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eBook The History of the Balkan Peninsula: From the Earliest Times to the Present (The Eastern Europe collection) ePub

by Ferdinand Schevill

eBook The History of the Balkan Peninsula: From the Earliest Times to the Present (The Eastern Europe collection) ePub
Author: Ferdinand Schevill
Language: English
ISBN: 0405027745
ISBN13: 978-0405027741
Publisher: Ayer Co Pub (June 1, 1970)
Pages: 558
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 134
Formats: docx mobi mbr doc
ePub file: 1546 kb
Fb2 file: 1184 kb

by. Schevill, Ferdinand, 1868-1954. Eastern question (Balkan), Balkan Peninsula - History. University of Toronto - Robarts Library.

by. New York Harcourt, Brace. Uploaded by Pierre Custodio on April 3, 2008.

This book is concerned with the story of man on the southeastern projection of Europe, known as the Balkan peninsula

This book is concerned with the story of man on the southeastern projection of Europe, known as the Balkan peninsula. For practical purposes the story begins with the Greeks, because the Greeks, though not the original inhabitants of the peninsula, were the first to leave a clear record of themselves and their neighbors. From the Hellenic period, when the mists hiding the land from view begin to lift, to the twentieth century of the Christian era is a span of about three thousand years. During that long stretch of time what migrations, wars, settlements, worships, and civilizations make their.

I bought Ferdinand Schevill's book because I wanted to learn more about the Balkan peninsula from another point of view besides that of the Ottoman Empire. This book is larded with asides to the reader which, after a few pages, become quite annoying

I bought Ferdinand Schevill's book because I wanted to learn more about the Balkan peninsula from another point of view besides that of the Ottoman Empire. This book is larded with asides to the reader which, after a few pages, become quite annoying. The author's value judgments are another annoyance which, when coupled with his references to "the yellow races," make the book an unpleasant read. Before this book, I read Dennis P. Hupchick's "The Balkans from Constantinople to Communism.

by Ferdinand Schevill. The Balkan QuestionThe Present Condition of the Balkans and of European Responsibilitiesby Luigi Villari.

The History of the Balkan Peninsula, From the Earliest Times, to the Present Day. The History of the Balkan Peninsula, From the Earliest Times, to the Present Dayby Ferdinand Schevill. by Ferdinand Schevill. The History of ItalyTranslated From the Italian of Francesco Guicciardiniby Francesco Guicciardini. Europe and BeyondA Preliminary Survey of World-Politics Politics in the Last Half-Century 1870-1920by J. A. R. Marriott.

The History of the Balkan Peninsula: From the Earliest Times to the Present Day, Select Bibliographies Reprint Series, Ferdinand Schevill, Ayer Publishing, 1922, SBN 0836959086. U. of Chicago Library - Ferdinand Schevill papers - Biographical Note. University of Chicago Library, Guide to the Ferdinand Schevill Papers.

Ferdinand Schevill1 ਜਨਵਰੀ 1922. Eastern question (Balkan). A Political History of Modern Europe from the Reformation to the Present Day. Ferdinand Schevill. Imagining the Balkans. Harcourt, Brace and Company. History, Europe, Eastern. If the Balkans hadn't existed, they would have been invented" was the verdict of Count Hermann Keyserling in his famous 1928 publication, Europe. Over ten years ago, Maria Todorova traced the relationship between the reality and the invention.

From the Earliest Times to the Present (Eastern Europe Collection). Created by an anonymous user. Published June 1970 by Arno Press.

The History Of The Ba. . An Orientalist, Islamophobic, laughably incorrect book of history that is more useful in analyzing the author's biases than accurate history. The history of the Balkans and the numerous empires that have ruled over them-from the ancient Greeks to the 1920s. Complex and informative.

Present-day Albania is located between the former Yugoslavia and Greece on the western shore of the Balkan peninsula, and is the least known European country. As the last Turkish province in Europe it was tightly closed to foreigners over the centuries, and until recently the country was even more isolated by its postwar Communist regime. Historically described as mysterious and xenophobic, the people and the country are both little known to most westerners-but are destined to enter the world's consciousness situated as they are in the midst of explosive Balkan conflicts.

