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eBook The Last Battle of the Civil War: Palmetto Ranch (Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Series, No. 4) ePub

by Jeffrey W. Hunt

eBook The Last Battle of the Civil War: Palmetto Ranch (Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Series, No. 4) ePub
Author: Jeffrey W. Hunt
Language: English
ISBN: 0292734611
ISBN13: 978-0292734616
Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1 edition (August 15, 2002)
Pages: 233
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 250
Formats: rtf lrf lit docx
ePub file: 1813 kb
Fb2 file: 1802 kb

Series: Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Series (Book 4). Paperback: 233 pages. Read this for our Civil War book club.

Series: Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Series (Book 4). Since it was little more than a skirmish involving only two regiments on the union side and about 700 southern cavalry, one gets a unique view of unit level tactics and capabilities often lacking in the larger engagements.

Part of the Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Series). On May 12-13, the last battle of the Civil War had been fought at the southernmost tip of Texas-resulting in a Confederate victory.

Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage). by. Jeffrey W. Hunt

Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage). Although Palmetto Ranch did nothing to change the war's outcome, it added the fi More than two months after Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, the New York Times reported a most surprising piece of news.

On May 12-13, the last battle of the Civil War had been fought at the southernmost tip of Texas-resulting in a Confederate victory. Although Palmetto Ranch did nothing to change the war's outcome, it added the final irony to a conflict replete with ironies, unexpected successes, and lost opportunities.

Series: Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Endowment, Number .

Series: Clifton and Shirley Caldwell Texas Heritage Endowment, Number Four. This is a print-on-demand title.

Hunt, Jeffrey Wm. The Last Battle of the Civil War: Palmetto Ranch. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2002. Battle of Palmetto Ranch: American Civil War's Final Battle. ISBN 978-0-292-73461-6. Originally published by Civil War Times magazine as "Last Hurrah at Palmetto Ranch", January 2006 (Vol. XLIV, No. 6). Published Online: June 12, 2006. Retrieved from Historynet. com on January 20, 2014.

Redirected from Battle of Palmetto Ranch). The Battle of Palmito Ranch is considered by some criteria as the final battle of the American Civil War. It was fought May 12 and 13, 1865, on the banks of the Rio Grande east of Brownsville, Texas and a few miles from the seaport of Los Brazos de Santiago. Since the Confederacy had ceased to exist, it is also argued that this battle should be classified as a postwar action.

In particular, he reveals that the Texans were fully aware of events in the East-and still willing to fight for Southern independence

The Battle of Palmito Ranch, also known as the Battle of Palmito Hill and the Battle of Palmetto Ranch, was fought on May 12 – May 13, 1865, during the American Civil War. It was the last major clash of arms in the war. The battle was fought on the . .

The Battle of Palmito Ranch, also known as the Battle of Palmito Hill and the Battle of Palmetto Ranch, was fought on May 12 – May 13, 1865, during the American Civil War. The battle was fought on the banks of the Rio Grande about twelve miles east of Brownsville, Texas. In the kaleidoscope of events following the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army on April 9, Palmito Ranch was nearly ignored. Books related to The Last Battle of the Civil War. Skip this list.

More than two months after Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, the New York Times reported a most surprising piece of news. On May 12-13, the last battle of the Civil War had been fought at the southernmost tip of Texas—resulting in a Confederate victory. Although Palmetto Ranch did nothing to change the war's outcome, it added the final irony to a conflict replete with ironies, unexpected successes, and lost opportunities. For these reasons, it has become both one of the most forgotten and most mythologized battles of the Civil War.

In this book, Jeffrey Hunt draws on previously unstudied letters and court martial records to offer a full and accurate account of the battle of Palmetto Ranch. As he recreates the events of the fighting that pitted the United States' 62nd Colored Troops and the 34th Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry against Texas cavalry and artillery battalions commanded by Colonel John S. "Rip" Ford, Hunt lays to rest many misconceptions about the battle. In particular, he reveals that the Texans were fully aware of events in the East—and still willing to fight for Southern independence. He also demonstrates that, far from fleeing the battle in a panic as some have asserted, the African American troops played a vital role in preventing the Union defeat from becoming a rout.

watching to future
Read this for our Civil War book club. Detailed account of a minor engagement that took place after surrender of all the southern armies. Since it was little more than a skirmish involving only two regiments on the union side and about 700 southern cavalry, one gets a unique view of unit level tactics and capabilities often lacking in the larger engagements. Detailed coverage of the court martial that followed the fight, arising from the blame game arising from the union defeat. The US 62nd Colored Regiment comes off as the best unit and the entire battle need never have been fought as the commanding officer had no goal or reason for advancing on Brownsville in the first place and had no goal or plan once contact was made. The writing is a bit brittle here and there, but every sad event is fully documented and footnoted. An interesting side note for any Civil war buff.
Jothris
I had not head of this battle but accidentally came upon it at the Texas Civil War Museum in Ft Worth. Being from Texas I am especially proud to hear that Tx fought the final battle and won!
Legend 33
Great book on the last battle of the Civil War. Well researched and well written.
Bajinn
Well researched, well analyzed, good narrated. The best book about this little known episode of the WBTS, the closing one.
Bremar
I bought this book for my Dad and he loved it! He said he had trouble putting it down. This is a great buy for a person who enjoys reading about Texas battles & history whether accurate or inaccurate.
Cordanius
it was only okay the book was in good shape but there were special markers taped on favorite pages.; and these markers were never mentioned...
BoberMod
Don't be fooled by the sophomoric cover art. This is an excellent, well-written, account of a well-known but little understood engagement. The bulk of the book is a very detailed, but readable, tactical description of the "battle," supported by a series of servicable maps. The book helps answer the question: "Why do people want to fight when it's all over?" It's a good story, well told, with commendable analysis of command decisions and options.
This account (of a battle that everyone's heard of but nobody knows much about) drags a bit in its beginning and ending sections, but its middle(the actual description of the battle) is a well-paced, crystal-clear description of the battle action of both sides. Good depiction of how individual leaders and their strengths and weaknesses influence military actions. The attempts to place the battle in a much larger historical context sometimes were a stretch, but the book overall is a great read for Civil War history buffs.
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