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eBook The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism (American Radicals) ePub

by James J. Farrell

eBook The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism (American Radicals) ePub
Author: James J. Farrell
Language: English
ISBN: 0415913853
ISBN13: 978-0415913850
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (February 5, 1997)
Pages: 368
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 879
Formats: doc mbr lrf lrf
ePub file: 1272 kb
Fb2 file: 1722 kb

James Farrell has affirmed Sartre's concession with his new book on postwar radicalism. As with the French personalists, the dignity of the person remained at the core of radical action in the postwar United States.

James Farrell has affirmed Sartre's concession with his new book on postwar radicalism. According to Farrell, Personalism provided the common thread that wove through the crazy quilt of Sixties radicalism. Perhaps Farrell has gotten it right. These new radicals, according to Farrell, rejected the cult of liberal individualism and proposed that the person was created for community and each person had a moral responsibility for the other. The author notes that "communitarian spirituality was in fact the most distinctive aspect of Personalism.

After establishing its origins The Spirit of the Sixties explains how and why the personal became political when . These perspectives also persisted in American politics after the Sixties

After establishing its origins The Spirit of the Sixties explains how and why the personal became political when Sixties activists confronted the institutions of American postwar culture. The Spirit of the Sixties uses political personalism to explain how and why the personal became political when Sixties activists confronted the institutions of American postwar culture. These perspectives also persisted in American politics after the Sixties. Exploring the Sixties not just as history but as current affairs, Farrell revisits the perennial questions of human purpose and cultural practice contested in the decade.

While Farrell is correct that personalism played a major role in postwar radicalism, his .

While Farrell is correct that personalism played a major role in postwar radicalism, his concentration on personalism distorts the analysis. Because personalism applies most convincingly to Catholic Workers, one of the lesser movements of the sixties, Farrell ends up overemphasizing Catholic Workers in postwar history. More might be learned by structuring the analysis around the Civil Rights movement. He shows that this idea helped shape specific radical movements and, more important, limited their success.

Molecular Biology of the Cell: Problems Book. James J. Farrell is Professor of History, Director of American Studies and Boldt Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Humanities at St. Olaf College. Essential Cell Biology. The Biology of Cancer. Case Studies in Cancer. Janeway's Immunobiology. Case Studies in Immunology. The Molecules of Life. He is the author of Inventing the American Way of Death and The Nuclear Devil's Dictionary.

Farrell, James J. (1997). Farrell, James J. Related Online Resources. Discovering spirit in the sixties. Catholic Worker personalism. The beat of personalism. The spirit of the sixties : making postwar radicalism. The spirit of the sixties : making postwar radicalism, James J. Farrell Routledge ., . 1997. Australian/Harvard Citation. 1997, The spirit of the sixties : making postwar radicalism, James J. Civil rights personalism. Liberated personalism.

These perspectives also persisted in American politics after the Sixties. Of the many recent studies of social movements in the 1960s, James Farrell's is among the most insightful, original, and important. The Spirit of the Sixties is a moving and beautifully written analysis of ho. he personal became political. Farrell covers a lot of ground and covers it wel. - - Social Anarchism.

Spirit of the Sixties : Making of Postwar Radicalism. The book, thankfully, does admit that to a considerable extent even during the 1960s protest did turn away from personalism towards violent protest through the influence of such philosophies as existentialism that in most ways conflict with personalism. The big problem with "The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism" is the fact that it ignored the failures of personalism when it became applied to actual North American politics under Jimmy Carter and Pierre Trudeau in the seventies, and how this and the desire to comple.

Manufacturer: Routledge Release date: 3 April 1997 ISBN-10 : 0415913861 ISBN-13: 9780415913867. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/History Books‎. product description page. The Spirit of the Sixties - (American Radicals) by James J Farrell & J Farrell James (Paperback).

