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eBook The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War (New Narratives in American History) ePub

by William L. Barney

eBook The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War (New Narratives in American History) ePub
Author: William L. Barney
Language: English
ISBN: 0195314352
ISBN13: 978-0195314359
Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 14, 2007)
Pages: 272
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 279
Formats: rtf azw mbr lrf
ePub file: 1760 kb
Fb2 file: 1985 kb

William Barney carefully shows how Walter Lenoir himself hated to punish his slaves but did it anyway to set an. .

William Barney carefully shows how Walter Lenoir himself hated to punish his slaves but did it anyway to set an example for the other slaves, and how Lenoir like many other Southerners of his time, despised slavery but depended on it. To him, it was evil but necessary. The war itself and its aftermath is what turned Lenoir into a confederate, and Barney traces that change in thought and attitude subtly in clear,enjoyable prose. Published on January 2, 2013.

In The Making of a Confederate, William L. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North . For Lenoir and many fellow Confederates, the war never really ended. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities. Born into a wealthy slaveholding family, Lenoir abhorred the institution, opposed secession, and planned to leave his family to move to Minnesota, in the free North. As he tells this compelling story, Barney offers new insights into the ways that (selective) memory informs history; through Lenoir's life, readers learn how individual choices can transform abstract historical processes into concrete actions.

The Making of a Confederate book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Making of a Confederate book. Despite the advances of the civil rights movement, many. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War (New Narratives in American History) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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William Barney carefully shows how Walter Lenoir himself hated to punish his . I really enjoyed this book. Although it teaches us much about history, it is well written and reads like a novel.

book by William L. Barney. William Barney carefully shows how Walter Lenoir himself hated to punish his slaves but did it anyway to set an example for the other slaves, and how Lenoir like many other Southerners of his time, despised slavery but depended on it.

The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil Wa. 9780195314342 Paperback July 2008

9780195314342 Paperback July 2008. In this compelling story, Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities. The Gentle Subversive: Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, and the Rise of the Environmental Movement. Retail Price to Students

New narratives in American history. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

New narratives in American history. Personal Name: Lenoir, Walter W. Corporate Name: Confederate States of America. North Carolina Infantry Regiment, 37th. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

New Narratives in American History (Paperback). A small book telling the story of how a man living in the South evolved into an officer in the Confederate Army and ultimately into a disaffected and "unreconstructed" bitter enemy of the North even after the Civil War. A sad book in many ways this book shows the other side of the CW. Those who "lost" the war and had a way of life they were living changed forever by the conflict.

Walter Lenoir's Civil War (New Narratives in American History). by William L. Published October 15, 2007 by Oxford University Press, USA.

American Civil War alternate histories are alternate history fiction that focuses on the Civil War (or a lack thereof) ending differently. The most common variant of these detail the victory and survival of the Confederate States. Less common variants include a .

Despite the advances of the civil rights movement, many white southerners cling to the faded glory of a romanticized Confederate past. In The Making of a Confederate, William L. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities. Born into a wealthy slaveholding family, Lenoir abhorred the institution, opposed secession, and planned to leave his family to move to Minnesota, in the free North. But when the war erupted in 1860, Lenoir found another escape route--he joined the Confederate army, an experience that would radically transform his ideals. After the war, Lenoir, like many others, embraced the cult of the Lost Cause, refashioning his memory and beliefs in an attempt to make sense of the war, its causes, and its consequences. While some Southerners sank into depression, aligned with the victors, or fiercely opposed the new order, Lenoir withdrew to his acreage in the North Carolina mountains. There, he pursued his own vision of the South's future, one that called for greater self-sufficiency and a more efficient use of the land.For Lenoir and many fellow Confederates, the war never really ended. As he tells this compelling story, Barney offers new insights into the ways that (selective) memory informs history; through Lenoir's life, readers learn how individual choices can transform abstract historical processes into concrete actions.
Blackstalker
This simi-autobiographical story of Walter Lenoir brings the period before, during, and after the Civil War to life. Told through journal entries laced together by the author using careful research and other primary sources this great little book helps us understand the hard decisions that were made during the Civil War. Why volunteer to fight for the Confederates cause if you profess to be against slavery? Why would one brother choose to fight for the North while another would choose the South? An interesting look into these and many other issues that illustrate the Civil War era.
Ballagar
"The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War" is an interesting view into what made one man commit his life to the Southern Cause of the Confederacy. Although a slave-holder, he did not actually enjoy the problems associated with slavery, nor did any of his family, and it was NOT the reason that he fought the war. He was of the "landed aristocracy" of NW North Carolina but NOT a proponent of slavery, in fact, he wished to move to a non-slaveholding state before the war began. However, once Lincoln called for a massing of troops to fight the secessionist South, Lenoir felt honor-bound, much like Robert E. Lee, to fight for his state and its right to govern itself. He did so, and lost a leg in the process. This book follows him before, during and after the war and shows how a man evolves due to the choices that he makes. I would highly recommend this book to others interested in Southern history, North Carolina history, and/or "Civil" War history. I would particularly recommend this book to those North Carolinians interested in the history of NW North Carolina.
Awene
I'm astonished that a previous reviewer attacked the book because the author does not approve of slave owning. He doesn't. Who does? Neither did the Lenoir family members, who did own slaves. William Barney carefully shows how Walter Lenoir himself hated to punish his slaves but did it anyway to set an example for the other slaves, and how Lenoir like many other Southerners of his time, despised slavery but depended on it. To him, it was evil but necessary. The war itself and its aftermath is what turned Lenoir into a confederate, and Barney traces that change in thought and attitude subtly in clear,enjoyable prose. The book is a beautiful portrait to a troubled and in many ways admirable man and his times.
Antuiserum
Thank you
Zavevidi
Barney really did a good job with the research and the details of the book. I was impressed with the information in the narrative especially about the manner in which economic life changed so drastically during and after the War. However, there were so many misplaced opinions, puritanical judgements, and political correctness placed through out the boot, I soon lost trust in the writer to tell the story from an unbiased manner..

I also have to question the motive of any Northerner who write books about Southerners. They miss the mark because they really can't understand that for so many, slavery was not their motivation for fighting in the war.
Yozshugore
I really enjoyed this book.Although it teaches us much about history, it is well written and reads like a novel.
I must admit that Walter Lenoir is an ancestor of mine but I still highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys learning and reading about the Civil war.
It is a EXCELLENT book!!!
Kudos to the author.
Lcena
Great book!!!!
:) great product was well worth the money good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good
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