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eBook Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePub

by J. E. Lendon

eBook Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePub
Author: J. E. Lendon
Language: English
ISBN: 0465015069
ISBN13: 978-0465015061
Publisher: Basic Books; 1 edition (November 2, 2010)
Pages: 576
Category: Ancient Civilizations
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 932
Formats: lrf mbr lrf mobi
ePub file: 1447 kb
Fb2 file: 1280 kb

Song of Wrath tells the story of Classical Athens' victorious Ten Years' War (431– 421 BC) against grim Sparta-the first decade of the terrible Peloponnesian War that turned the Golden Age of Greece to lead.

Song of Wrath tells the story of Classical Athens' victorious Ten Years' War (431– 421 BC) against grim Sparta-the first decade of the terrible Peloponnesian War that turned the Golden Age of Greece to lead. Lendon presents a sweeping tale of pitched battles by land and sea, sieges, sacks, raids, and deeds of cruelty and guile-along with courageous acts of mercy, surprising charity, austere restraint, and arrogant resistance.

Song of Wrath is the latest book to show the value of a great story, told with skill by a talented historian and gifted .

Song of Wrath is the latest book to show the value of a great story, told with skill by a talented historian and gifted writer armed with a powerful idea. It is learned, readable, and passionate. Lendon takes an anthropological approach to the first ten years of the Peloponnesian War. Thucydides, the war's great chronicler, is often read as a guide to the kind of thinking we call "realist," in which relations between states are entirely determined by power and the fear of power.

In Song of Wrath, . Lendon discusses not simply how the Athenians and Spartans fought, but how they thought. This book demonstrates that a good story can also be good history.

Song of Wrath is the first work of Ancient Greek history for the post-cold-war generation.

The Peloponnesian War is fascinating and the city states are diverse interesting actors that can't help fall prey to their own histories, mythology, and need to defend a sense of honor.

Follow New Books in History to never miss another show. Helen Glew, Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation: Women’s Work in the Civil Service and the London Countadded 2 years ago. Reading J. E. Lendon& writerly Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins (Basic Books, 2010) took me back to the eventful days of my youth at Price Elementary School, or rather to the large yardon which we had recess.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins .

Lendon is professor of history at the University of Virginia and author of Soldiers and Ghosts: A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity, runner-up for the Longman History Today Book of the Year Prize (2006). Country of Publication.

Song of Wrath tells the story of Classical Athens' victorious Ten Years' War (431– 421 BC) against grim Sparta—the first decade of the terrible Peloponnesian War that turned the Golden Age of Greece to lead. Historian J.E. Lendon presents a sweeping tale of pitched battles by land and sea, sieges, sacks, raids, and deeds of cruelty and guile—along with courageous acts of mercy, surprising charity, austere restraint, and arrogant resistance. Recounting the rise of democratic Athens to great-power status, and the resulting fury of authoritarian Sparta, Greece's traditional leader, Lendon portrays the causes and strategy of the war as a duel over national honor, a series of acts of revenge. A story of new pride challenging old, Song of Wrath is the first work of Ancient Greek history for the post-cold-war generation.
Dalarin
I am a firm convert to Professor Lendon's premise about the Peloponnesian War: that it can be understood far better as a war of honor and status, with it's inherent tit-for-tat dynamics. Equally so the "First Peloponnesian War", which he deals with in detail. As an experienced war-gamer of the conflict, I can really appreciate the brilliance of his perspective. Superb stuff!!
Goltigor
Professor Lendon's book on the first ten years of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta is beautifully written and carefully and convincingly argued. I recommend it without reservation.

His hypothesis, that the war was fought not, as Thucydides would have it, because of Sparta's fear of Athens' growing power, but rather over rank, i.e. how the Greeks at large were to perceive the relative standing of the combatants, seems to have great explanatory power, but I'm unqualified to judge its merits. What I can say is that, taken only as a work of narrative history for the general reader, the book is a great success. That it is also a treatise dealing with issues of interest to scholars, and that those parts of the book were at least as interesting to this non-scholar as the narrative of the war, is greatly to Prof. Lendon's credit. One need not be a classicist to follow and appreciate the argument.

I found the style delightful. It is a bit formal, rich with ironies and vivid descriptions, always clear and compelling. An almost random sample gives the flavor. Speaking of an Athenian general who lost his life in Ionia, Prof. Lendon says: "Lysicles' sojourn in Hades under the reproachful glare of Pericles (he had taken up with Pericles' mistress after the latter's death) may have been lightened by better news from other felled Athenians who would stagger off Charon's boat in years to come ...."

The author and the publisher deserve great praise for the form of the book. The accompanying apparatus--glossaries of people, places, and things, chronologies, discussion of sources, suggestions for further readings, etc.--is exemplary.

Maps are profuse. Almost every account of an event is within a few pages, at most, of a relevant map. Often the maps overlap, but only to reflect a shift in the theatre of operations of the combatants. This is the most user-friendly approach I've seen, far better than in those books where maps are segregated far from the accompanying text, and/or limited in quantity to the bare minimum. (It's true, as another reviewer points out, that some of the maps are in an old-fashioned style that may be a little harder to read than those in a more contemporary style. On the other hand, these older maps show topography more clearly than many of the minimalist modern exemplars.)

Frequent illustrations are also placed in close proximity to the relevant text. The endnotes are keyed to paragraphs rather than sentences, eliminating a great deal of flipping back and forth, for those who care. (But what ever happened to footnotes?) The type size is friendly for those like me with aging eyes.

In sum, this book is a complete success in both form and content, deserving the highest recommendation: I would have given it six stars if that were allowed.
Gogul
In Song of Wrath J.E. Lendon takes an anthropological approach to the first ten years of the Peloponnesian War. Thucydides, the war's great chronicler, is often read as a guide to the kind of thinking we call "realist," in which relations between states are entirely determined by power and the fear of power. But such an account leaves many things that happened in the war without explanation. Lendon shows that considering the war as an expression of ancient Greek culture explains most of them, and I found his interpretation completely convincing. Only by seeing the war as the ancient Greeks saw it can we understand why they did what they did. Song of Wrath is also beautifully written, in a strong and original style. Lendon is a superb storyteller and he makes us feel the excitement of the war's dramatic events - saboteurs waiting tensely in the dark for the signal to strike, hoplites watching nervously as opposing armies approach, sailors struggling to control their sleek triremes in seas as dangerous as the rams of enemy ships. In Lendon's hands the lulls between the battles are equally exciting, since he fills them with marvelous details of Greek history, religion, and historical geography. Song of Wrath is both entertaining and enlightening at a very high level.
Haal
Okay you ancient Greeks freaks, we have a new star! J.E. Lendon's Song of Wrath is simply excellent! I've read 'em all: Kagan, Hanson, Cartledge, Holland, ancient, old and new authors; anything and everything about ancient Greece, I've read it! I can say, without reservation, that Lendon is one of our top historians on things ancient in the Roman and Greek worlds. He is as thoughtful as any author, doesn't drag on with some topics (think Hanson here), isn't over the top with his story telling (wink, wink, Mr. Holland), but combines beautiful story-telling with a deep understanding of his topic. You may not fully agree with his arguments (I personally think that he places way too much emphasis on the the idea of "rank" as to why the war of Spartan aggression dragged on for so long), but his arguments are well worth serious consideration. Read this book!!!!
skyjettttt
Not only is Song of Wrath well written, but it explains the WHY behind the Peloponnesian War, not just the where, what and how. I've never come across a book that's successfully made sense of all the unusual events of the conflict between Athens and Sparta like this. J.E. Lendon is one of my new favorite authors on Ancient Greece!
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