Kalrajas
Heavy reading for a non-historian or a reader with little knowledge of the area. This turn of the 20th century monograph covers soup to nuts beginning the Greeks, and marching through time, until the first and second Balkan Wars. Although the author details the traditional topics such as, the Byzantine Empire, Coming of the Ottoman Turks and the Ottoman Empire, and 19th century wars,Ferdinand Schevill examines little known countries and their roles in the area. Moldova, Bulgaria,Serbia, Albania, and Bosnia are given more than a token analysis. Some might object to some of the author's comments such as, calling Ragusa a Serbian city. Croatia and Slovenia are totally left out of the analysis of the area because the author considers these countries to be more Central European. A tedious read but worth the struggle.
Nejind
According to the copyright page of "A History of the Balkans," this book was published in 1991. On page 80, it says "down to our own day (1918)...." And on page 519 it says "but so far (June 1922)...."

I bought Ferdinand Schevill's book because I wanted to learn more about the Balkan peninsula from another point of view besides that of the Ottoman Empire. This book is larded with asides to the reader which, after a few pages, become quite annoying. The author's value judgments are another annoyance which, when coupled with his references to "the yellow races," make the book an unpleasant read.

Before this book, I read Dennis P. Hupchick's "The Balkans from Constantinople to Communism." Of the two, I'd recommend Hupchick's book for its to-the-point style. Also, Hupchick's book has much clearer maps.
Alsantrius
As a student of Balkan history and socio-linguistics I found this book to be a very good amd well detailed analysis of the region and answers many questions about how specific areas became what they are today. While very good detail is afforded to the influence of the Ottomans and Byzantines I was surprised that one critical historical event was mot mentioned; the effects of the plague on Balkan societies and how they were able to cope with i, and how the region was changes. This could have easily been given a chapter since the majority of Europe's population was decimated.
Kamuro
Mr. Schevill provides an intriguing overview of a part of the world that has certainly influenced world events beyond their size and scope.
Jorius
This is a very authoritative, well-written history of the Balkans, perfect for the intelligent lay reader. I much liked the author's confident statement of his own educated opinions, so refreshing by contrast with more recent, wishy-washy works by young historians terrified of offending anyone.
My only wish is that the text were accompanied by better maps.
Hap
good
Ylonean
Why study Byzantine and Ottoman history as it relates to the Balkans...?

Simply because you can't understand any other part of European history without knowing about this key region...and it's key players--the Eastern Romans of Constantinople, and later the Ottomans.

I am amazed that anyone would even try to understand European history from 600AD to 1914...without having a clear grasp of Byzantine and Ottoman history... This period in Europe was at the end of the Roman Empire...but before the current nation states of Europe were fully formed...or even imagined. The only "super power" during these key formative years was Byzantium a/k/a Constantinople,...later called Istanbul under the Ottomans...

My copy of this book is well marked up...and I won't part with it...

The writing style is highly readable...not forced or needlessly obscure... In short, this book is a "page turner" if you are interested in really understanding...not only the Balkans which are really the pawns in the story...but the other nations that made the Balkans their main geopolitical focus for a thousand years...which, quite frankly, was all of Europe as we now know it!
I read this book as after reading "Short History of Byzantium" and "Ottoman Centuries." My biggest concern in choosing from the available material was finding an objective history that wasn't influenced by the events of the past decade or even, if possible, the cold war. The market has been flooded in recent years with books attempting to "explain" current events in Serbia, et al.

I found what I was looking for in this book. Published ~1920, the author's language can come across archaic at times, but is not difficult to read. He has a dry wit and insight which shines through, making it quite enjoyable.

Although he pays passing tribute to the Greeks, the primary focus on the region's history begins with the Byzantine empire, followed by Ottoman, which was still in the process of finding it's present day role in the world as the Republic of Turkey at the time this book was published.

High marks go to Schevill for his ability to interweave European politics and their impact on the region (Russia's desire for control of the Balkans from the time of Peter the Great forward; Napoleon's brief alliance with Russia for the same purpose; Austria-Hungary influence)

This is history at its finest - a must read for anyone with more that a passing interest in the subject.
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