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eBook V-1 Flying Bomb 1942–52: Hitler’s infamous “doodlebug” (New Vanguard) ePub

by Steven J. Zaloga,Jim Laurier

eBook V-1 Flying Bomb 1942–52: Hitler’s infamous “doodlebug” (New Vanguard) ePub
Author: Steven J. Zaloga,Jim Laurier
Language: English
ISBN: 1841767913
ISBN13: 978-1841767918
Publisher: Osprey Publishing (January 1, 2005)
Pages: 48
Category: Europe
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 446
Formats: lit txt lrf mbr
ePub file: 1840 kb
Fb2 file: 1350 kb

New Vanguard 82: V-2 Ballistic Missile 1942-52. This book deals with the V-1 Flying Bomb,from its inception,its development,and its strugle to become an operational weapon of terror.

New Vanguard 82: V-2 Ballistic Missile 1942-52. This is a very short paged book with excellent color diagrams and period b/w photos;a good introductory book.

Jim Laurier is a native of New Hampshire

Known to the Allies as the "Buzz Bomb" or "Doodlebug", the V-1 was the world's first cruise missile. Jim Laurier is a native of New Hampshire

Steven Zaloga, Jim Laurier

Steven Zaloga, Jim Laurier. Known to the Allies as the "Buzz Bomb" or "Doodlebug", the V-1 was the world's first cruise missile. This book explores the V-1 in detail, from its initial concept, first use in 1944, the various Allied counter-measures, and the later use of the V-1 during the Battle of the Bulge. The major foreign derivatives, including the US copy "JB-2 Loon" and numerous post-war Soviet variants, are also covered.

V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52: Hitler infamous "doodlebug" (New Vanguard) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Steven J. Zaloga, Jim Laurier

Steven J. Zaloga, Jim Laurier.

Jim Laurier is a native of New Hampshire

V-1 Flying Bomb 1942–52: Hitler’s infamous doodlebug - Steven J. Zaloga எழுதிய மின்புத்தகம். ங்கள் கம்ப்யூட்டர், Android, iOS சாதனங்களில் Google Play புக்ஸ் ஆப்ஸில் இந்தப் புத்தகத்தைப் படிக்கலாம். Steven J Zaloga received his BA in history from Union College and his MA from Columbia University. Jim Laurier is a native of New Hampshire. He graduated with honors from the Paiers School of Art, Connecticut, in 1978 and has worked as a freelance illustrator ever since, completing assignments in a wide variety of fields.

V-1 Flying Bomb 1942–52 - Steven J. Zaloga. The V-1 flying bomb was the most widely used guided missile of World War II and the world’s first successful cruise missile. V-1 Flying bomb 1942–52: hitler’s infamous doodlebug. In comparison to its wartime stable-mate, the V-2 ballistic missile, the V-1 was significantly simpler, easier to manufacture, and more practical to operate in combat conditions. It was employed for terror attacks against London, Antwerp and other European cities, causing tens of thousands of civilian casualties. Zaloga, Jim Laurier Series: New Vanguard. Series: New Vanguard. File: PDF, 1. 1 MB. 在线阅读.

Title: V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52 Author: Zaloga, Steven . Laurier, Jim (ILT) Publisher: Osprey Pub Co Publication Date: 2005/01/02 Number of Pages: 48 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: oc2007026688 V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52: Hitler's Infamous doodlebug (Ne. . Laurier, Jim (ILT) Publisher: Osprey Pub Co Publication Date: 2005/01/02 Number of Pages: 48 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: oc2007026688 V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52: Hitler's Infamous doodlebug (New Vanguard Series). manufacturer part number.

Jim Laurier (illustrator). Brand new Book 5. V-1 Flying Bomb 1942?52: Hitler?s infamous ?doodlebug? (New Vanguard)

Jim Laurier (illustrator). 5. V-1 Flying Bomb 1942?52: Hitler?s infamous ?doodlebug? (New Vanguard).

The first deployment of the V-1 was in June 1944 when, following two years of tests, Hitler gave the order to attack England. Known to the Allies as the "Buzz Bomb" or "Doodlebug", the V-1 was the world's first cruise missile. This book explores the V-1 in detail, from its initial concept, first use in 1944, the various Allied counter-measures, and the later use of the V-1 during the Battle of the Bulge. The major foreign derivatives, including the US copy "JB-2 Loon" and numerous post-war Soviet variants, are also covered.
Hellmaster
This book provides a very good overview of the physical characteristics of the weapon, how the weapon developed over the course the war and its variations (including manned versions). The book also provides a decent analysis of how it was operated, its operational success (i.e., percentage making it to target, etc.) and what counter-measures were applied by the allies and how effective these were. All of this, per se, make this a very interesting read for those with an interest in the weapon. This is particularly the case considering the very short length of the book (48 pages, about a third of which consist of illustration). In addition, the book is relatively well illustrated with decent color plates of the weapon, a cut-away that is good and many contemporaneous photographs showing variations of the weapon and launch sites.

