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eBook Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present, Fourth Edition ePub

by Spencer M. DiScala

eBook Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present, Fourth Edition ePub
Author: Spencer M. DiScala
Language: English
ISBN: 0813344131
ISBN13: 978-0813344133
Publisher: Routledge; 4th edition (January 1, 2009)
Pages: 504
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 733
Formats: rtf docx lit azw
ePub file: 1666 kb
Fb2 file: 1502 kb

With helpful maps, pithy biographies and an unmatched bibliographical essay, it is perhaps the best introductory text for students and stimulating for scholars as well. Well organized and elegantly written, it serves as an ideal introduction to the serious study of modern Italy.

Di Scala's book covers Italy from 1700 to the present. He divides it into several sections relating to the time periods in Italy.

Hardcover: 520 pages. Di Scala's book covers Italy from 1700 to the present.

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Emphasizing globalization, Italy traces the country's transformation from a land of. .

Emphasizing globalization, Italy traces the country's transformation from a land of emigration to one o. This essential book fills a serious gap in the field by synthesizing modern Italian history and placing it in a fully European context. Emphasizing globalization, Italy traces the country's transformation from a land of emigration to one of immigration and its growing cultural importance. Author Spencer M. Di Scala discusses the role of women, gives ample attention to the Italian South, and provides a picture of how ordinary Italians live.

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The profound revolution that destroyed the political system that had governed Italy for fifty years stimulated fears of great instability and hopes of a profound renewal.

The profound revolution that destroyed the political system that had.

Spencer M Discala Author Spencer M. Di Scala discusses the role of women, gives ample attention to the Italian South, and provides a picture of how ordinary Italians live

Walmart 9780813344133.

This essential book fills a serious gap in the field by synthesizing modern Italian history and placing it in a fully European context. Emphasizing globalization, Italy traces the country’s transformation from a land of emigration to one of immigration and its growing cultural importance.

Recommend this journal. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

This essential book fills a serious gap in the field by synthesizing modern Italian history and placing it in a fully European context. Emphasizing globalization, Italy traces the country's transformation from a land of emigration to one of immigration and its growing cultural importance. Including coverage of the April 2008 elections, this updated edition offers expanded examinations of contemporary Italy's economic, social, and cultural development, a deepened discussion on immigration, and four new biographical sketches. Author Spencer M. Di Scala discusses the role of women, gives ample attention to the Italian South, and provides a picture of how ordinary Italians live. Cast in a clear and lively style that will appeal to readers, this comprehensive account is an indispensable addition to the field.
Nilarius
Kindle review:
This book has been fairly well kindlized with some important exceptions. The footnotes work well going back and forth. The maps are fairly useless unless you look at them on your PC or you have far better eyes than mine. There are plenty of data tables which are inserted in the text more or less where they need to be. But there is no clear separation from the text so the transition to and from the tables can be jarring. This is true also of the 'portraits'- very short biographies of major figures that are interspersed throughout the text and which can be quite interesting.
Finally, the book has an index which the publisher has made no attempt to kindlize. Since the publisher also chooses to offer the book without page numbers the index is useless in the Kindle format. When will publishers appreciate that the more they adapt their publication for electronic formats, the more they will make that format attractive to readers?
Overall Kindle (paperwhite) reading experience- 3 stars.

The book itself is worth about two to three stars. I am obviously somewhere in between the two previous reviewers. I think DiScala does a great job up until WW2 considering the likely audience for the book- college students looking for an entrance to modern Italian history or the lay reader looking for something not too scholarly.

And now a personal complaint that may be more about me than DiScala- There are no footnotes, not even for quotes. I hate this trend in scholarly works. DiScala provides a very good annotated bibliographic essay that covers every section but there is no way to know who said what unless he (very) occasionally decides to identify the source in the text. This alone accounts for my downgrading the rating from three stars to two. If that sort of lazy scholarship is okay for you then consider this a three star review.

DiScala does a good job quickly sketching the European context for Italian history throughout the early parts of the book. He also does a good job talking about the influence of the Catholic church on Italian politics and society. This part of the book (which takes up five of the six parts or about 5/7ths of the text) can be recommended unless you want to get petty.

