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eBook A Separate Civil War: Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era) ePub

by Jonathan Dean Sarris

eBook A Separate Civil War: Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era) ePub
Author: Jonathan Dean Sarris
Language: English
ISBN: 081392555X
ISBN13: 978-0813925554
Publisher: University of Virginia Press; First Thus edition (August 3, 2006)
Pages: 256
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 292
Formats: docx doc rtf mbr
ePub file: 1534 kb
Fb2 file: 1203 kb

For some time now, scholars of Appalachia's Civil War have looked forward to Jonathan Dean Sarris's book on Civil War era .

For some time now, scholars of Appalachia's Civil War have looked forward to Jonathan Dean Sarris's book on Civil War era North Georgia. It fulfills its promise, making a substantial contribution to both Appalachian studies and the broader field of the Civil War. Most Americans think of the Civil War as a series of dramatic clashes between massive armies led by romantic-seeming leaders. But in the Appalachian communities of North Georgia, things were very different.

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A Separate Civil War: Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South is a 2006 book by Jonathan Dean Sarris that examines the internal conflicts during the American Civil War between Lumpkin and Fannin county in Georgia. Within the book, Sarris explores the factions of Unionist and Confederate sympathizers that were present from 1861 to 1865. Sarris' focus is to examine "the wartime experiences of Fannin and Lumpkin counties, located in the southern spur of the Blue Ridge Mountains

A Separate Civil War: Co. .has been added to your Cart. Those questions are addressed by Jonathan Dean Sarris in his richly sourced and tightly-argued examination of the Civil War in two northern Georgia counties.

A Separate Civil War: Co.

A Separate Civil War book.

Series: A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Er.

Published by: University of Virginia Press. The book reveals that, for many participants, this war was fought less for abstract ideological causes than for reasons tied to home, family, friends, and community.

The brutal civil war in the mountains, writes Sarris, "resulted from a.

The brutal civil war in the mountains, writes Sarris, "resulted from a dramatic social disruption" (p. 184). One of the important contributions of this work is that it follows the themes of some recent Civil War histories in delving into the motives that made soldiers choose sides and fight. Thus, as the rest of the nation embraced peace after 1865, a civil war of words and deeds continued in North Georgia's mountain counties as ex-Tories and ex-Confederates continued to defend their communities, families, past actions, and reputations.

A Separate Civil War : Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South. Part of the A Nation Divided: New Studies in Civil War History Series). by Jonathan Dean Sarris.

A Separate Civil War. Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South. Jonathan Dean Sarris. Reconstructing the Campus.

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in . The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery. Lumpkin County is a county located in the north central portion of the . As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,966. Its county seat is Dahlonega. Fannin County is a county located in the north central portion of the .

Most Americans think of the Civil War as a series of dramatic clashes between massive armies led by romantic-seeming leaders. But in the Appalachian communities of North Georgia, things were very different. Focusing on Fannin and Lumpkin counties in the Blue Ridge Mountains along Georgia’s northern border, A Separate Civil War: Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South argues for a more localized, idiosyncratic understanding of this momentous period in our nation’s history. The book reveals that, for many participants, this war was fought less for abstract ideological causes than for reasons tied to home, family, friends, and community.

Making use of a large trove of letters, diaries, interviews, government documents, and sociological data, Jonathan Dean Sarris brings to life a previously obscured version of our nation’s most divisive and destructive war. From the outset, the prospect of secession and war divided Georgia’s mountain communities along the lines of race and religion, and war itself only heightened these tensions. As the Confederate government began to draft men into the army and seize supplies from farmers, many mountaineers became more disaffected still. They banded together in armed squads, fighting off Confederate soldiers, state militia, and their own pro-Confederate neighbors. A local civil war ensued, with each side seeing the other as a threat to law, order, and community itself. In this very personal conflict, both factions came to dehumanize their enemies and use methods that shocked even seasoned soldiers with their savagery. But when the war was over in 1865, each faction sought to sanitize the past and integrate its stories into the national myths later popularized about the Civil War. By arguing that the reason for choosing sides had more to do with local concerns than with competing ideologies or social or political visions, Sarris adds a much-needed complication to the question of why men fought in the Civil War.

