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eBook The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm ePub

by Juliet Nicolson

eBook The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm ePub
Author: Juliet Nicolson
Language: English
ISBN: 0802118461
ISBN13: 978-0802118462
Publisher: Grove Press (May 10, 2007)
Pages: 304
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 965
Formats: txt mobi rtf mbr
ePub file: 1416 kb
Fb2 file: 1135 kb

The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer a century ago, when the world was . Juliet Nicolson transports us back to the enchanted and enchanting summer of 1911. She guides us through its four months in company with some of the most delightful people imaginable.

The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer a century ago, when the world was on the cusp of irrevocable change. Through the tight lens of four months. It is a wonderful and poignant tour that proved to be a farewell appearance to their world.

Social classes, Social structure. New York : Grove Press : Distributed by Publishers Group West. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger7 on September 27, 2011.

England 1911, Just Before the Storm. Yet there were unmistakable signs of perfection overreaching itself, as the rumble of thunder and several dramatic storms interrupted the sunny constancy of those months

England 1911, Just Before the Storm. Yet there were unmistakable signs of perfection overreaching itself, as the rumble of thunder and several dramatic storms interrupted the sunny constancy of those months.

Juliet Nicolson is the author of "The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before . She is the granddaughter of Vita Sackville-West and the daughter of Nigel Nicolson. She has two daughters, and lives with her husband in Sussex.

Juliet Nicolson is the author of "The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm "and "The Great Silence: Britain From the Shadow of the First World War to the Dawn of the Jazz Age". She read English at the University of Oxford and has worked in publishing in both the UK and the United States.

All of them were caught up that season in a prolonged and oppressive heat wave that only the cheetahs in the Regent’s Park zoo found delightful

The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer a century ago, when . The Perfect Summer is the story of the summer months of 1911, a year which in retrospect for England was indeed the calm before the storm of World War I. Because 1911 was a Coronation Year much of The Perfect Summer focusses on the lives and doings of England's upper classes, from King George V and Queen Mary through Society luminaries like. the Marchioness of Ripon and politicians like Winston Churchill.

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The Perfect Summer book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm. The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer just over a century ago, when the world was on the cusp of irrevocable change. A sparkling social history that brings the twilight of the Edwardian era to life (Entertainment Weekly). That summer of 1911, a new king was crowned and the aristocracy was at play, bounding from one house party to the next. But perfection was not for all. Cracks in the social fabric were showing.

Author:Nicolson, Juliet. We appreciate the impact a good book can have

Author:Nicolson, Juliet. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm by Juliet Nicolson (Hardback, 2007). Pre-owned: lowest price.

The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer a century ago when the world was on the cusp of irrevocable change. Through the tight lens of four months, Juliet Nicolson’s rich storytelling gifts rivet us with the sights, colors, and feelings of a bygone era. That summer of 1911 a new king was crowned and the aristocracy was at play, bounding from one house party to the next. But perfection was not for all. Cracks in the social fabric were showing. The country was brought to a standstill by industrial strikes. Temperatures rose steadily to more than 100 degrees; by August deaths from heatstroke were too many for newspapers to report. Drawing on material from intimate and rarely seen sources and narrated through the eyes of a series of exceptional individuals — among them a debutante, a choirboy, a politician, a trade unionist, a butler, and the Queen — The Perfect Summer is a vividly rendered glimpse of the twilight of the Edwardian era.
Levaq
Juliet Nicolson is following in the footsteps of her father Nigel and her grandparents Harold and Vita (Sackville-West) Nicolson by producing history which reads like fine literature. The Perfect Summer is the story of the summer months of 1911, a year which in retrospect for England was indeed the calm before the storm of World War I.

Because 1911 was a Coronation Year much of The Perfect Summer focusses on the lives and doings of England's upper classes, from King George V and Queen Mary through Society luminaries like the Marchioness of Ripon and politicians like Winston Churchill. There is more to The Perfect Summer than gossip about the elite, however. The summer months of 1911 were filled with tension as the Liberal Government struggled to reform the House of Lords, the British and Germans clashed in Morocco, and strikes spread across the country. In addition, most of the summer was brutally hot and dry. All of this is well and thoroughly discussed with plenty of references from newspapers and magazines of the period to add immediacy.

