
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