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eBook Walt Disney's Donald Duck: A Christmas For Shacktown (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library Vol. 11) (Vol. 11) (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library) ePub

by Gary Groth,Carl Barks

eBook Walt Disney's Donald Duck: A Christmas For Shacktown (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library Vol. 11) (Vol. 11)  (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library) ePub
Author: Gary Groth,Carl Barks
Language: English
ISBN: 160699574X
ISBN13: 978-1606995747
Publisher: Fantagraphics Books; 1 edition (November 20, 2012)
Pages: 240
Category: Comic Strips
Subcategory: Graphic Comics
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 493
Formats: rtf mobi lrf lrf
ePub file: 1805 kb
Fb2 file: 1343 kb

Carl Barks is one of the all time great comic writer/artists and volume 11 presents some of his most famous stories

Carl Barks is one of the all time great comic writer/artists and volume 11 presents some of his most famous stories. Unlike fellow Disney cartoonist Floyd Gottfredson, Barks preferred to keep his creations separate from the rest of the Disney universe so you'll never, for instance, see Mickey Mouse wander into a story. The book finishes with some informative essay's on each of the stories featured in the volume and a short biography on Carl Barks.

A Christmas For Shacktown is a classic Christmas story where the Duck family wants to do something different during the holiday season by helping the less fortunate families of Shacktown have a great Christmas.

The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library is a series of books collecting all of the comic book Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge stories written and drawn by Carl Barks, originally published between 1942 and Barks' retirement in June 1966. The series was launched in late 2011, and will comprise 6,000 pages over roughly 30 200- to 240-page volumes when it is finished. The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library has been translated and published in Italy, Brazil and Russia.

From 1942 to 1966, Carl Barks was the most prolific and beloved creator of comic book stories featuring Donald Duck .

From 1942 to 1966, Carl Barks was the most prolific and beloved creator of comic book stories featuring Donald Duck, Scrooge McDuck, and all the rest of Duckburg's wacky denizens. The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library series reprints Barks's classic stories, with fully restored original coloring and fascinating historical and critical essays by a hand-picked group of Barks experts. This series includes: Vols. Walt Disney’s Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown (Vol. 11). Walt Disney’s Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man (Vol. 12). Walt Disney’s Donald Duck: Trick or Treat (Vol. 13). Walt Disney’s Uncle Scrooge: The Seven Cities of Gold (Vol. 14).

Book Format: Hardcover . The second volume of Fantagraphics' reprinting of Carl Barks's classic Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge work, like last spring's Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man, focuses on the early 1950s, universally considered one of Barks's very peak periods

The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library is a series of books published by Fantagraphics Books, collecting all of the Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge comic book stories written and drawn by Carl Barks.

The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library is a series of books published by Fantagraphics Books, collecting all of the Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge comic book stories written and drawn by Carl Barks, originally published between late 1942 and Barks' retirement in June 1966. The series was launched in late 2011, and will comprise 6000 pages over roughly 30 240-page volumes when it is finished.

Synopses by Michael Barrier from "Carl Barks and the Art of the Comic Book" (M. Lilien, 1982). from Walt Disney's Donald Duck Adventures, The Barks/Rosa Collection (Gemstone, 2007 series) (September 2008). This was published after volume twelve. The next one published was volume six. 1st printing: 2012; 2nd printing: October 2013. Parts of this issue are reprinted: from Walt Disney's Donald Duck Adventures, The Barks/Rosa Collection (Gemstone, 2007 series) (September 2008). from Four Color (Dell, 1942 series) - Walt Disney's Donald Duck and the Golden Helmet (July-August 1952).

The Walking Dead: The Complete Nint. 11. Twin Peaks: From Z to A. 9. Shazam! 4K. 10. Upgrade. 12. Alita: Battle Angel 4K + 3D. 13. Iron Man 4K. 14.

Walt Disney's Donald Duck book . Start by marking Walt Disney's Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Originally published in 1951, A Christmas for Shacktown is one of Barks' masterpieces: A rare, 32-pager that stays within the The third volume of Fantagraphics' reprinting of Carl Barks' classic Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge work - like last spring's Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man - focuses on the early 1950s, universally considered one of Barks.

Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "A Christmas For Shacktown" (Vol. 0) (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library). Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Anchored by the Dickensian “A Christmas for Shacktown,” this volume collects the universally beloved comics adventures of Donald Duck, his nephews Huey, Dewey and Louie, and his Uncle Scrooge.

