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eBook X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. 3) ePub

by Sean Chen,Chris Claremont

eBook X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. 3) ePub
Author: Sean Chen,Chris Claremont
Language: English
ISBN: 0785116923
ISBN13: 978-0785116929
Publisher: Marvel (September 20, 2006)
Pages: 152
Category: Graphic Novels
Subcategory: Graphic Comics
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 668
Formats: lit lrf mobi doc
ePub file: 1277 kb
Fb2 file: 1196 kb

Author: Chris Claremont. Views: 151. Read X-Men: The End: Book 3: Men & X-Men Comic Online.

Author: Chris Claremont. X-Men: The End: Book 3: Men & X-Men 11/24/18.

X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. 3)Paperback. Still it is Claremonts story and without him we would not have the X-men we know today. So maybe we just have to give him this one, without much of a fuss.

X-Men: The End: Book 3: Men & X-Men 6 issues. Volume Published by Marvel. The final end of the X-men. Header 4. Header 3. Header 2. Quote.

Writer: Chris Claremont. Publication date: March 2006 - August 2006. Issue Issue Issue Issue Issue #2.

X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men. Chen's art, as always, is very good. 0785116923 (ISBN13: 9780785116929). Aug 17, 2019 Tim B rated it really liked it. Shelves: related. In Universe 41001, the X-Men are fighting the Shiar again. Kitty Pryde is running for mayor of Chicago. Brian Braddock is a X-Man (very minimal role (not much more than a cameo)). Chris Claremont is a writer of American comic books, best known for his 16-year (1975-1991) stint on Uncanny X-Men, during which the series became one of the comic book industry's most successful properties.

Chris Claremont, Sean Chen. X-Men: The End Trilogy. this is the end?? By Thriftbooks. com User, January 18, 2008.

X-Men – The End Book 1 – 3 (2004-2006) : X-Men: The End is a 2004-2006 trilogy of miniseries published in the USA by Marvel Comics, detailing the last days of the X-Men and their adventures in an alternative future. The series, which was part of Marvel’s The End line of books, was written by Chris Claremont and drawn by Sean Chen, with cover art by Greg Land and Gene Ha. The first part of the miniseries is titled Dreamers and Demons, the second Heroes and Martyrs, and the third Men and X-Men.

Items related to X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. 3). Claremont, Chris X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. ISBN 13: 9780785116929. X-Men: The End Book Three: Men and X-Men (Bk. Claremont, Chris. ISBN 10: 0785116923 ISBN 13: 9780785116929. Publisher: Marvel, 2006.

Collects X-MEN: THE END - MEN AND X-MEN.

X-Men: The End - Men and X-Men (2006) #1.

X-Men: The End is a 2004-2006 trilogy of miniseries published by Marvel Comics, detailing the last .

X-Men: The End is a 2004-2006 trilogy of miniseries published by Marvel Comics, detailing the last days of the X-Men and their adventures in an alternative future. The series, which was part of Marvel's The End line of books, was written by Chris Claremont and drawn by Sean Chen, with cover art by Greg Land and Gene Ha. The first part of the miniseries is titled Dreamers and Demons, the second Heroes and Martyrs, and the third Men and X-Men

The endgame of the last tale of Marvel's most popular mutants begins! They've suffered through sneak attacks, betrayals, and fatalities - now, Professor X and Magneto are taking the fight back to the enemy, amidst the stars! Collects X-Men: The End: Men and X-Men #1-6.
Morlurne
I will be forever grateful to the work that Chris Claremont for his work on the X-Men from 1975 to 1991. That was among the most significant runs in comics. During much of that time, the X-Men was the most important book to read. Mr. Claremont is responsible for creating an astonishing number of X-Men, mutants and villains.

Marvel has not coordinated it's "The End of " series with any kind of schedule. Stories have appeared randomly over the last decade and a half. The Hulk's end is decent; Wolverine's...not so much (Millar's Old Man Logan is far better, but that became a new beginning). The End of the Marvel Universe was quite weak. The Daredevil story is good and the Punisher's story is great (the best so far).

