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eBook Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) ePub

by Richard Gott

eBook Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) ePub
Author: Richard Gott
Language: English
ISBN: 0300111142
ISBN13: 978-0300111149
Publisher: Yale University Press; First Thus, First printing edition (November 1, 2005)
Pages: 400
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 241
Formats: azw mbr docx txt
ePub file: 1656 kb
Fb2 file: 1781 kb

Richard Gott’s invaluable Cuba: A New History dispelsmany convenient myths. -Adam Feinstein, The Guardian. An excellent addition to Hugh Thomas’s classic Cuba and other more recent histories, this book is highly recommended for public and academic libraries.

Richard Gott’s invaluable Cuba: A New History dispelsmany convenient myths. This delightfully written, nicely illustrated book makes a significant contribution to the burgeoning literature on the Cuban revolution.

In this concise and up-to-date book, British journalist Richard Gott casts a fresh eye on the history of the Caribbean .

In this concise and up-to-date book, British journalist Richard Gott casts a fresh eye on the history of the Caribbean island from its pre-Columbian origins to the present day. He provides a European perspective on a country that is perhaps too frequently seen solely from the American point of view. The author emphasises such little-known aspects of Cuba’s history as its tradition of racism and violence, its black rebellions, the survival of its Indian peoples, and the lasting influence of Spain.

Cuba : A New History by Richard Gott (2005, Paperback). Напишите отзыв первым. The book also offers an original look at aspects of the Revolution, including Castro's relationship with the Soviet Union, military exploits in Africa, and his attempts to promote revolution in Latin America and among American blacks. In a concluding section, Gott tells the extraordinary story of the Revolution's survival in the post-Soviet years.

In this concise and up-to-date book, British journalist Richard Gott casts a fresh eye on the history of the Caribbean island from its pre-Columbian origins to the present day.

Yale University Press, 2005 - 384 sayfa. Cuba: A New History A Yale Nota Bene book Yale Nota bene. This new look at the history of Cuba illuminates the island's entire revolutionary past as well as the most recent decades of the Castro regime. Events in Fidel Castro's island nation often command international attention and just as often inspire controversy. Impassioned debate over situations as diverse as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Elián Gonzáles affair is characteristic not only of modern times but of centuries of Cuban history.

Back to Our Shelves . Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene). Type New Format Paperback ISBN 9780300111149. Author Mr. Richard Gott Publisher Yale University Press Publication Date 2005-11-01 Section Latin America, Caribbean. Events in Fidel Castro’s island nation often command international attention and just as often inspire controversy. Impassioned debate over situations as diverse as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Eli.

Cuba A New History by Richard Gott 9780300111149 (Paperback, 2005) Delivery UK delivery is within 8 to 10 working days. Read full description. Cuba: A New History by Richard Gott (Paperback, 2005). Brand new: lowest price.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Guerrilla movements in Latin America. Coauthors & Alternates.

Place of Publication. A New History by Gott, Richard (Paperback book, 2005). item 2 Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) by Gott, Richard 0300111142 The Cheap Fast -Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) by Gott, Richard 0300111142 The Cheap Fast. item 3 Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) by Gott, Richard 0300111142 The Cheap Fast -Cuba: A New History (Yale Nota Bene) by Gott, Richard 0300111142 The Cheap Fast.

Richard Gott's invaluable Cuba: A New History dispels many convenient myths. Gott, a frequent visitor to the island, guides us through its troubled history, from the first colonisation by the Spanish in 1511 to the present day. It is a savage story. Even Diego de Velásquez, who began with the intention of treating the Indians well, became brutal when they refused to work for foreign invaders.

Events in Fidel Castro’s island nation often command international attention and just as often inspire controversy. Impassioned debate over situations as diverse as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Elián Gonzáles affair is characteristic not only of modern times but of centuries of Cuban history. In this concise and up-to-date book, British journalist Richard Gott casts a fresh eye on the history of the Caribbean island from its pre-Columbian origins to the present day. He provides a European perspective on a country that is perhaps too frequently seen solely from the American point of view. The author emphasizes such little-known aspects of Cuba’s history as its tradition of racism and violence, its black rebellions, the survival of its Indian peoples, and the lasting influence of Spain. The book also offers an original look at aspects of the Revolution, including Castro’s relationship with the Soviet Union, military exploits in Africa, and his attempts to promote revolution in Latin America and among American blacks. In a concluding section, Gott tells the extraordinary story of the Revolution’s survival in the post-Soviet years.

heart of sky
An absolutely solid history of Cuba that contextualized the complexity of Cuban history without either romanticizing or dismissing the Revolution and its aims.

Extra points for its ongoing discussion of race and its impact on Cuban history.

One star missing for almost complete silence on the role of women in Cuba.
Livina
I read this to prepare for my February trip to Cuba. What amazed me, as an American, were just how many times the United States has involved itself in the life of Cubans. I did not realize--as a child of the 1980s--just how connected our two countries are. Once I was in Cuba, I witness the profound connections. This history gave a good taste of what to expect.

For someone interested in preparing before a trip to this challenging country, this is a great book to get an in-depth history, that tells the country's story, beyond the events since Castro took power.
Iriar
I got this in advance of a trip to Cuba but found it just too long and detailed for my level of interest. It is very comprehensive and thorough, and for a scholar it would be great. But for the casual reader or traveler who just wants an overview it's a bit of a slog.
HeonIc
Since visiting Cuba in 1997, I've always been fascinated by the place. Havana is a beautiful city, the weather is great and the people are warm and engaging. The trouble is; the economy simply doesn't work.

