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eBook Napoleonic Artillery ePub

by Paul L. Dawson,Stephen Summerfield,Anthony L. Dawson

eBook Napoleonic Artillery ePub
Author: Paul L. Dawson,Stephen Summerfield,Anthony L. Dawson
Language: English
ISBN: 1861269234
ISBN13: 978-1861269232
Publisher: The Crowood Press UK (May 15, 2008)
Pages: 304
Category: Military
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 825
Formats: mbr doc lit lrf
ePub file: 1132 kb
Fb2 file: 1495 kb

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Images of War - Armoured Warfare and the Fall of France Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives. Anthony Tucker-Jones.

He is a resident of West Yorkshire, England. Stephen Summerfield has written extensively on the guns of the Napoleonic Wars.

Ships from and sold by indoobestsellers. He is a resident of West Yorkshire, England. He is a resident of Hull, England. Paul Dawson has written extensively on the guns of the Napoleonic Wars. Anthony Dawson has written extensively on the guns of the Napoleonic Wars.

The Napoleonic Wars gripped Europe, and beyond, for over ten years at the beginning of the Nineteenth century

The Napoleonic Wars gripped Europe, and beyond, for over ten years at the beginning of the Nineteenth century. Hundreds of battles were fought between the armies of France (and its allies) and all those powers that wished to see Napoleon Bonaparte stopped in his tracks and an end to the French Empire. The battles and sieges of the Napoleonic Wars, which cost the lives of between 3 and 6 million men, made unprecedented use of large guns, and every participating army possessed a range of artillery.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Anthony L. Dawson's books. Anthony L. Dawson’s Followers (2). Dawson. Dawson’s books. Napoleonic Artillery by. Paul L. Dawson, Stephen Summerfield.

Author: Anthony Dawson. Author: Stephen Summerfield. Format: Hardback, 304 Pages. He is a resident of Hull, England

Author: Anthony Dawson.

Napoleonic Artillery. Download with Google

Napoleonic Artillery. Download with Google. Napoleonic Artillery. As a result 170 Siege, Coastal and Garrison Ordnance French post-1789 garrison and coast defence carriage Paul L. Dawson 2006 0 cm 50 cm 100 cm 150 cm 200 cm The French post-1789 garrison and coast defence car- from the field artillery; Rostaing made axles and riage, on a traversing-platform designed by Berthalot. wheels for each calibre of gun interchangeable.

Resident - West Yorkshire Stephen Summerfield has written extensively on the guns of the Napoleonic Wars. Resident - Hull show more. 5 33% (1). 4 33% (1). Dawson, Paul L. Richard II (Oxford Shakespeare). William Shakespeare, Anthony B. Dawson, Paul Yachnin. Category: Shakespeare, William, Richard II. 1 Mb.

Anthony Douglas Gillon Dawson (18 October 1916 – 8 January 1992) was a Scottish actor, best known for his supporting roles as villains in British films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder (1954) and Midnight Lace (1960), as well as play.

Anthony Douglas Gillon Dawson (18 October 1916 – 8 January 1992) was a Scottish actor, best known for his supporting roles as villains in British films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder (1954) and Midnight Lace (1960), as well as playing Professor Dent in the James Bond film Dr. No (1962). He also appeared as Ernst Stavro Blofeld in From Russia with Love (1963) and Thunderball (1965). Dawson was born in Edinburgh, the son of Ida Violet (Kittel) and Eric Francis Dawson.

The Napoleonic Wars gripped Europe, and beyond, for over ten years at the beginning of the Nineteenth century. Hundreds of battles were fought between the armies of France (and its allies) and all those powers that wished to see Napoleon Bonaparte stopped in his tracks and an end to the French Empire. The battles and sieges of the Napoleonic Wars, which cost the lives of between 3 and 6 million men, made unprecedented use of large guns, and every participating army possessed a range of artillery. With the wars covering such a long period of time, and with so many armies involved, the subject of Napoleonic artillery is a complicated one, and no work has attempted to examine all the weapons involved in a single, detailed volume. Until now. The product of years of research, this book presents most of what is known about the artillery pieces of the Napoleonic Wars. Including numerous drawings, contemporary illustrations and modern photographs of surviving guns, it will be an invaluable addition to the library of historians, modellers, wargamers and re-enactors.
Llanonte
This is a Herculean effort and, yes, it does contain errors- too many errors perhaps; but nothing else like this book exists at present. I would have been happier if the book contained fewer errors, but I would be much less happy if it did not exist at all. Perhaps the authors were too ambitious. I don't know, but until I see something better, I will settle for this. There are probably many people who are more knowledgeable about some of the topics covered in this book, but I doubt that anyone knows more about everything covered in this book. Some of the reviews of this book were very critical; but, at least from my point of view, their reviews were not very helpful. This book is about “Napoleonic Artillery“ and none of the critics told me anything new about Napoleonic artillery that I found useful. If you can tell me something that will correct errors in the book and provide me with new useful information about Napoleonic artillery, I will be happy. If all you want to do is criticize the authors, I am not interested.