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} The second volume of Fantagraphics’ reprinting of Carl Barks’s classic Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge work, like last spring’s Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man, focuses on the early 1950s, universally considered one of Barks’s very peak periods. Originally published in 1951, “A Christmas for Shacktown” is one of Barks’s masterpieces: A rare 32-pager that stays within the confines of Duckburg, featuring a storyline in which the Duck family works hard to raise money to throw a Christmas party for the poor children of the city’s slums (depicted by Barks with surprisingly Dickensian grittiness), and climaxing in one of the most memorable images Barks ever created, the terrifying bottomless pit that swallows up all of Scrooge’s money. But there’s lots more gold to be found in this volume (literally), which features both the “The Golden Helmet” (a quest off the coast of Labrador for a relic that might grant the finder ownership of America, reducing more than one cast member to a state of Gollum-like covetousness) while “The Gilded Man” features a hunt for a rare stamp in South America—two more of Barks’s thrilling full-length adventure stories. But that’s less than half the volume! This volume also features ten of Barks’s smart and funny 10-pagers, including a double whammy of yarns co-starring Donald’s insufferable cousin (“Gladstone’s Usual Very Good Year” and “Gladstone’s Terrible Secret”), as well as another nine of Barks’s rarely seen one-page Duck gags… all painstakingly recolored to match the original coloring as exactly as possible, and supplemented with an extensive series of notes and behind-the-scenes essays by the foremost Duck experts in the world. This is the second volume of Donald Duck, it's the official vol. 11 in the series chronologically.
Bolanim
Yes, this indeed is volume 11. The usually impeccable Fantagraphics seems a little unsure as to how it will hande the Complete Carl Barks Disney Library which theoretically when complete will have reprinted all the Carl Barks stories done for Disney. The first book released, "Lost in the Andes", makes no mention of a volume but presents stories from 1948 and 1949 despite Barks drawing and writing Donald Duck stories as far back as 1943. This volume contains stories from 1951 and 1952 hence volume 11 despite it being only the third Carl Barks book published in this series. The Uncle Scrooge book, "Only a Poor Man", is listed inside as volume 12. I can only guess that Fantagraphics is trying to lead with Barks best material since this volume is regarded as arguably Barks best period.

Carl Barks is one of the all time great comic writer/artists and volume 11 presents some of his most famous stories. Unlike fellow Disney cartoonist Floyd Gottfredson, Barks preferred to keep his creations separate from the rest of the Disney universe so you'll never, for instance, see Mickey Mouse wander into a story. It was Barks who created Duckburg, Gladstone Gander, Scrooge McDuck, The Junior Woodchucks and The Beagle Boys and Barks preferred to stick with his creations. It's interesting that Donald lives in a city called Duckburg since he, Daisy and his family appear to be the only ducks in town. If I had one complaint about Barks art it would be that most of the residents of Duckburg are flesh colored humanoids with animal snouts and floppy ears. Gottfredson went with fully anthropomorphic animal characters but Barks' appear more like human mutants.

One story with Gyro Gearloose brings up a dilemma that Floyd Gottfredson found himself in; how do you mix anthropomorphic animals with real animals and why do some animals have human intelligence and others animal intelligence. Gearloose invents a machine that gives intelligence to animals including a wolf and rabbit who become capable of speaking with Donald who is of course a duck. If that were not weird enough the wolf disguises itself as a resident of Duckburg with the pink skin, animal snout and floppy ears and considers himself disguised as a dog. So now Disney has Goofy (an anthropomorphic dog), Pluto (an actual dog) and now pink skinned bipedal dog like creatures. As if that weren't enough the ducks refer to themselves as "human beings" and in one scene the duck family comes across some ducks stuffed and mounted and they look real so just like with dogs there appear to be anthropomorphic ducks and real ducks.

I may not love the rendering of the pink skinned animal hybrids but in every other way Barks art is spectacular. Not only is he consistent and clean in his drawing of the ducks but his backgrounds are often magnificent. Barks was able to give scope and size to his art that seems to defy the limitations of his medium. In one comic the bottom drops out of Scrooge McDuck's moneybin and the gapping hole that Barks draws looks absolutely massive. Barks was also able to draw landscapes like South American jungles and Polynesian islands in gorgeous detail. Barks high quality is far above other comic artists working at the time. He also wrote exceptionally smart stories. The ducks are very intelligent and resourceful and good role models for children. When I was young reading these stories I felt like I was being both entertained and informed at the same time.

