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eBook One Hundred Days : The Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander ePub

by Sandy Woodward

eBook One Hundred Days : The Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander ePub
Author: Sandy Woodward
Language: English
ISBN: 0007134673
ISBN13: 978-0007134670
Publisher: Harpercollins Pub Ltd; 2nd edition (January 31, 2003)
Pages: 384
Category: Military
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 596
Formats: lrf doc docx txt
ePub file: 1998 kb
Fb2 file: 1701 kb

This book is of course Woodward's self-assessment and those seeking a more objective perspective on his competence will . Woodward gave them 5 days to accomplish the mission and in exactly 5 days the mission was done.

This book is of course Woodward's self-assessment and those seeking a more objective perspective on his competence will have to look elsewhere. It is understandable that Woodward would wish to minimise his many errors in the conduct of this conflict. The US Military watched and has spent quite a bit of time and talent making US Army Delta Forces and Navy SEALs the equal of the SAS. What this small group of men did for the landing was invaluable. Woodward admits the mistake of using the frigates as minesweepers, but at the time I think he had little choice.

One Hundred Days book. On 2 April 1982 Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands. This shows even at the commander level how the Fog of War prevails. 4. There was tension between the three commanders with London not providing a clear CoC. 5. Every person on a ship is equally vulnerabl. hen the ship moves forward, everyone moves forward.

One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander.

They were well received and were updated in 2003 and 2012 with updated recollections as well as responses to the memoirs and responses made by Commodore Michael Clapp Woodward died of a heart attack on 4 August 2013 in Bosham, West Sussex, England. Honours and decorations. One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander.

The mission of the Battle Group under the command of Rear Admiral Sandy Woodward presented a challenge that .

The mission of the Battle Group under the command of Rear Admiral Sandy Woodward presented a challenge that seemed all but insurmountable, and it was to require men of the highest calibre, professionalism and fortitude to carry it of. One Hundred Days is unique as a dramatic portrayal of the world of modern naval warfare, where equipment is of astonishing sophistication but the margins for human courage and error are as wide as in the days of Nelson; and it is unique, too, in its revelations of the mind of the commander involved in planning one of this century's most audacious ripostes to an unwelcome invader.

As Battle Group Commander, Admiral Sandy Woodward was the man in charge on the frontline. Download from free file storage.

book by Patrick Robinson

book by Patrick Robinson. This is an absolutely first-rate memoir by the man who led the British fleet to victory in the Falkland Islands War. Only 50 years-old when he was chosen to lead the battle group to recapture the islands in 1982 (hard to believe this gentleman is now 73!), Admiral Sir John F. "Sandy" Woodward was courageous and competent commander.

Admiral Sa Paperback -One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands. Brilliant book which lived up to it's reputation.

item 1 One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander-Admiral Sandy -One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander-Admiral Sandy. item 2 One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands. by Woodward, Admiral Sa Paperback -One Hundred Days: Memoirs of the Falklands. by Woodward, Admiral Sa Paperback. Last oneFree postage. Held my interest cover to cover. Best-selling in Non-Fiction.

The Memoirs of the Falklands Battle Group Commander. Many Britons considered Woodward the cleverest man in the navy. By Admiral Sandy Woodward with Patrick Robinson; Foreword by The Rt. Hon. Margaret Thatcher. French newspapers called him "Nelson. Margaret Thatcher said he was precisely the right man to fight the world's first computer war. Without question, the admiral's memoir makes a significant addition to the official record.

In these engrossing memoirs, Admiral Sandy Woodward, Task Force commander from the aircraft carrier Hermes, takes us from day one to day one hundred of the conflict; from sailing through the waters of the Atlantic with hopes of a political settlement fading, and war becoming.

In these engrossing memoirs, Admiral Sandy Woodward, Task Force commander from the aircraft carrier Hermes, takes us from day one to day one hundred of the conflict; from sailing through the waters of the Atlantic with hopes of a political settlement fading, and war becoming increasingly likely, to the repulse of the Argentinian navy and the daring amphibious landing at San Carlos Water.

The bestselling, highly-acclaimed and most famous account of the Falklands War, written by the commander of the British Task Force. On 5 April 1982, three days after the invasion of the Falkland Islands, British armed forces were ordered to sail 8,000 miles to the South Atlantic unaware of what lay ahead of them or whether they would be committed to war with Argentina. In these engrossing memoirs, Admiral Sandy Woodward, Task Force commander from the aircraft carrier Hermes, takes us from day one to day one hundred of the conflict; from sailing through the waters of the Atlantic with hopes of a political settlement fading, and war becoming increasingly likely, to the repulse of the Argentinian navy and the daring amphibious landing at San Carlos Water. The war, which cost the lives of over 1,000 men, has left a legacy of many historical debates and controversies, from the sinking of ships such as HMS Coventry, HMS Sheffield and Sir Galahad, and the Argentinian cruiser, the Belgrano, to wider issues such as what was it like to command and fight a modern air and naval war, the biggest naval action since World War II? 'One Hundred Days' is unique as a dramatic portrayal of the world of modern naval warfare, where despite the use of sophisticated equipment and communications, the margins for human error and courage were as wide as they were in the days of Nelson.
Coidor
I had purchased the book and it set on a shelf until the death of the death of former Prime Minister Thatcher. At this time I decided to read the book.

In 1982 it was a rather close run affair that the British had retaking the Falklands from the Argentinian Military. The book starts with the low point of the British campaign - the sinking of HMS Sheffield - and then the book follows in chronological order until the Falkland's campaign. It was quite good and entertaining. At no point is the story slow. However, some parts are a lot faster than others. When the British task force is covering the Royal Army & Marines landing the results sort of reminds a casual reader of WWII: aircraft are lost and ships sunk at quite a rate. Admiral Woodward makes the observation that in the warfare the rate of ship to aircraft loss is about 10 Argentine aircraft to one ship, be it Frigate or Destroyer.

