lind-peinture
» » Shaping the Nation: England 1360-1461 (New Oxford History of England)

eBook Shaping the Nation: England 1360-1461 (New Oxford History of England) ePub

by Gerald Harriss

eBook Shaping the Nation: England 1360-1461 (New Oxford History of England) ePub
Author: Gerald Harriss
Language: English
ISBN: 0198228163
ISBN13: 978-0198228165
Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 24, 2005)
Pages: 726
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 537
Formats: lit lrf lit doc
ePub file: 1106 kb
Fb2 file: 1474 kb

A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. The greater merchants controlled the wool trade, the source of England's wealth, and distributed commodities through a network of towns and markets.

A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. The political narrative centres on the deposition of Richard II in 1399 and the establishment of the House of Lancaster, which was in turn overthrown in the Wars of the Roses.

Gerald Harriss' volume in the New Oxford History of England is immensely readable and full of memorable insight and incident. Harriss is a master at encapsulating complex truths in vivid images. Superbly done, simultaneously exciting and informative, a remarkable achievement in a book of this nature: Dr Harriss writes with a rare lucidity which never surrenders to over-simplification on the one hand or to over-elaboration on the other.

The greater merchants controlled the wool trade, the source of England's wealth, and distributed commodities through a network of towns and markets.

Published by Oxford University Press, United Kingdom (2007). The marked individualism ofthis society, memorably depicted in The Canterbury Tales, was accompanied by a growing sense of national identity, expressed in the use of standard London English.

3. Description this book The Black Death. The Hundred Years War. The War of the Roses. A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. co/hv8Bc if you want to download this book OR. Recommended.

The War of the Roses. The political narrative centers on the deposition of Richard II in 1399 and the establishment of the House of Lancaster, which was in turn overthrown in the Wars of the Roses.

Michael Prestwich, Plantagenet England, 1225–1360. The New Oxford History of England. James Gillespie - 1987 - Speculum 62 (1):137-139. The Nation, the Law and the King. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Pp. Xxiii, 638 Plus 17 Black-and-White Plates; Tables and Maps. Reform Politics in England, 1789-1799. Emma Macleod - 2007 - Enlightenment and Dissent 23:167-173.

Yet the institutional core of the story which runs from Anglo-Saxon times to our own is the story of a state-structure built round the English monarchy and its effective successor, the Crown in Parliament.

Journal of British Studies. New Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Janet A. Meisel (a1). University of Texas at Austin. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 21 December 2012.

Professor Harriss' work covers the century running from 1360 through to 1460.

The New Oxford History of England is a book series on the history of the British Isles. It was commissioned in 1992 and has produced eleven volumes to date. At least six volumes are still forthcoming. It is the successor to the Oxford History of England (1934–86). The volumes published or announced for the new series are (as of 2010) as follows: England under the Norman and Angevin Kings, 1075–1225 - Robert Bartlett (2002), ISBN 9780199251018.

The Black Death. The Peasants' Revolt. The Hundred Years War. The War of the Roses. A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. In his lucid and penetrating account of this formative period, Gerald Harriss draws on the research of the last thirty years to illuminate late medieval society at its peak, from the triumphalism of Edward III in 1360 to the collapse of Lancastrian rule. The political narrative centers on the deposition of Richard II in 1399 and the establishment of the House of Lancaster, which was in turn overthrown in the Wars of the Roses. Abroad, Henry V's heroic victory at Agincourt in 1415 led to the English conquest of northern France, lasting until 1450. Both produced long term consequences: the first shaped the English constitution up to the Stuart civil war, while the second generated lasting hostility between England and France, and a residual wariness of military intervention in Europe.
Pringles
I've learned by now that although the Oxford History of England series is ostensibly written for a general audience, it doesn't always hit the mark. Readers are expected to be familiar with the major figures, events and culture of the period, and if they aren't, the author won't coddle them. It's not surprising, since these books run to 6- or 700 pages, and there's scarcely a wasted word. If you said more than you absolutely had to, the binding would probably burst.

