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eBook In the Floating Army: F. C. Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914 ePub

by Gregory R. Woirol

eBook In the Floating Army: F. C. Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914 ePub
Author: Gregory R. Woirol
Language: English
ISBN: 0252018001
ISBN13: 978-0252018008
Publisher: University of Illinois Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 1992)
Pages: 168
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 599
Formats: rtf txt mobi lrf
ePub file: 1345 kb
Fb2 file: 1298 kb

In the Floating Army book.

In the Floating Army book.

In the Floating Army: F. C. Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914. By Gregory R. Woirol. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1992. oceedings{Schneider1993InTF, title {In the Floating Army: F. 95, ISBN 0-252-01800-1. }, author {John C. Schneider}, year {1993} }. John C. Schneider.

In the Floating Army : F.

WOIROL, Gregory . OIROL, Gregory R. American, b. 1948. Publications: In the Floating Army: . Mills on Itinerant Labor in California, 1914, 1992; Technological Unemployment and Structural Unemployment Debates, 1996

WOIROL, Gregory . Career: Whittier College, Whittier, CA, instructor, 1976-80, assistant professor, 1980-83, associate professor, 1983-86, professor of economics, 1986-, department head, 1984-87, 1993, associate academic dean of liberal education, 1986-90. Mills on Itinerant Labor in California, 1914, 1992; Technological Unemployment and Structural Unemployment Debates, 1996. Contributor to periodicals.

Woirol excerpts from the journal of one . Mills, who in 1914 spent his summer living as a hobo in Central California

Woirol excerpts from the journal of one . Mills, who in 1914 spent his summer living as a hobo in Central California. This wasn't done to spy on people (indeed, he was recognized despite his ratty disguise) but to gather information on the lifestyle for the California Commission on Immigration and Housing. He undertook this job soon after riots broke out in Wheatland, so itinerant laborers were a subject of great interest and scrutiny. Mills worked as an orange packer in Lindsay and with lumber up in the mountains at Hume, and did other odd jobs in between. In the Floating Army: . Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914 (Urbana and Chicago, 1992), 97. Railroad companies counted 156,390 trespassers killed or injured between 1888 and 1905. If anything, official statistics probably underestimated the number of casualties. Higbie, Indispensable Outcasts, 52. 50. Perkins, Hayes, Here and There: An Itinerant Worker in the Pacific Northwest, 1898, Oregon Historical Quarterly 102 (2001): 363, 365. 51. London, The Road, 40. 52. Perkins, Here and There, 370–71 and 361.

Woirol, Gregory R. 1992. In the Floating Army, . Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914, Univ. The Other Half: The Autobiography of a Tramp, New York: Arden Book Company, 307 pages with illustrations. It traced its roots back to before there really was mechanized harvesting going on and today we sometimes use it about folks who catch on the fly (a moving train) w/little gear--they tend to roll up what personal gear they have in a blanket/sleeping bag like a burrito, tie off each end and then fashion a sling.

Download full text ebooks In the Floating Army: F. Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914 by Gregory R. Woirol, Gregory R. Woirol ePub. Childhood favourites.

In the Floating Army chronicles the awakening of social consciousness in a well-educated urban progressive and offers one of the most detailed . In the Floating Army : F.

In the Floating Army chronicles the awakening of social consciousness in a well-educated urban progressive and offers one of the most detailed personal accounts available of itinerant life in California just prior to the United States' entry into World War I.In May 1914, twenty-two-year-old Frederick C. Mills accepted his first job: a two-month mission, authorized by the California Corn mission on Immigration and Housing, to join the itinerant work force in central California and investigate hobo connections with the violent clashes involving the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Mills set out, self-consciously clad in rags, expecting adventure. What he experienced firsthand, however, appalled and angered him.Using Mills's daily journal and his reports to the commission, Gregory Woirol follows the young man's progress. To meet migrant workers and study their employers, Mills took jobs in the orange industry, in a Sierra lumber camp, and on a road-building crew. He slept in ramshackle sheds and fresh-cut haystacks, and he learned to hop a freight with his fellow travelers, despite the railroad guards' efforts to eject freeloaders.Throughout the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys, he shared meals and boxcars with bitter men forced by a recession to seek menial jobs far from home, footloose men driven by wanderlust to accept only short-term employment, con artists who filled their pockets by less strenuous means, and pathetic wretches endlessly in search of a drink.In the decade before World War I, large numbers of men took to the road, seeking employment whenever and wherever it was offered. California already depended heavily upon seasonal workers to pick citrus fruits and other crops, build roads, and lay railroad tracks. But farmers and businessmen were rarely grateful for this convenient source of labor. They expected seasonal employees to accept squalid housing, inadequate rations and sewage provisions, insulting treatment on the job, and the "bum's rush" out of town the moment work ended.Itinerant workers were shunned by the citizenry, cheated by employment agencies, and harassed by lawmen for loitering. This "floating army" of hungry, homeless men, assisted by IWW activists, protested these injustices both peaceably and violently.Mills spent several days conversing with IWW members, and he concluded "I have seen, to a very limited degree, some of the workings of the inner circle, the brains of this great army, the organizing force that is trying to tell this army of its strength, trying to teach them how to get their share of the goods of this world. And the message they bring, the message millions of men are listening to, is one of violence, bloodshed, 'Direct Action' they call it."
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