Admiral Woodward fights his forces and does an excellent job in the placement. The destroyers protect the carriers and in turn the carriers' aircraft of Harriers and Helicopters protect the fleet. Of particular note was observations of the British Missile Systems and the Type 42 Destroyers. The Type 42s were too wet in any seas, surprising for a British ship, and this affected the weapons systems. In many instances the weapons would not work because they were somewhat damaged by lack of protection in rough sea conditions. The two missile systems, Sea Wolf and Sea Dart, never quite performed to specifications and must have seemed very perplexing to both American & Soviet Observers at the time.

While the loss of Sheffield can be seen as the low point in the campaign the turning point is done by the British SAS. Every day they would attend the briefings and offer Admiral Woodward little. Then when he openly worried about being attacked by Argentinian fighter bombers the SAS said they could take them out. Woodward gave them 5 days to accomplish the mission and in exactly 5 days the mission was done. The US Military watched and has spent quite a bit of time and talent making US Army Delta Forces and Navy SEALs the equal of the SAS. What this small group of men did for the landing was invaluable.

Woodward admits the mistake of using the frigates as minesweepers, but at the time I think he had little choice. Additionally, while the British submarines are useful for checking the larger Argentinian Navy it's surprising they have limited stalking ability. With the exception of the nuclear power plants and some communication gear the sonar and sensor systems are not greatly improved from the prior WWII era and stalking the Aircraft Carrier 25th of May becomes extremely problematic in Woodward's view. He worries quite a bit about being caught in a pincer-attack like the American Navy was at the Battle of Guadalcanal in late 1942. The sinking of the Argentinian light cruiser - General Belgrano - removed the possibility of being caught in a pincer. Indeed, the Argentinian Brooklyn class cruiser had more firepower than the whole of Woodward's frigates and Destroyers. Still, he would have rather the submarines sunk the carrier 25th-of-May because the A-4 attack jets, operating from land bases, sank at least one of his ships.

This is an honest book with a good commander who expects the best of his subordinates. He is honest with his mistakes. He praises his men and talks about the defaults in his equipment. He views the U.K. as having been extremely lucky to have a good friend in the US government - which gave the British 100 war winning AIM-9L missiles and the Argentine government's poor timing as having invaded six months prior to the scheduled decommissioning of the ships that won the war.

This is a five star book on the last British colonial war. The men who fought it were truly the type of men who built the empire. Conversely, one sees too much modern media at play, such as when the BBC tells the Argentinian military the bombs were set incorrectly for the fuses and the BBC announces the time of an attack. It's amazing a few of the soldiers didn't get personal revenge on the writers and editors at the BBC.

I enjoyed this book and how a good commander helps defend one of the last British colonies. America would do well with such a government.
SlingFire
I couldn't put it down. The author provided huge insight into this fascinating war. How military commanders ever manage to fight wars in the face of all the interference from politicians is a mystery. "Win this war but our way. We aren't generals or admirals but we know best". When I finished I sat back and thought, here is another reason to be grateful that Margaret Thatcher was Prime Minister at the time. Had any other person been in office at the time other than Churchill, we all know whose flag would be flying over Port Stanley today.
The author describes the planning and execution in a way that is easy for non-military people to understand, gives masses of credit to others when it's due, and lambastes politicians (even well-meaning ones like Alexander Haig) when they deserve it. Which is often.
Ndyardin
This fine naval autobiography takes us behind the scenes of the Falklands sea/air (not ground) war and modern battle management in general. Admiral Woodward didn't exactly know what he was sailing into back in 1982, and makes no attempt to hide his personal sense of vulnerability as Britain's first fighting admiral in high-tech warfare. In fact, the entire book is refreshingly down-to-earth. Woodward is quick to note that he was tapped for the job because he happened to be the navy's closest flotilla commander at the time (in Gibraltar)--and confides that his superiors almost replaced him with a higher-ranking officer even as he led the task force into danger. This is no stuffed-shirt memoir.
Woodward and co-author Patrick Robinson weave accounts of grand strategy and military politics through a genuinely absorbing narrative of men and machines in heavy weather, incessant tactical maneuvering, and flashes of terrifying combat. Along the way, there are plenty of 'what-if's to chew on. We learn that Woodward had to manipulate London to get HMS Conqueror to sink the Argentine cruiser General Belgrano (British subs weren't under his tactical command). He explains why the sinking was both necessary and tragic, and how Conqueror watched but spared Argentine ships coming to Belgrano's aid. He also reveals that his ships almost shot down a Brazilian airliner mistaken for a pesky Argentine recon jet; he personally gave the order to withhold fire. And Woodward's character shines through his account of ordering HMS Alacrity on a potential suicide mission to scout mines--in an exceptionally gracious mea culpa of command, he praises the captain's sterling courage while faulting his own mundane direction.
Also fascinating are the individual stories of the high number of British ships damaged or sunk, and Woodward's frustration with underperforming anti-aircraft and anti-missile systems. This was more of a close call than the world knew at the time, as he makes abundantly clear. Ultimately, his modest approach on paper belies the fact that he and his task force pulled off a truly impressive naval feat. And it's a credit to Woodward the author-analyst that 'One Hundred Days' transcends the Falklands War to give an illuminating, first-person view of campaign and tactical battle coordination. It could find a home on bookshelves of Fortune 500 executives as well as students of naval and air operations. The style is also breezy (and occasionally humorous) enough for the casual reader. I've never seen it in a U.S. store, so thanks, Amazon.
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