The book also provides decent facts regarding the costs of the weapon to the Germans (i.e., they cost 2% of a twin engine bomber, at their peak use they accounted for about half of all high explosives production in Germany, etc.). The costs to the allies of countering this weapon are also discussed. The number of anti-aircraft weapons is mentioned, for example, as is the fact that about 15% of all air operations were used, in one way or another, in countering this weapon through raids on launch sites, production facilities and reconnaissance relating to the weapon. However, there is no mention of the number of aircraft lost on these operations or the opportunity cost of these counter-measures. Nor is there a mention of how they may have forced the British and Americans to (possibly) pursue thrusts into Northern Belgium and Holland that may well have reduced resources available for the main thrust into Germany proper. Hence the author's argument that the V-1s were a great waste of resources with little positive benefit for Germany may not be entirely accurate.
Phalaken
Not a lot of info on this topic. A great read to help with the mystery
allegro
GREAT little book
Samutilar
Excellent review of the overall V-1 through the United States adaptations. I wish that there were drawings of some of the support transport dollies. It is an excellent read and addition to my library.
Burirus
I greatly enjoyed this authors insight, details and facts. This book is a fine addition to my V-1 Buzzbomb book collection. Worth the purchase price.V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52: Hitler's infamous 'doodlebug' (New Vanguard)
Vetitc
This book deals with the V-1 Flying Bomb,from its inception,its development,and its strugle to become an operational weapon of terror.This is a very short paged book with excellent color diagrams and period b/w photos;a good introductory book.
Awene
Good little book on this
Military technical expert Stephen J. Zaloga delivers another excellent summary of a major weapons program in Osprey's New Vanguard #106, V-1 Flying Bomb 1942-52. As usual, Zaloga delivers the commonly known facts with incisive comments, while also offering insights into the lesser-known facets of the program. While the German V-1 rocket program has certainly received considerable attention from other writers, few readers will be aware that US, French and Soviets were all flying copies of the weapons after the war. On the other hand, Zaloga's conclusion that the V-1 program was not only a failure but one that actually hurt the German war effort appears based upon either specious information or faulty analysis. Nevertheless, Zaloga's volume on the V-1 is well worth having since there is a considerable amount of information packed into these pages.

Zaloga begins with a background section on the antecedents of the V-1 program and the early prototype tests. The author makes interesting observations about how the German Luftwaffe felt that it needed a rocket program of its own to compete with the Army's V-2 program, and the V-1 fit the bill of quickly fielding a competitor (file this under bureaucratic motivations for weapons programs). The rocket motor technology used in the V-1 was much simpler than that used in the V-2, although even by 1944 the pulse-jet technology of the V-1 was approaching a dead-end (the engine virtually shook itself to death by the end of its short flight of only 130 miles). On the other hand, the V-1 was ready to deploy by late 1943 but Allied bombing and German mismanagement delayed its combat debut until June 1944. Nagging technical problems with the gyroscopes and fuel-pressure system limited the V-1s performance further, and also made it easier for the rocket to be shot down by aircraft. Zaloga notes that British intelligence had a pretty good read on the V-1 program and bombed the deployment sites and factories mercilessly, but this only delayed the onset of the robot bombardment of London. Zaloga details the ground launches from France and the Low Countries, as well as the air-launches over the North Sea. The author also provides tables detailing V-1 production by month, the Crossbow bombing campaign, the organization of the V-1 launch units as well as diagrams of launch sites and the rocket in various configurations.

Zaloga notes that the V-1 cost about $2,000 each, compared with about $50,000 for a V-2 and $100,000 for a medium bomber. Over 30,000 V-1s were built and they killed over 10,000 people, including about 1,000 Allied military personnel. Zaloga says, "in retrospect, the V-1 was a far more cost effective weapon than the V-2 in terms of the much smaller cost of developing, manufacturing, and employing the missile." However, Zaloga believes that the V-1 program hurt the German war effort, saying "the warheads of the V-weapons consumed the equivalent of half the total explosive consumption of the entire Wehrmacht in the critical months of July, August and September 1944 ...at a time when the fate of the Third Reich was in the balance, the V-weapons were wasting more than half of the available explosives to kill a thousand British and Belgian civilians a month." Apparently, Zaloga is suggesting that the 7,700 tons of high explosive that went into producing warheads for the V-1s in this 3-month period so depleted Germany of critical munitions that the war was lost. This assertion is ridiculous on many levels (and very atypical of the normally very precise Zaloga), starting with the basic fact that Germany was manufacturing over 100,000 tons of munitions per month in this period, so the V-1 program used no more than 2-3% of the German output of explosives, not 50%. In fact, German explosives production fell in late 1944 because Allied bomber raids on the synthetic fuel plants, which led to a reduction in the output of nitrogen for explosives (German agriculture was also using 50% of the nitrogen production in 1944, which could have gone for explosives). The Allied post-war strategic bombing survey clearly spells this linkage out and Zaloga's assertion that it was the V-1 program that was the culprit for the ammunition shortage is specious.

The V-1 program needs to be put in strategic perspective but Zaloga does not do this. While British bomber raids on Berlin often lost 30-40 bombers and over 300 aircrew to kill a few hundred German civilians, the V-1s accomplished strategic bombardment without risking German lives, at less cost and with at least as much accuracy as British night raids achieved (which often missed Berlin entirely). If killing civilians was the goal, the V-1s did it better than the very expensive British Bomber Command. However, the V-1 had a strategic effect that Zaloga does not mention - the bombardment of London so angered Churchill that Eisenhower was pressured to let Montgomery clear out the V-1 launch sites in London. Thus, the V-1 campaign led to the disastrous Operation Market-Garden and the virtual destruction of the British 1st Airborne Division - not bad for $60,000 worth of rockets. Without the V-1 program, there would have been much less justification for Monty's drive into Holland and Patton might have gotten enough supplies (and the airborne troops) to crack the West wall in 1944. Thus, it is quite possible that the V-1 program actually prolonged the war, albeit only for a few months.
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