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eBook The Origins of Modern Germany ePub

by Geoffrey Barraclough

eBook The Origins of Modern Germany ePub
Author: Geoffrey Barraclough
Language: English
ISBN: 0393301532
ISBN13: 978-0393301533
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (April 17, 1984)
Pages: 504
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 569
Formats: lrf txt mbr lrf
ePub file: 1611 kb
Fb2 file: 1131 kb

The Origins of Modern Ge. .has been added to your Cart. Starting in the year .

The Origins of Modern Ge. 800, Barraclough traces the political development of Germany, and the book is indeed excellent for its handling of the early Holy Roman Empire, the Investiture Controversy, and the rise and fall of the Hohenstaufens.

Geoffrey Barraclough (10 May 1908, Bradford – 26 December 1984, Burford) was an English historian, known as a medievalist and historian of Germany. He was educated at Bootham School (1921–1924) in York and at Bradford Grammar School (1924–1925). He read History at Oriel College, Oxford University in 1926-1929.

Geoffrey Barraclough. The turbulent history of Germany up to World War II has its roots in a thousand years, from the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 A. D. to hegemony and subsequent foundation of medieval Germany, to the rise of Prussian power under Bismarck. Goeffrey Barraclough’s classic work of historiography deals with this complex millennium with unmatched authority and depth of knowledge.

Barraclough, Geoffrey, 1908-. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station04. cebu on August 2, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Start by marking The Origins of Modern Germany as Want to Read . Goeffrey Barraclough’s classic work of historiography deals with this complex millennium with unmatched authority and depth of knowledg The turbulent history of Germany up to World War II has its roots in a thousand years, from the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 A. The first half of the book ends with the fall of the Hohenstaufens and the Great Interregnum-this period is right within Barraclough's wheelhouse, and his knowledge and feel for the era is masterful.

Geoffrey Barraclough, Jeffrey Barrachlough. From Agadir to Armageddon: Anatomy of a Crisis. Geoffrey Barraclough. Harper Collins Atlas of World History.

by Geoffrey Barraclough. Factors deeply rooted in German history.

item 2 Barraclough Geoffrey-Origins Of Modern Germany (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Barraclough Geoffrey-Origins Of Modern . Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Non-Fiction Books.

Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Non-Fiction Books.

The Scientific Origins of National Socialism. A History of Modern Germany, 1840-1945. The Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, 1890-1933. My conclusion, after reading a score of recent books (some of which it is charitable to pass over in silence), is that we have gotten about as far as we are likely to reach along the road most historians have trodden since 1945, and that the time has come for new directions and new goals. In saying this I am not, of course, presuming to pass judgment on a generation of historical scholarship. Nothing would be more arrogant or futile. B. Blackwell, 1947 - 481 sayfa. 48 sonuçtan 1-3 arası sonuçlar.

“No one is likely to underrate the importance for the rest of Europe―and, indeed, for world history―of the German reaction, beginning in the days of Bismarck, to the crisis of modern industrial capitalism,” writes Professor Barraclough, “but the peculiar character of that reaction is only comprehensible in the light of Germany’s past. Factors deeply rooted in German history . . . constituted an iron framework, a mold within which were cast all German efforts, from 1870 to 1939, to cope with the problems of modern capitalist society.”

The turbulent history of Germany up to World War II has its roots in a thousand years, from the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 A. D. to hegemony and subsequent foundation of medieval Germany, to the rise of Prussian power under Bismarck. Goeffrey Barraclough’s classic work of historiography deals with this complex millennium with unmatched authority and depth of knowledge.
Runemane
I received this book in the mail only this year and have enjoyed reading it. Recently, I have been reading European History from the time of Charlemagne. This book covers a broad section of German History from Charlemagne down to 1939. It spends very little time on the modern period of time from Bismarck until 1939. This is fortunate for me because a large part of the reading about Germany that I have done in my life has been limited to the time from 1870 until the present.