Fantagraphics always does a great job with their comic collections and this one is no exception. I'm not thrilled with the covers of the Complete Carl Barks Disney Library but besides that it's a top notch job. The dimensions of the books are the same size as the original comics and the colors are beautiful. The book finishes with some informative essay's on each of the stories featured in the volume and a short biography on Carl Barks. Between the Carl Barks collection and Floyd Gottfredson's Mickey Mouse, fans of Disney comics can hardly ask for more.
Ramsey`s
This is second of FBI's hardcover reprints of Carl Barks's Duck stories that focuses on Donald Duck. Overall, its actually the 11th volume (as noted in the indicia and notes at the end. This one reprints Carl Barks materials from Dell "Four Color" (also known as "One Shots") #367, 408, 422, and "Walt Disney Comics and Stories" #135-144.

Growing up I read many Walt Disney Comics. One of my main sources was the great "Walt Disney Comics Digest" put out by Gold Key Comics/Western Publications. I liked many of the comics they reprinted, but among the best were the "duck stories", especially the longer Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge adventures, by Carl Barks (tho like many of us, I would learn who Barks was many years later).

There have been many attempts at reprinting this material. The most recently was the softcover volumes by Gladstone comics of Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge stuff (include Gyro Gearloose). I have some of those, but not all.

I figured what with all the Duck stuff I'd read, that I would be familiar with most of the stuff, atleast the longer stories. So its interesting to see 'new' stuff.

While this one is a Donald Duck volume, you have Uncle Scrooge in several, along with Donald's nephews, cousin Gladstone Gander, and Gyro Gearloose.

There are several long stories:

"A Christmas for Shacktown"- a story of giving, but also one that includes info on Uncle Scrooge's Money Bin (which in the stories in this volume takes on its final form). This story has Daisy, Donald, Uncle Scrooge, Huey, Dewey, and Louise, and Gladstone Gander.

"Big Bin on Killmotor Hill", which has Uncle Scrooge bin on Killmotor Hill. This story also introduces the Beagle Boys.

"Gladstone's Usual Good Year" is one of several stories that focuses on super lucky Gladstone Gander. Another is "Gladstone's Terrible Secret" and a third is "Gemstone Hunters".

"The Screaming Cowboy" is another funny Donald & nephews story.

"Statuesque Spendthrifts", while a Donald story, is more of an Uncle Scrooge. This is a new one for me, with Scrooge competing against another claimant to being the richest man in the world.

"Think Box Bollix" is more of a Gearloose story, tho it stars Donald.

"The Golden Helmet" is a classic Donald Duck adventure story. Don Rosa did a sequel to it, and the pair were reprinted in the last of Gemstone Barks/Rosa collections (which I sadly missed).

"The Gilded Man" is another classic Donald Duck adventure story that I've heard of, but never read.

"Houseboat Holiday" is a nice little Donald & nephews stories.

"Spending Money" is a funny story with Donald and Uncle Scrooge.

The volume is filled out with various short 1-4 page stories.

At the end of the volume, we get some great set of story notes.

I look forward to the next volume, which has already been announced.
Qumenalu
When I was a kid reading Donald Duck comic books, I had no idea who Carl Barks was. But as I have begun purchasing these volumes, I have come to realize that were my favorite stories. To savor each of them--reproduced here in flawless color in a hardcover edition that preserves them so they can be enjoyed again and again--is wonderful. More than a trip down memory lane, these are for anyone who appreciates humor and storytelling of far greater quality than much of what is available today. Like the "Chronological Donald" video series, they are dated in various ways and include certain stereotypes (some of them unfortunate) that are nonetheless representative of the era in which they were created. That being said, even these shortcomings are small when kept in historical perspective and do not unduly mar the quality of Carl Barks's work.
Quttaro
I believe that any comments I could possibly make here could only lessen the absolute perfection and the majesty that Carl Barks created. It has all been said by others who are more knowledgeable than I. For my small part, I will venture to say, in all humility, that my love for these comics started when I was a child, and has endured - and even magnified - into adulthood. Somehow, in my innocence as a child, I thought that I would “outgrow” these comics when I reached my maturity. But, how wrong was my earnest naiveté. Now, with my youth far behind me, do I see that these “comics” (badly named, for certain) will always fill me with everything that is lacking in the world in which I must endure.
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