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eBook Roark Masters without Slaves (Cloth) ePub

by James L. Roark

eBook Roark Masters without Slaves (Cloth) ePub
Author: James L. Roark
Language: English
ISBN: 0393055620
ISBN13: 978-0393055627
Publisher: WW Norton & Co; 1st edition (April 1, 1977)
Pages: 285
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 253
Formats: lrf mbr lit doc
ePub file: 1715 kb
Fb2 file: 1748 kb

James L. Roark's "Masters without Slaves" is a well-written and solidly-grounded academic study of the ideological and cultural bases of slavery and their transition into the ethos of white supremacy that flourishes in many parts of America to this day. Roark relied heavily on first-hand.

Masters without Slaves book. James L. Roark's Masters without Slaves is a well-written and solidly-grounded academic study of the ideological and cultural foundations of slavery and their transition into the ethos of white supremacy that still flourishes in America today.

Home Browse Books Book details, Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the. Publication year: 1977. Contributors: James L. Roark. Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Subjects: Plantation Life-Southern States.

Roark, James L. Publication date. history, 1865-1877), Plantation life - Southern States, Slavery - Southern States, Southern States - Social conditions. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 7, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Masters without Slaves Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction by James L. Roark 9780393009019 (Paperback, 1978) Delivery Australian shipping is usually within 10 to 14 working days. See all 4 brand new listings. Masters without Slaves by James L. Roark (Paperback, 1978). Brand new: lowest price.

Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Winner of the Allan Nevins Award of the Society of American Historians. In 1865, the Confederacy passed into history, but its ideological cornerstone survived. War had ended slavery, but war had not ended Southern planters' attachment to it. This is a history of that moment when planters became masters without slaves.

Born a slave, his experience spans the history of the South from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. Roark is professor of history at Emory University. When nearly all free blacks were destitute, Ellison was wealthy and well-established. He owned a large plantation and more slaves than all but the richest white planters.

PP xii, 273. Duncan Macleod (a1). PP xii, 273.

University James L Roark. Book Format: Choose an option.

Winner of the Allan Nevins Award of the Society of American Historians.

In 1865, the Confederacy passed into history, but its ideological cornerstone survived. War had ended slavery, but war had not ended Southern planters' attachment to it. This is a history of that moment when planters became masters without slaves.
Eayaroler
As a long time amateur student of the Civil War, having visited at least once all major battlefields and read a great many CW books since 1957 when my interest began. I have been searching to expand my reading to Reconstruction and beyond in the Olde Confederacy. This book filled my desire.
Far from the romantic version of post Civil War South as in Gone With The Wind, the author has researched and compiled actual data as well as stories of how former masters coped with the loss of their slaves. Few handled the situation well, they had no training on how to operate a business in a free labor market. Some fled the South to other parts of America or Europe. Some fled to countries where they could legally buy slaves at that time, some committed suicide.
Planters lost sons to the battlefield as the Grim Reaper harvested from all social classes. Planters lost crops, lost farms, lost the market. It was a very heavy price to pay for their attempt to keep slavery intact. In this book you will feel their despair and anguish.
Gerceytone
This book is very interesting, a much overlooked aspect of the end of the War and its legacy. What to do with freed slaves, since the federal government who freed them would not care for them. It is how Southerners coped with the problem in the immediate years after the War and reconstruction. Came on time in good condition.
Thordigda
To one degree or another, the slaveholders shared rule in the USA with the commercial capitalists until they were defeated in the Civil War. This book discusses their ideological and economic transformation at the end of the civil war and the beginning of Reconstruction.

They believed that slavery was absolutely necessary to govern African Americans and to produce cotton and the other crops that underlied their wealth. They believed in the inferiority of African Americans and had no taste for free or freed labor. As a class they were destroyed. Many left the United States for Brazil and Cuba where African slavery still persisted. Others retreated into middle class and working class occupations, bereft of their former power. A significant minority adjusted to the new order and attempted to recast Southern agriculture on a basis that was formally free labor, but sought to achieve the same power as slavery.

What comes through in this book was that the fundamental problem of Southern agriculture under American capitalism until mechaniziation came after World War II was labor shortage and the demands of first the slave owners and later the capitalist plantation owners to keep the workers and farmers who tilled the land, Black and white, from reaping the wealth. By the end of the 19th century, when most of the former slave owners had either been eliminated or amalgamated with North Industrial capital, the "New South" arose with Jim Crow violence, apartheid, and denial of democracy, the create a permanent Black labor force for Southern Agriculture without the rights and power of free men.
heart of sky
A masterpiece of perceptive analysis and eye-opening descriptions of planters, slave life and their relationship and ultimately their destruction. A very objective view. You almost feel sad for the disintegrating planter class but only for a moment.
Deorro
James L. Roark's "Masters without Slaves" is a well-written and solidly-grounded academic study of the ideological and cultural bases of slavery and their transition into the ethos of white supremacy that flourishes in many parts of America to this day. Roark relied heavily on first-hand accounts – letters, diaries, and notebooks – augmented by scholarly works from distinguished historians such as Willie Lee Rose, Charles Roland, Kenneth Stampp, and Eugene Genovese. As the back cover blurb stated, his intention was to “capture reality as the planters knew it.” He succeeded so well he earned the 1974 Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians.

"Masters without Slaves" reinforces the argument that the American Revolution was not revolutionary. It was simply a war for independence. The true American revolution was fought between 1861-1865. This upheaval overturned the political, economic, social, and racial status quo throughout much of the nation – and nowhere more so than in the plantation south. Much of American history since 1861, and certainly our domestic politics, has been dedicated to dealing with the still-unresolved repercussions of the 1861-65 revolution. Roark nudged us along a little more toward understanding where we are now and how we arrived here.

"Masters without Slaves" earned Four Stars from me.
Ramsey`s
I found this at my library, hard to believe I'd never seen it before as I began studying the civil war in the 70s when the book was new.

Mr. Roark gives us the numerous first-person accounts telling how it felt 'on the ground' during the runup to the war, the war itself and then the aftermath. The 1860 US Census lists some 43,000 plantations in the soon-to-be Confederate States. About a third of them were occupied and more or less destroyed by either or both armies. About another third never recovered from the war and were broken up and sold or abandoned. The remaining third had to learn how to cope with free labor while free blacks had to learn how to labor for wages.

This last is the essence of the book although it occupies only a chapter, really. All along I was saying to myself, "mechanize!" Between 1865 and 1875 much new agricultural machinery was developed but not in the south. Their traditional dependence on human labor atrophied their inventiveness, seemingly. The result was the apartheid system of oppression we all know: they needed the labor so needed the political and social control which provided it, cheap.

It all came together to retard progress in that section for a century or more. Mr. Roark takes this large-scale picture and turns it into human drama by using the diaries and letters written by the participants. Bravo!
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