I really wanted to read about the early Middle Ages in Germany, especially the dynasty which is variously called the "Ottonians," the Saxon Dynasty or 1st Reich--the reigns of Henry I (the Fowler) (919-936 in the current era [c.e.]); Otto I (the Great) (936-973 c.e.); Otto II (973-983 c,e,); Otto III (983-1002 c.e.) and Henry II (1002-1024 c.e.) which was followed by the House of Franconia or the "Salians" of Conrad II (1024-1039 c.e.); Henry III, (1039-1056 c.e.) Henry IV (1056-1106 c.e.); Henry V (1106-1125 c.e.); and Lothar (1125-1187 c.e.). Finally the Golden Era that was Germany during this time apparently broke itself on the rocks of the "Investiture Struggle" with the various popes of the Roman Catholic Church. This occurred during the period of rule of Germany by the Hohenstaufen Dynasty. This was during the reigns of Conrad III (1187-1152 c.e.); Frederick I Barbarossa (1152-1190 c.e.); Henry VI (1190-1197 c.e.); Phillip of Swabia (1197-1208 c.e.); Otto IV of the Welf (1198-1215 c.e.); Frederick II (1215-1250 c.e.); Conrad IV (1250-1254 c.e.) and Conradin (1252-1268 c.e.). This book very clearly and easily reveals a history of Germany in the Middle Ages.

One of the most interesting features of Barraclough's book was the discussion of the "Age of Princes." This period of time that followed the death of Frederick II in 1250 c.e. and the downfall of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty, is a time of civil war and confusion which is now called the "Interregnum." The end of the centralizing influenced of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty allowed the rise of the local power of the small dukedoms and princely states into which Germany was eventually divided. Just at a time when the rest of Europe was centralizing into strong nation states, Germany was mired down into a series of small "duke-doms and princeling states. Germany would not emerge from this condition and become a unified modern state until the Bismarckian Era of 1848-1871 c.e.
Kulasius
Probably the best English language account written since World War II of Germany's history up to 1618. The book, written in 1947, covers 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th century German history as well, but much more superficially. Its main focus is clearly on the period between 962 and 1618. His central thesis is that the tensions within Germany and between Germany and its neighbors were almost always a function of the fact that the country was never able to achieve a peaceful sense of national unity due to pressures from within and without. His thesis certainly would apply equally well to the period between World War II and 1990. While the author did not live to see the reunification of Germany in our time he would undoubtedly have agreed that the Germany of today has finally achieved its historical destiny. For anyone interested in the history of Germany this book is all but indispensable.
Yananoc
It is the best book on German history that I have come across. I wore out my first copy and was thrilled they had one in print. It explains many of the issues that led to the great crisis of the 20th century. The atrocities of the World Wars were preceded by others like the 30 Years war and a protracted civil war during the investure contest. A sad tale but it is important to learn from history to keep from repeating our mistakes.
Garne
I purchased this book, in print, to help me understand the area that my paternal ancestors emigrated from in 1854. The book is a very detailed, scholarly treatise, and it is sometimes a bit hard to keep all the detail sorted out, but it is obivously a very well researched book. It was what I was looking for.
Anarawield
I'm enjoying Barraclough's book, but the potential buyer should be clear what it is and isn't.

Starting in the year A.D. 800, Barraclough traces the political development of Germany, and the book is indeed excellent for its handling of the early Holy Roman Empire, the Investiture Controversy, and the rise and fall of the Hohenstaufens.

The accession of the Habsburgs inaugurates "the Age of the Princes," which the author treats with a jaundiced eye. The unstated assumption is that Germany fell behind England and France by failing to come together as a unified state.

Then one gets 100 pages on, brace yourself, 1519 to 1939. (The book was published just after WW2.) I haven't gotten there yet, but it seems safe to guess that the treatment will be on the cursory side, presumably with an emphasis on the continuing repercussions of the medieval background.

So I would hesitate to call this *the* book to read on German history. Holborn's 3-vol. survey is probably better, but Barraclough's incisive analysis makes this a good one to have for the earlier period.
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