The last part of the book however is a bit of a mess, at least, to me.
Now let me be honest. As a self-critical reader, I have long noted that when I am reading something that is coming from a POV quite different than my own, that it is far easier to note all the assumptions the author is making and all of the rhetoric they are using than when I am reading something that I agree with fundamentally.
I suspect DiScala's politics to be to the right of mine and therefore my hermeneutic when reading this book is more suspicious than generous. For example, around location 4690, (the first paragraph of Chapter 16) he states that "excessive liberty and the economic and social effects of the [WW1]" help explain the rise of fascism. Whenever I read a phrase like "excessive liberty", I want a darn good explanation of what that means. All DiScala offers is the assertion that "Italians probably enjoyed more civil liberties than the citizens of most European countries and the United States". No evidence of any kind is offered in support.

Another example from around location 5593 (the chapter entitled WWII and The Resistance):
"Journalist Giampaolo Pansa has claimed that the Communists exploited their military superiority and the chaos following the war's end to kill thousands of non-Fascist Resistance fighters in order to eliminate as many rivals as possible for the future political control of the economy."
There is no other reference than just the statement of one journalist, there is no reference to that journalist's writing that contains that assertion, there is nothing at all to back it up. Even if it were true (and I suspect it is at least partially true) this is not scholarship. This is not teaching by example how to write history.

One more example, this one exemplifying how you can editorialize while pretending to just state facts. This is from Location 6126 and is toward the end of the chapter entitled "Years of Lead": [Referring to the PCI, the Italian Communist Party]"Despite declared PCI autonomy from Moscow, many Italians were still unwilling to entrust PCI members with power". Always be on your guard when someone asserts, "Many people believe.." or "Some experts think..." They are almost always euphemisms for "I think or believe this but I don't want to be bothered with proving the point". Again- this is not history.

The worst part of all this is that sometimes DIScala has an interesting tale to tell. I found his telling of the scandal of the early 1990s that was perhaps even more impactive than Watergate on American politics to be fascinating. I have the feeling that DiScala could write a far more coherent history than he has in this book.

Overall recommendation: Read it in the paperback if read it you must. I have a copy of Martin Clark's history of Modern Italy which I will read soon and review. I can only hope it is stronger. One caveat: If you are more of a centrist in American politics or, may the Dog (Anubis) help you, a Reagan Republican, you may enjoy this book far more than I did. You will definitely find your politics more in line with the author and that's okay. The good thing about democracy is that we get to work at least some of this stuff out at the polls. See you there, my fellow citizens.
Ieregr
I found this to be an outstanding overview of Italian history from 1700 to the present. Granted, covering 300 years is a lot of work, but not every year and person is important. Di Scala has done an excellent job of focusing on key persons and events, placing them in context, and then weaving all of this into a very readable narrative. Those looking for a single volume covering Italy and its rise to a modern economic power would do well to consider this book.
Cktiell
(This review refers to the third edition) This books attempts to cover 300 years of Italian history in fewer than 400 pages (not counting a 68-page bibliographical essay at the end). This overly-ambitious work skips rather quickly through the rich history of Italy, from the Enlightenment, through the Unification, the World Wars, and beyond, devoting only 10 to 20 pages to each era; only two topics seem more worthy of the authors attention, as he spends 30 pages on both "Cavour and the Piedmontese Solution" and "Mussolini's Italy". While the Italians as a people are still ashamed of the period of Fascism, the author tries to put a positive spin on the ideology of the Fascist Party. By contrast, the author uses fewer than 20 pages per chapter to describe Italy's experiences in each of the World Wars.

By focusing so strongly on the political changes in Italy, the author seems to discount the many other factors that make Italy a beautiful and fascinating place, both to visit in the present and to study in its history. The people of this country have played pivotal roles in shaping Italy, its culture, and its history. The Italians are very proud of their ability to rebuild their devastated country after World War II, and yet the author's absolute focus on the political machines nearly obviates the will and determination of the Italian people.

I was hoping to learn more about Italian history from the this book, and I was disappointed. I am sorry I bought it.
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