The Perfect Summer will join Barbara Tuchman's The Proud Tower as an essential resource to help us better understand the world which came to an end forever just three summers later.
Winawel
I thoroughly enjoyed "The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just before the Storm." I'm not exactly sure why I bought it, but once in hand I found it to be a delicious snapshot of life at a time that could best be described as the end of innocence for western Europeans and, to a lesser extent, those of us in the United States. Juliet Nicolson looks at these summers months -- notable at the time mainly because of the atypical hot, sunny weather -- from a variety of perspectives: Queen Mary, the daughter of a duke making her debut in society, Winston Churchill, several artists and writers, as well as more common folks including a butler and a young boy.

It's all an interesting slice of life taken at a point where nothing hugely earth-shattering is going on, but World War I is lurking just around the corner, along with the huge societal changes it would bring. If there's one area where I thought the author could have done a bit better was addressing the labor issues -- and the working people -- that played an important role in the news that summer. On the other hand, I greatly appreciated that she included an epilogue to let readers know what happened with the main "characters" through the war and afterwards.

I'm looking forward to reading Ms. Nicolson's book on the years immediate after World War I in the near future.
Eigonn
I love a history book that reads like a novel. Each month of 1911 England is described with interesting tidbits of information about how people of every social class lived. I am a big fan of books about the history of unions, and thoroughly enjoyed reading about how factory workers, especially women, organized and improved deplorable working conditions. I could not put this book down. One thing I did not care for was a Kindle technical difficulty: when excerpts of poems appear, they are in a 3-4 character vertical line down the page and must be deciphered. Annoying, but not enough to keep from giving this book 5 stars.
Weiehan
In this book and her later THE GREAT SILENCE Juliet Nicholson brings about a return to the grand social-historical narratives written by scholars and historians of half a decade ago; this book hearkens back to the similar kinds of equally readable and fascinating books by Samuel Hynes, Rupert Croft-Cooke, Leon Edel and James (now Jan) Morris from the 60s, 70s and 80s. The "perfect summer" here is 1911, when the British crown their new king and queen, George and Mary at Westminster Abbey, and when the general transport strikers initiated their great strike; the summer was also the apex of Edwardian glamor, with great costume balls held which were reigned over by the great debutante of the season, Lady Diana Manners. As in THE GREAT SILENCE Nicholson works this narrative as a series of interlocking microbiographies, focusing on characters as diverse as Queen Mary (here not yet the severe and greedy gargoyle she was to become, but a loving mother and wife and intensely shy woman); Elinor Glyn (madly in love with Lord Curzon); the Marchioness of Ripon (the woman to bring the Ballet Russes to London that year for the first time); the great Bohemian painter Augustus John; the butler Eric Horne (who would later become the author of the bestselling tell-all memoir WHAT THE BUTLER WINKED AT); and many more. The emphasis is on gossip and high society, but Nicholson also gives room to details of the great transport strike and the effect it had on dockside workers and the very poor, in one of the work's most gripping chapters.

The book is marred only by a few factual errors that disconcertingly pop up here and there: e.g. NIGHT AND DAY is twice called Virginia Woolf's "first book" (it was actually her second, after THE VOYAGE OUT); Nicholson reports a rumor that the Mona Lisa, which was stolen from the Louvre that year, was shown to someone on the street "rolled up" in paper (which would have been impossible, since Da Vinci painted it on wood); the Russian prime minister is reported assassinated at "a festival" in Kiev, when actually he was shot at the opera; etc. Even so, the book is a great feast for anyone interested in the pre-war period, and the sense of the increasing heat of that summer (the first time when the temperature was recorded at one hundred at Greenwich Observatory) is a deft metaphor for the impeding crisis in the Balkans that will engulf the continent in just a few years.
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