The Spirit of the Sixties explains how and why the personal became political when Sixties activists confronted the institutions of American postwar culture. The Spirit of the Sixties uses political personalism to explain how and why the personal became political when Sixties activists confronted the institutions of American postwar culture. After establishing its origins in the Catholic Worker movement, the Beat generation, the civil rights movement, and Ban-the-Bomb protests, James Farrell demonstrates the impact of personalism on Sixties radicalism. Students, antiwar activists and counterculturalists all used personalist perspectives in the "here and now revolution" of the decade. These perspectives also persisted in American politics after the Sixties. Exploring the Sixties not just as history but as current affairs, Farrell revisits the perennial questions of human purpose and cultural practice contested in the decade.
Kelerana
The 1960s has traditionally been seen by such commentators as Pat Buchanan as the time when the West as it has been traditionally understood moved away from traditional culture towards a completely new one which Benjamin Wiker traces to the first-century-BC philosopher Lucretius and where Man rather than God and natural law is the judge of whether a practice is right or wrong. Under this system nature was mechanistic rather than sacramental and interference was pleasure was the basis of the "good life".

In contrast, Robert Inchausti and Rod Dreher argue that the 1960s was not nearly so anti-Christian as popularly thought and that many of the important heroes and heroines of the early counterculture were in fact highly conservative in their political and cultural outlook. In "The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism", James J. Farrell looks at both perceptions of the 1960s counterculture and aims to relate all of them to a philosophy known as "personalism". According to Farrell, the basis of personalism was that people had an inviolable dignity that was not the same as the rights of individuals, and assumed that everyday values needed to be applied to politics for social problems such as racism and social injustice to be solved. Farrell traces the roots of this idea to Dorothy Day, the lesser-known Emmanuel Mounier, and Quaker activist and journalist A.J. Muste and shows how these writers impacted much more socially and culturally radical idealists during the beginnings of the counterculture of the 1960s and co-operated therewith in such magazines as "Liberation". The Beat Generation of Rexroth, Ginsberg, Kerouac and Snyder also developed a form of personalism that was, like Day's and Mounier's conservative Catholic activism, a form of philosophical anarcho-pacifism that considered expressive, subversive art to be a form of subversion.

"The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism" then explains how personalism influenced and infiltrated such key movements as African-American civil rights, the opposition to the Vietnam War, and the hippie counterculture. Farrell shows how the rebellion against the military-industrial complex of 1950s and 1960s was led by opposition to a mechanistic view of society and served to make personal life more political than it had ever been before, as shown by the way in which activists would spend their time protesting non-violently against the draft. The book, thankfully, does admit that to a considerable extent even during the 1960s protest did turn away from personalism towards violent protest through the influence of such philosophies as existentialism that in most ways conflict with personalism.

The big problem with "The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism" is the fact that it ignored the failures of personalism when it became applied to actual North American politics under Jimmy Carter and Pierre Trudeau in the seventies, and how this and the desire to completely subvert traditional morals in favour of total personal freedom led to an anti-personalist reaction not only in the form of free-market Reaganomics, but just as much culturally with the growth of musical groups like AC/DC and the Sex Pistols whose songs make strength the only right, and philosophers such as Peter Singer, whose support for euthanasing the disadvantaged harks back to the pre-personalist era. Yet the Reagan form of anti-personalism is barely discussed and the punk and "existentialist" reactions not at all. Feminism itself was often anti-personalist in tending to reduce everything to pure politics without focus on the person at all, yet this point is not taken seriously.

Instead, we get a rather half-hearted look and how personalism has had legacies beyond its 1960s/1970s peak, which is in many ways much less relevant to the historical significance of what Farrell is discussing.

All in all, "The Spirit of the Sixties: The Making of Postwar Radicalism" is a fascinating book about the evolution of the counterculture that relates all the key people and influences very well. Its only problem is that it fails to look at the other side of personalism, especially its failures when placed in the political arena during the 1970s, and the consequent reaction from punk and Reaganomics.
Wel
Of course there are many studies of the 1960s to choose from, and many are very good. The longer reviewer on this site who has provoked me by writing about how Farrell overplays certain things and underplays others is thoughtful. But pretty much every book on the 1960s does a version of this, and there are plenty of strands of the 1960s that floundered in the 1970s and 1980s, not just personalism. This particular book is especially virtuous because it plays up things that tend to be downplayed too much in the historiography. It is on my top ten list for the most under-appreciated historical books on the 1960s.
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