Richard Gott has written of the island from its first visits by the Spanish until the present day where it rests within its own time warp. Gott has done an admirable job. However, as with so many books on the subject of Cuba, it's as though its real history doesn't begin until 1959. This is the time of Castro's rise to power and it is where "Cuba: A New History" really comes to life. It is clear that Gott is very familiar with Cuba. It is clear that he has travelled there extensively and interviewed a wide cast of people. He is mildly sympathetic to Cuba treading its own path. But, by the same token, he doesn't fall for left wing jingoism. It is a very good read.

I have little doubt that many will challenge my view. To cover Cuba and not point out its many failings will be seen as a weakness. Yet, the story of Cuba is more nuanced. It has been dominated by three empires and is only now beginning a path of relative independence. This will bring change. Gott clearly understands this point. It is a point missed by his critics who all too often only focus on the many failings of Castro and little else.

I recommend this book to all those general readers seeking an understanding of this island nation and its place in the world. Richard Gott deserves credit. He has added to our knowledge of a small country that has risen above its otherwise backwater place in history.
Funny duck
The author covers the history of Cuba from the 15th century to the present. I had to skip about a hundred pages to get to the 20th century, but plan to go back to the earlier years. Gott is from UK, a bit of a socialist, and never misses a chance to dis the US, but the US hasn't been a good neighbor to Cuba, for sure.

The writing is smooth and readable. A good popular history. Footnotes are collected in the back of the book. Not too easy,not too densely written.
Steel_Blade
Great seller, great book. Very interesting introspection into cuban history. Despite going light on the colonial era the book is very interesting. I might not agree with the opinion at every corner about the facts but well worth the read.
Niwield
Honestly folks, really I needed to come over the pessimistic catastrophic scenarios of contemporary global events and their intrepid interpreters, so here are some books I have recently read instead on Cuban history, on its regional impact and on the Bolivàrian revolution in Venezuela, as an antidote. Despite the massive bibliography on Cuba's revolution, remarkably few books in English cover the island's story from its earliest days. This alone justifies ex-Guardian Latin American specialist Richard Gott's new work, Cuba: A New History, Yale University Press, 2004 [Yale Nota Bene paperback, 2005] 325 pages [alt. 359 incl. Notes]. Like his informative articles on Latin America over the past 40 years, this book is easy to read, comprehensive, thoroughly researched and partisan.
Hugh Thomas's 1971 book, Cuba - the inevitable comparison -starts only in 1762, with the British invasion of Havana that gave a major boost to the import of slaves and the sugar industry, and stops with the early years of the Revolution. However, Gott begins with the irruption of the Spanish adventurers in 1511, although he provides some sense of the shifting indigenous populations, Taínos, Guanahatabeyes and Siboneys, who made their way up from the mainland's Orinoco delta through the vast Caribbean archipelago in pre-Colombian times; and he brings the story of the Cuban revolution up to the present day, with an new Epilogue.
Gott is also more concerned to trace historical continuities: geographic and climatic determinants (including those `malignant forces which took the form of winds of awesome proportions' that the Taínos dubbed the huracán); piracy and corruption; social and racial strife; the pervasiveness of Africanity and the terrified white consciousness of neighbouring Haiti; all in the context of an overarching dependence on foreign empires, whether Spanish, British, American or Russian.
Born in 1783, midway between the US Declaration of Independence and the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789, Simón Bolívar's life and ideas were stamped--though asymmetrically--by both events. If the British could be driven out of North America by a people belonging to the same race and religion, why not the Spaniards in the South? The three hundred years of colonial rule that had followed the 1521 fall of Mexico were more than enough. And if the wisdom of the French Enlightenment had laid the foundations of the French Revolution, might it not serve the same purpose in Spanish America?
Travelling through Europe in the early 1800s, Bolívar would compare the decay and lethargy of the Madrid Court with the ferment of revolutionary Paris, albeit on the eve of Napoleon's coronation. Till the emperor's final defeat and the Restoration, Paris would remain qualitatively superior to Madrid and quantitatively ahead of Philadelphia.
And, of course, there was always sly, opportunist and expansionist London, which was not to be ignored. Despite the loss of its American colonies, it remained the hub of a strong and growing mercantilist Empire and its mastery of the seas was now unchallengeable. For that reason alone it had to be won over to the cause of South American independence and reminded of its own imperial interests in the continent.
Ever since Hector de Crèvecaeur posed the question, `What then is this American, this new man?' in 1782, North Americans have endlessly ruminated on their uniqueness. Yet they have rarely considered what they have in common with the `Other America', the sister-continent to their south. Such has been the ingrained Protestant provincialism and pietism of Anglo-American thinking that Spain's Atlantic Empire has too often been consigned to the shadows of the Black Legend, according to which the greed and depravities of the Old World were visited on the New by Iberian conquistadors and viceroys.
That same view is alive and flourishing since the national trauma of US post-9/11: the erosion of America's national identity by foreign immigration, and the undermining of its culture of Protestant individualism by Hispanic bilingualism; multiculturalism and the de-nationalization of elites and middle-class integration. `Fortress America' is today symbolized by the police-patrolled Iron Curtain erected on the US-Mexican border to exclude illegal Spanish-speaking, predominantly Catholic and poor, migrant immigrants wanting to survive after the slums and devastating slumps of their origins and share in the American Dream.
Very good and accurate view of Cuba. Sent several to relatives as gifts. Found it to have information that we hadn't known about the country's history.
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