Datrim
It is common to paint the entire south during the Civil War with the same brush. In reality, the Confederate States of America consisted of widely diverse populations. The internal conflict within north Georgia during the Civil War is described in excellent detail in A Separate Civil War. It also explains the reason for many north Georgia families moving to the frontiers of western expansion such as west Texas, Oregon, and California soon after the war.
Feri
I grew up in Fannin Co., Ga. I have often wondered about that area during the civil war era. This book is a great source of information for, not only Fannin Co., but Lumpkin Co. as well. Very descriptive and well researched. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for that area during this tumultous period.
Dugor
This book was a required reading for two of my graduate classes at the University of North Georgia. It was a good choice in showing the inner parts of the war and the area that has not been displayed in truth. Some parts tend to repeat and scattered at times, but work that had not been written, this is great research.
Dreladred
Great look at the north Georgia region. Many events mirror the stories told to me by my Grandparents. I understand so much more about my own family's travails during that awful time. Thank you.
Browelali
Depicts the Civil War and the North Georgia Mountains, the divisions in unity, and is right on about the politics of the mountains.
fr0mTheSkY
Historians still debate the role of Confederate collapse to the Civil War's outcome. What was the South fighting for and did that will falter, fatally weakening the Confederacy? Those questions are addressed by Jonathan Dean Sarris in his richly sourced and tightly-argued examination of the Civil War in two northern Georgia counties. This local study suggests that James McPherson and Gary Gallagher's assessment of Southern motivations may be too simple. Cause and comrade (McPherson) or strong nationalism in support of an independent slave-holding republic (Gallagher) does not fully consider how local interests shaped Southern will.(1) In Sarris's account, nationalism got mugged by conscription and its devastating effect on the economy of Fannin and Lumpkin counties and their people.

The 1864 guerilla war between pro-Confederate and anti-Confederate forces in northern Georgia has often been explained as a demonstration of Union sentiment among mountain men with weak ties to slavery, but Sarris patiently dismantles that view. It was true that the Confederacy was concerned about the loyalty of north Georgia; Lumpkin County had voted for Constitutional Union candidate John Bell and both voted for anti-secession convention candidates. Sarris argues this should not be interpreted as Union support, but as support for conditional secession. In 1861, both counties were aware of doubts about their commitment to the Confederacy. When war came, they demonstrated their commitment to white supremacy, hatred of abolitionists, and support for a regional Southern identity with massive enlistments.

However, 1862 the pinch of conscription created shifting loyalties. A Tory opposition developed that included men who had escaped the draft, those who had been victimized by the national government, and those who had deserted from its armies. To probe their motivations, Sarris uses postwar depositions of the federal government's Southern Claims Commissions. Despite the post-war incentive to proclaim Union sentiment, Sarris finds that desertion, draft evasion and resistance could be better explained by community and family concerns, as well as grievances about local justice. Lumpkin and Fannin Counties were not Unionist highlanders; they were disillusioned Southerners whose localism overwhelmed Confederate nationalism.

One of the highlights of Sarris's account is a chilling chapter about the 1864 guerilla warfare--"Hellish Deeds in a Christian Land." In a region largely untouched by Union military, Tory and Rebels fought. He describes a world of roving bands of outlaws, militia, regulars, and vigilantes, who engaged in organized and random killing that ranged from warfare to blood feud to criminality. Civil institutions were strained and broken and the population was destitute.

It is possible that Sarris overestimates north Georgia's initial commitment to Confederate nationalism, as conscription did not result in guerilla war everywhere, and proximity of the Union army was a minor factor in the unrest. Nevertheless, he is convincing that pro-Union sentiment was not a significant factor, which supports his larger argument of the primacy of localism over nationalism. These two counties are probably not typical, and Sarris wisely argues that he is adding complexity to previous interpretation rather than overturning it. It is a well-executed work of accessible scholarship.

Eric Gubelman
University of Tennessee
PhD student
October 2012

1. James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997); Gary W. Gallagher, The Confederate War (Harvard University Press, 1999).
Xwnaydan
The popular view of the civil war has been presented by biased historians with an interpretation that elevates leaders as gods. The other part of the story is the homes and families whose lives are changed as they live through the horrors of war. For some reason the other story has been revealed too little such as Trotter's book "Bushwhackers" and now Sarris.

I do not include "Cold Mountain" which is poor fiction and connects badly with historical accuracy except where it steals from previous work.
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