But sometimes the stinginess goes too far. I'm not sure who at Oxford Press breaks English history into chunks and assigns them to historians, but the basic problem is this: 1360 through 1461 is too much history for one book. As usual, the blurb on the dust jacket seems to understand the problem better than anybody: "The Black Death, the Peasants' Revolt, the Hundred Years War, the Wars of the Roses..." This list is supposed to make the book sound thrilling, but (and it doesn't even mention the overthrow of Richard II, the development of Middle English, the Lollard movement, or the Welsh Revolt) it just reminds you that this volume is overstuffed.

No one event gets the treatment it deserves. They've written entire books about the Hundred Years War from 1360 to 1453, but here it receives only 74 pages. Geoffrey Chaucer (along with culture in general) goes almost unmentioned, and he was by far the most important English author before Shakespeare. Hotspur's revolt gets about two-thirds of a page.

This squeeze extends to the style. Except for a valedictory paragraph on 3 of the 5 kings covered, no attempt is made to draw out the character of the major figures. Maybe it's my own ignorance that makes the various lords in the lead-up to the Wars of the Roses seem utterly indistinguishable, venal, partisan dummies -- but Harriss doesn't help.

Again, I'm not sure this is the author's fault. On the other hand, he might have dedicated less space to the nature of peasantry and nobility, agriculture and municipal government. Yes, they changed over the course of a hundred years, and it was good to be apprised of e.g. the changing relations between farmers and landlords after the Black Death -- but here Harriss *does* assume we have no background knowledge, and explains inheritance law and the difference between upland and lowland farming, as if these subjects hadn't already been covered in the preceding volume (and, I'm sure, the next volume, when it's published.)

There are interesting topics here -- I know there are -- but reading a book like this gives me indigestion. Maybe it's me. Everyone else seems to like this volume. Maybe I just need my history cut up into smaller bites, but when I can learn more about English history from Shakespeare than from Oxford, something is wrong.
Jorius
I purchased this book as a general history for an independent study and have returned to it again and again for other undergraduate and graduate level studies. Clearly written with an adherence to the historical timeline which makes it very useful for tracking developments within English Early Modern society.
Excellent all-around volume for serious students.
Vivaral
Here is another book that I bought for a class about 2.5 (?) years ago. I still look up information from Harriss, and know that I can find it.
Bumand
This book is my third purchase from a series and was sent in a timely manner and in the described shape - ie new.
Would happily recommend the supplier
Gugrel
This is a wonderful and thorough discussion of English politics and society over a long stretch of medieval history. Harriss spends two-thirds of the book analyzing governmental institutions and the social hierarchy: the king and his court, the layers of the nobility, the gentry and the growing sub-gentry. He shows how agrarian society was permanently changed by economic growth early in the 14th century, the 100 Years War and the Black Death, serving to increase economic freedom and mobility among the peasants. These changes led to the demise of serfdom and growth of the sub-gentry class. The "political class" grows to include not only the nobility but gentry and sub-gentry: the sub-gentry could own land, the gentry and yeoman class managed local government, and freeholders could vote for Parliament, thereby becoming more vocal in political life.

The conception of the "common weal" or welfare thus came to include the viewpoint and perspective of all these layers of society, not just the king and his powerful magnates. This expansion of the political class continued well into the 17th century.

The last third of the book consists of the typical narrative of major domestic and foreign policy issues. Since the book covers such a long period during which there was tumult everywhere, Harriss doesn't go into detail about any one reign. If you want a detailed analysis of Richard II or Henry V, this isn't the book for you. He purposely stops at the beginning of the Wars of the Roses, actually summarizing the first War, 1459-61.

He does a good job summarizing the major developments of the 100 Years War; it was just right for me. He short-changed the domestic tumult over 1413-61 however. This is the lead-up to the Wars of the Roses and an extremely complicated period. I'm reading about the Wars now and have found the Alison Weir and Christine Carpenter books have helped me understand this lead-up period better than Harriss. That said, the summary here is going to be fine for many. Harriss probably wisely decided not to duplicate the efforts of many other books.

This book is long and academic but not dry or stuffy. It's well-written and moves well. I think it's worth the time and effort if, like me, you're interested in the sociology of the period as a whole, not just the major headlines.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only