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eBook Mons: The Retreat to Victory ePub

by John Terraine

eBook Mons: The Retreat to Victory ePub
Author: John Terraine
Language: English
ISBN: 0850522277
ISBN13: 978-0850522273
Publisher: Leo Cooper; Revised edition (August 1, 1991)
Pages: 224
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 472
Formats: doc lrf mobi azw
ePub file: 1388 kb
Fb2 file: 1510 kb

The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.

The book has been read, but is in excellent condition.

Terraine had 16 books published, most of them dealing with aspects of the great European wars of the 20th century, and numerous . His first major study of the First World War, Mons: The Retreat to Victory was published in 1960.

His first major study of the First World War, Mons: The Retreat to Victory was published in 1960. The Right of the Line: The Royal Air Force in the European War 1939-45 (1985) won the Yorkshire Post Book of the Year award

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Mons: The Retreat To Victory as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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The book also serves to remind us that this first phase of the war was very different from the familiar picture .

The book also serves to remind us that this first phase of the war was very different from the familiar picture of the static trench warfare that came to dominate, but was instead a much more traditional 'war of manoeuvre'. Part One: Into Battle 1 - Departure and Arrival 2 - Meetings 3 - The Fog of War 4 - The Eve of Battle 5 - Mons. Part Two: Retreat 6 - The Retreat Begins 7 - Landrecies and Le Cateau 8 - Lanrezac Fights 9 - The Climax 10 - The Counterstroke.

The mighty continent: A view of Europe in the twentieth century. The Road To Passchendaele. The Flanders Offensive of 1917: A Study In Inevitability. The Smoke and the Fire: Myths and Anti-myths of War, 1861-1945.

Author(s): John Terraine. Title: Mons: The Retreat to Victory. Read full description. Mons: The Retreat to Victory by John Terraine (Paperback, 2010). Brand new: lowest price.

Mons, the retreat to victory. Mons, the retreat to victory. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Mons: The Retreat to Victory (New York: Macmillan, 1960) read online. Mons: The Retreat to Victory (New York: Macmillan, 1960) read online.

Flag as Inappropriate. The Battle of Guise, August 1914 (History Today, 1960) read online. The Army in Modern France (History Today, 1961) read online.

Their fighting retreat from Mons to Le Cateau laid the groundwork for later victories. It was a matter of two weeks before this army went from the dejection of retreat to the exhilaration of victory at the Battle of the Marne-one of the more decisive battles of the world. Visit Seller's Storefront.

In the history of the British Army, Mons takes its place beside Dunkirk and Corunna. All three were initial defeats, saved from disaster by the courage of the soldiers and the skill of some of the commanders in the field. In the context of the whole war, Mons was a small-scale affair, but its importance was crucial, partly because this was the first time for close on 100 years that a British Army had been engaged in warfare on the continent and partly because the army passed straight from the dejection of retreat to the exhilaration of the Battle of the Marne.
TheSuspect
John Terraine (1923-2001) was a historian who set out to correct various myths which had arisen about the First World War, the most persistent of which is that it was all `pointless'. We still hear this one repeated, regularly, by pacifists.

At the time the War was regarded by vast numbers of people in Britain as `The Great War for Civilisation', which had saved Europe from German militarism (and even barbarism). The family of every man who fell was sent a medallion, which bore the that inscription and the words `He died for Honour and for Freedom' on the other side. (I have one, because my grandfather was killed during the last German offensive of March 1918). Thereafter, the poets and revisionists got to work, culminating in the popular film `Oh What A Lovely War!' which portrayed the whole thing as a futile and bloody shambles. Tell that to the Belgians, who were occupied by the Germans for four years; and tell it to the Russians, who had to submit to a dictated peace in 1917, at Brest-Litovsk.

In a series of books, Terraine attempted to show that there was much truth in the inscription on that medal than we had come to believe. He was the mastermind behind the BBC's brilliant series `The Great War' (1964) and the author of `Douglas Haig, the Educated Soldier' (1963) which attempted to refute the idea that Haig was merely the leading `donkey', in an undistinguished cast of British generals.

`Mons' is now re-published by `Pen & Sword' and this is most welcome. It was first published in 1960. It takes us back to August 1914, before the world learned the meaning of trench warfare and before the War Poets started to spread their insidious messages of defeatism, to a time when the War was still one of movement and battles were unpredictable, though everyone hoped it would all be over by Christmas. It criticises the generals on all sides, but in a moderate and meaningful way. It explains the strategy, in terms we can understand. There are some great anecdotes (for example, of how Sir John French tried to speak French to his opposite number); and the narrative is nicely woven with personal memoirs.

The book marked the first chapter in Terraine's revision of the revisionists. He shows, above all, that the British assisted the French greatly in slowing down the German invasion of France in 1914. Had they not done so, the Schlieffen Plan might well have worked. It might have been 1870 all over again; or to put it another way, it could have been 1940, 25 years early. The French might have been knocked out of the war and the British Army destroyed, with incalculable consequences for Europe and democracy. Make no mistake about it, the Germans were just as much of a threat in 1914 as they were 1939; and, though we no longer like to mention it, they did start both World Wars.

The book is eminently readable, though the maps are not as good as one might have hoped for; and the layman will wish for an explanation of the numbers. (How many troops in a battalion, and how many in a division?)

Stephen Cooper
Alsanadar
Seems like John Terraine had (he's deceased) that obesssion to turn every battelfied disasters and military blunders of the British into something else, and in the process had judiciously/maliciously doctored his researches to cast the best possible light on what mere mortals will call fiascos.

Read this as cheap trash fiction, as there are no references to sources, no bibiography at all. All we have is Terraine's words that the 'Old Contemptibles" were the most magnificient army in the world, that they trumphed every encounters with the Germans ( a division is supposed to be smashed by the bloody Tommies when they captured 78 prisoners!) and that every other one of those morons won a VC!

Being the first work of fiction written by Terraine, this book sets the standard for his later owrks!
Phobism
An excellent study of a crucial engaement early in the war. A must read for anyone interested in the First World War.
Lucam
Great read - many thanks
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