lind-peinture
» » Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams (The Haymarket Series)

eBook Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams (The Haymarket Series) ePub

by Charles Rutheiser

eBook Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams (The Haymarket Series) ePub
Author: Charles Rutheiser
Language: English
ISBN: 1859848001
ISBN13: 978-1859848005
Publisher: Verso (June 1, 1997)
Pages: 334
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 416
Formats: lit docx doc mbr
ePub file: 1356 kb
Fb2 file: 1299 kb

Imagineering Atlanta book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Imagineering Atlanta book. Start by marking Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Charles Rutheiser has added an impressive new addition to the literature of urban anthropology. In this, his latest offering, he chronicles Atlanta's urban redevelopment for the 1996 Summer Olympics

Charles Rutheiser has added an impressive new addition to the literature of urban anthropology. In this, his latest offering, he chronicles Atlanta's urban redevelopment for the 1996 Summer Olympics. Like a hacksaw, Rutheiser sheers away at the Olympic hype, leaving only the truth of a "imagineered" Atlanta of the New South. As one who lived in Atlanta during the craziness of the Olympics, Rutheiser's observations are dead-on and leads the reader to view Atlanta as a "constructed" New Southern City. 7 people found this helpful.

In the age of decentralization, instant communications, and the subordination of locality to the demands of a globalizing market . They have become phantasmagorical landscapes

In the age of decentralization, instant communications, and the subordination of locality to the demands of a globalizing market, contemporary cities have taken on place-less or a-geographic characters. They have become phantasmagorical landscapes. Atlanta, argues Charles Rutheiser, is in many ways paradigmatic of this generic urbanism. As such, it provides a fertile ground for investigating the play of culture, power and place within a non-place urban realm. Rutheiser uses the mobilization for the 1996 Olympics to talk about the uneven development of Atlanta's landscape.

In the age of decentralization, instant communications, and the subordination of locality to the demands of a globalizing market, contemporary cities have taken on place-less or a-geographic characters.

Imagineering Atlanta. The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams (Haymarket Series). by Charles Rutheiser. Published April 1996 by Verso Books. Internet Archive Wishlist, Urban renewal, Stadscultuur, Ruimtelijke ordening, Aspect social, Economic conditions, Social conditions, City planning, Urbanisation, Economic history.

Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams. Over the last three decades, Atlanta has been one of the nation's leading metropolitan areas in terms of population growth and job creation. However, with the exception of a few elite enclaves, the. In the age of decentralization, instant communications, and the subordination of locality to the demands of a globalizing market, contemporary cities have taken on place-less or a-geographi. More). However, with the exception of a few elite enclaves, th.

Charles Rutheiser, Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams (New York: Verso, 1996), 22. 3. W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, with an Introduction by John Edgar Wideman (New York: Vintage Books/The Library of America, 1990), 59. 4. Clarence A. Bacote, The Story of Atlanta University: A Century of Service, 1865–1965 (Atlanta: Atlanta University, 1969), 66, 133–35, 139. 5. Thomas G. Dyer, Secret Yankees: The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999), 191. Tags: Annual Meeting.

Charles Rutheiser, Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Places in the City of Dreams (London: Verso, 1996), p. 28. oogle Scholar. 13. Helen Jefferson Lenskyj, Inside the Olympic Industry: Power, Politics and Activism (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2000). 14. Helen Jefferson Lenskyj, The Best Olympics Ever? Social Impacts of Sydney 2000(Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002).

Thomas Wheatley talks about the professional and the personal in his .

Thomas Wheatley talks about the professional and the personal in his Page-Turners interview with WABE's Denis O'Hayer. It’s a candid conversation. WABE’s Kate Sweeney produces this series. Broadcast version of story that aired Friday, July 12, 2013 Thomas Wheatley on Page-Turners: Extended version. Thomas Wheatley’s Picks. Imagineering Atlanta: The Politics of Place in the City of Dreams by Charles Rutheiser.

In the age of decentralization, instant communications, and the subordination of locality to the demands of a globalizing market, contemporary cities have taken on place-less or a-geographic characters. They have become phantasmagorical landscapes. Atlanta, argues Charles Rutheiser, is in many ways paradigmatic of this generic urbanism. As such, it provides a fertile ground for investigating the play of culture, power and place within a “non-place urban realm.” Rutheiser uses the mobilization for the 1996 Olympics to talk about the uneven development of Atlanta‘s landscape. Like other cities lacking any natural advantages, Atlanta‘s reputation and built form have been regularly reconfigured by generations of entrepreneurs, politicians, journalists and assorted visionaries to create a service-oriented information city of global reach. Borrowing a term from Walt Disney, Rutheiser refers to these successive waves of organized and systematic promotion as linked, but not always well-co-ordinated acts of urban “imagineering.” Focusing on the historic core of the metropolitan area, Rutheiser shows how Atlanta has long been both a test bed for federal urban renewal and a playground for private capital. The city provides an object lesson in internal colonization and urban underdevelopment. Yet, however illustrative of general trends, Atlanta also represents a unique conjunction of universals and particulars; it exemplifies a reality quite unlike either New York or Los Angeles—two cities to which it has often been compared. This book thus adds an important case study to the emerging discourse on contemporary urbanism. It goes beyond providing another account of uneven development and the “theme-parking” of a North American city: Rutheiser reflects on how contemporary American society thinks about cities, and argues that, ultimately, despite the ever-increasing virtualization of day-to-day life, the obliteration of locality is never complete. There always remains some “here,” if only deep beneath the “urbane disguises,” in the interstices of social activity, in the contradictions of experience and in the residues of individual and collective memory.
Peles
This book was written during the run-up to the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Written by a GSU professor it has an admittedly "Left" slant in its view.

It includes some history of the city, once again with a "left" slant. The best section (2nd half) covers the awarding of the 1996 games and then all of the political maneuvering which went on during the build up.

(p.s. I wish there was a follow-up since it ends before the games started)

Just moving to Atlanta in 2013, it is interesting to learn about its history and to get it from a different political view point.

Well worth a read
TheSuspect
Charles Rutheiser has added an impressive new addition to the literature of urban anthropology. In this, his latest offering, he chronicles Atlanta's urban redevelopment for the 1996 Summer Olympics. Like a hacksaw, Rutheiser sheers away at the Olympic hype, leaving only the truth of a "imagineered" Atlanta of the New South. As one who lived in Atlanta during the craziness of the Olympics, Rutheiser's observations are dead-on and leads the reader to view Atlanta as a "constructed" New Southern City.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only