This one is midling. There are TOO many characters. TOO much conflict. Claremont apparently felt the need to jam in every villain from a 20 year period into this tale. The exposition and dialogue are weak. All that said, it is nice to have Claremont back on the X-Men (clearly I'm look at this with rose-colored glasses...any other writer and I'd probably with this a 1 or 1.5). He kills off most of the characters and the ending is a bit weak. Claremont has the X-Men fight Sinister, the Brood, the Shi'ar, and Cassandra Nova (wasn't familiar with that character - who is pretty lame). Magneto steals the scenes he is in.

I've thought about the ending a lot over the last few days, and I like the choice of the X-Man that is the best fit to carry on Xavier's message in the 21st century.
Lo◘Ve
Chris Claremont offers an epic conclusion for “X-Men: The End” in this third volume. Claremont does a fine job of wrapping things up, finishing up a sweeping story with perhaps too many characters and subplots (which is, admittedly, par for the course with the writer). Still, Claremont offers a satisfying ending for some of the most beloved characters in comics and does so with an exciting story with plenty of fine moments humanizing his cast. There can be some quibbles of course (why didn’t Magneto play more of a role?) but, for the most part, this is a fine conclusion for the X-Men even if the surprise villain underwhelms. The art team, led by Sean Chen, does a fine job. This is easily the best volume of the trilogy and I would give it 4.5 stars if possible which rounds up my rating. Highly recommended.
Fenritaur
After Cypher was killed in The New Mutants, I was mad. What a waste! A mutant with the gift of communication? Hello? That was who could bridge the gap. I wrote my own story then of a future timeline where he lived. He and Kitty married and she ultimately became president and he was secretary of state. This was not quite 28 years ago. Nice to see Claremont wasn't too far off himself! I have been out of the comic book world for too long, but it seems Doug returned during a different storyline. They don't show who the father is of Kitty's kids, but I am going believe Cypher was involved.

So much better that all those apocalyptic futures. With the movie sure to.render Days of Future Past kitschy, I vote for story lines that lead to this possible future.
Beardana
A great book that was lots of fun to read.
asAS
This series started out ok and went downhill fast. Felt too stretched out and got dull with repetitive action sequences and too much death. Just a bland entry in the series.
Syleazahad
The good thing about the series is the overwhelming tsunami of action that will keep hearts jackhammering in the chests of true X-fans. While "The End" doesn't always bring about a true conclusion in some books in the Marvel series, the X-Men are certainly getting hit where it hurts from beginning to end -- and fans should be ready to watch their favorites fall in a variety of horrible ways.

It's all-out war on mutants, generated largely because of a conflict among alien races the X-Men and other mutant groups have confronted over the years. And that means pulling out all the stops, with overwhelming forces that simply cannot be halted with fisticuffs and a quick quip.

It's certainly a different face on comics, where regular readers know their favorite characters are never in any real danger. (Actual deaths are rare, after all, and are almost always foreshadowed far in advance as "events" that usually aren't permanent anyway.)

But there's badness here, too, particularly for those of us who aren't diehard X-readers. Sometimes it feels like this is a "cast of thousands" production and, often, I found myself wondering who the heck some of these folks were. It's hard to get wrapped up in the fates of strangers, and the absence of much real backstory on them makes for a bewildering read.

Even worse, however, is the pace with which "X-Men: The End" unfolds. While nonstop action -- filled with major developments, sudden twists and tragic deaths, no less -- can be a very entertaining storytelling technique, there are some limits that must be observed. In this case, things happen so quickly that readers don't have much time to digest one turn of events before they're on to the next. Writer Chris Claremont juggles numerous threads so wildly that it's easy to get confused, and the potential impact of the big stuff is diminished accordingly. Did someone just die? Oh well, worry about it later.

Among the various bad guys at work here, however, the prominent use of Charles Xavier's evil twin -- yes, you read that right, his evil twin -- is a weak choice. And, by story's end, some readers might feel the tone is a little too preachy, as X-books are prone to do, as Xavier's "why can't we all just get along and leave in peace?" agenda is pushed.

by Tom Knapp, Rambles.(n e t) editor
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