Some reviewers make a big deal about the incorrect description of the function of canister shot. Yes, it is a major error, but not because you cannot find other sources of information. The functioning of canister shot is described in detail on many Internet sites. You can even see detailed descriptions and demonstrations on U-tube. Also, this section still contains interesting contemporary comment on the effects of canister that is both interesting and correct, so it is not a complete bust.

For me, the problem is that the the incorrect description of how canister works makes rubbish of the discussion of Shrapnel. I don't know when the first person threw a handful of stones at a bird, but the concept of using multiple projectiles to increase your chances of hitting your target certainly predates guns and was used in guns soon after their invention. In the Napoleonic area, canister generally involved loading a quantity a small balls, generally iron, into tinned (tinned sheet iron, not tin) cylinders. When fired from a cannon, the cylinder disintegrated as it left the cannon, turning it, in effect, into a very big shotgun. This was very effective at short range, but had little or no effect past about 300 meters. Now, I'm sure many people thought that finding some way to extend the range of canister would be very useful and I'm sure that there were many efforts, in many different countries, to solve this. It was really a no brainer. The point is not that Shrapnel came up with the idea of the need for such a projectile, the point is that he was the one, the only one, to develop a practical projectile that solved this problem. And for this he deserves credit. He developed a shell that contained a number of lead or iron balls and a small bursting charge just sufficient to open the shell. The fuse was set to explode the shell a short distance short of the target. When the shell opened, the balls continued at the same velocity that the shell had, producing a canister effect, but at much longer ranges than standard canister. He developed this projectile on his own time and mainly with his own money. For this, he got little credit during his life, not because his invention was not appreciated, but because it was viewed as so important that it needed to be kept a secret. After he died, at his descendents request, his invention was named " Shrapnel", rather than the earlier name of “Spherical Case”. I think he deserves this respect.

There are also some errors in their description of Russian artillery. It is true that in the guns of the system of 1805, the gun tubes had flat rather than round bases and the the touch holes were moved to in front of the base rings, but only after 1808. In the original 1805 designs the bases were still round and the touch holes were still located behind the base rings. Also, the axles in the system of 1805 were wood, not metal, as the authors claim. I'm not sure, but I think that their drawings of Russian guns, described as a medium 12-pdr and a ½ pud unicorn, are really a 6-pdr and ¼ pud unicorn. The gun is certainly not a medium 12-pdr, since only the light 12- pdr and the 6-pdr guns were fitted with boxes between the trails, as shown in the drawing.

Their description of Russian limbers is also a little scrambled. They state correctly that there were two limber designs, one for the heavy and one for the light artillery. Both were topped with boxes. The box for the heavy artillery was small and flat topped and was divided into two parts. The boxes for the light artillery were larger with rounded tops, like the example shown on page 213, and were divided into cells. The description in the book run the descriptions of both boxes together.

In this review I have attempted to describe what I like about this book and to include detailed correction to some of the errors that I found, rather than to just criticize the authors. If other reviewers would do the same, I think that it could be very helpful.
Ndlaitha
Fantastic information on guns and vehicals used by all countries of the Napoleoic age
Kazracage
Informative in word and diagram. Well written, able to maintain interest in reading this book. Explanations and diagrams easily understood by anyone.
Marilore
I was greatly anticipating this book, and sadly was greatly disappointed upon receiving it. I've purchased dozens of books through Amazon. Some I've loved, some I've hated. This is the only one I've ever returned. 'nuff said.
AfinaS
This title, although very disappointing overall, is a welcome addition to the Napoleonic scene. It is welcome because we need as many titles on Napoleonic topics as possible, although obviously, some will not rise to the level of classics, in the way I feel that Mikaberidze's book on Borodino and Gill's 1809 series. The title does contain a lot of information but sadly, it also appears to contain a major blunder concerning the description of canister. Forgivable in a general Napoleonic title perhaps, but I feel unforgivable in one on Artillery! And worse, considering that the book's hype boasts that 'years' of research went into it. The book does contain a considerable amount of photos but many are clearly the work of an amateur photographer. Most are taken from too far away or just too dark to make out any real details. And many of them are photos of models, not the real thing (eg; p94, 95) Worse still, many photos are so dark or small, it seems quite pointless to have included them (eg; p89, 106, 174, 176, 178) And what is the point of squashing twelve photos on less than half a page (p14)that are supposed to display re-enactors in action, loading and firing a cannon? They should have been much bigger and each photo accompanied by text describing what was happening in each one. Thankfully, there are some nice touches to counteract the endless amount of cold metal on display, such as images of artillery crews manning their guns (eg: p27,85,144,145,270) and I really liked the illustration of Italian mountain artillery p167) However, even with these images, there is a definite lack of the human factor in this title, no feeling or heart for the actual mortals that had to move, load, fire and die with their guns; a factor that makes Mr. Kiley's title on the same subject so readable and welcoming. If you have no Osprey Artillery titles and own a magnifying glass, then this could be considered a welcome title to your shelf. But the quantity of photos do not equal quality. They suggest a rush job, while the canister blunder suggests either bad editing or a lack of true research. Saying that, it will still make an acceptable companion to other titles on the topic.
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