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eBook Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Modern Warfare ePub

by John B. Alexander

eBook Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Modern Warfare ePub
Author: John B. Alexander
Language: English
ISBN: 0312194161
ISBN13: 978-0312194161
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; 1st edition (April 15, 1999)
Pages: 256
Category: Military
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 857
Formats: lrf doc txt mbr
ePub file: 1659 kb
Fb2 file: 1944 kb

Non-lethal weapons are a pragmatic application of force, not a peace . Nonlethal weapons in TwentyFirstCentry Warfare Part IV The Issues. Future War is the first comprehensive book written by an expert in the field of non-lethal armaments

Non-lethal weapons are a pragmatic application of force, not a peace movement. Ranging from old rubber bullets and tear gas to exotic advanced systems that can paralyze a country, they are essential for the preservation of peace and stability. 159. Nonlethal weapons in TwentyFirstCentry Warfare Epilogue. Future War is the first comprehensive book written by an expert in the field of non-lethal armaments. Colonel Alexander participated in the landmark Council on Foreign Relations study of non-lethal weapons and chaired the first major conferences on the topic.

Non-lethal weapons" may sound like an oxymoron, or something found only on Alice in Wonderland battlefields. John Alexander's FUTURE WAR gives us a definitive look at emerging non-lethal weapons technology. In reality, however, they are important security tools for armies and law enforcement officials (think tasers and tear gas). Colonel Alexander draws on his years of experience in law enforcement and as a Special Forces soldier as well as his work in weapons development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He gives us more than fascinating descriptions of exotic gadgetry and its applications.

Read Future War by John B. Alexander, P. Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Future War explains exactly how non-lethal electromagnetic and pulsed-power weapons, the laser and tazer, chemical systems, computer viruses, ultrasound and infrasound, and even biological entities will be used to stop enemies. These are the weapons of the future. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

John B. Alexander (born 1937) is a retired United States Army colonel. An infantry officer for much of his career, he is best known as a leading advocate for the development of non-lethal weapons and of military applications of the paranormal

John B. An infantry officer for much of his career, he is best known as a leading advocate for the development of non-lethal weapons and of military applications of the paranormal. He has written and lectured on the reality of UFOs. He characterizes his career as having "evolved from hard-core mercenary to thanatologist".

Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Modern Warfare. Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Modern Warfare. By John B. Alexander and Tom Clancy. John B. The nature of warfare has changed!

He developed the concept of Non-Lethal Defense at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and his work has brought him into contact with the Director of Central Intelligence and members of Congress, White House, and National Security Council staff. As NATO became interested, he served as a US representative on three international studies. The nature of warfare has changed!

Nonlethal weapons War Forecasting Law enforcement. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Nonlethal weapons War Forecasting Law enforcement. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site.

Read "Future War Non-Lethal Weapons in Modern Warfare" by John B. The nature of warfare has changed! Like it or not, terrorism has established a firm foothold worldwide. The nature of warfare has changed! Like it or not, terrorism has established a firm foothold worldwide

Article excerpt The purpose of this book is to draw attention to the use of nonlethal .

Alexander, John B. Future War: Non-Lethal Weapons in Twenty-first Century Warfare. New York: St. Martin's Griffin, 1999. The purpose of this book is to draw attention to the use of nonlethal weaponry in future warfare scenarios. Throughout the book, Alexander focuses the reader's attention on some of the more critical issues of the appropriate use of nonlethal weaponry in the . arsenal and, in so doing, demonstrates that new weaponry is needed to respond adequately to new and emerging types of conflict.

The nature of warfare has changed! Like it or not, terrorism has established a firm foothold worldwide. Economics and environmental issues are inextricably entwined on a global basis and tied directly to national regional security. Although traditional threats remain, new, shadowy, and mercurial adversaries are emerging, and identifying and locating them is difficult. Future War, based on the hard-learned lessons of Bosnia, Haiti, Somalia, Panama, and many other trouble spots, provides part of the solution.Non-lethal weapons are a pragmatic application of force, not a peace movement. Ranging from old rubber bullets and tear gas to exotic advanced systems that can paralyze a country, they are essential for the preservation of peace and stability. Future War explains exactly how non-lethal electromagnetic and pulsed-power weapons, the laser and tazer, chemical systems, computer viruses, ultrasound and infrasound, and even biological entities will be used to stop enemies. These are the weapons of the future.
Bine
As times have changed, our military has found itself increasingly involved in "military operations other than war", specifically humanitarian & peacekeeping operations. To accomplish these missions, our forces need to tailor their responnse to the mission, the threats and the situation at hand. Carpet bombing a village in World War II might have been a tactically acceptable option. Today it would be a war crime. This book gives readers insight on on the technologies being used to give the theater commander the means to tailor that response. It provides a way for our forces to deal with a hostile sutuation without excessive casualties or property damage. It gives an option between doing nothing, and using deadly force, and as such is a worthwhile reade for anyine interested in this technology.
Rarranere
John Alexander's FUTURE WAR gives us a definitive look at emerging non-lethal weapons technology. Colonel Alexander draws on his years of experience in law enforcement and as a Special Forces soldier as well as his work in weapons development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He gives us more than fascinating descriptions of exotic gadgetry and its applications. He explains how a convergence of political and technological factors gave rise to new threats and how non-lethal weapons can counter these threats while reducing loss of human life (and minimizing adverse political and public relations consequences). He tells us about the origins, evolution, and capabilities of these weapons and how they can be used singly and in combination to thwart bad guys, rescue victims, and send loud, unambiguous messages to decidedly unfriendly governments.
Colonel Alexander's descriptions of actual and hypothetical applications are relevant and engaging: stopping a saboteur from poisoning millions of Americans, rescuing students held hostage by gunmen in a suburb of Denver, destroying the infrastructure of an unfriendly Central European government, and toppling troublesome dictators. Indeed, because they are so compelling, one wonders if these "hypothetical" scenarios are entirely fictional. There's plenty of material for nail-biters: home made bombs and land mines, grisly tortures and massacres; chemicals of incredible lethality; warheads delivering unstoppable combinations of deadly diseases to sleeping cities.
Alexander is no Pollyanna. He views non-lethal weapons as supplements to, rather than replacements for, our conventional arsenal. He does not pretend that non-lethal weapons never cause fatalities, but he does convince us that these are minimal, compared to those caused by conventional weapons. Alexander recognizes that some of these weapons are expensive and many will remain outside of the reach of the average police department, and he cautions that without considerable training these weapons will not be deployed properly. Furthermore, he acknowledges that as presently enacted, some of our laws and treaties may make it difficult to deploy certain non-lethal weapons. He gives us a particularly penetrating analysis of how some of these weapons run afoul of public opinion. (The same person who doesn't mind pounding the enemy to smithereens with artillery may be reluctant to accidentally blind an enemy soldier with a laser.)
This book is strongly endorsed by many prominent, high-ranking military officers. No doubt, some of their favor was shaped in part by Colonel Alexander's reputation as a professional solider and his hard work in behalf of national defense. But these endorsements also reflect the fact that Alexander has done a great job of presenting a very controversial multi-faceted topic. He treats non-lethal weapons as SYSTEMS that are dependent upon international politics, law, public opinion, and strategic and tactical considerations as well as "gee whiz" technology. Alexander tells a very difficult and important story about science and people, and we should rejoice that this story is available to the general public.
THOMAS
As US/Allied forces this very day are engaging in military operations against Iraq, the emphasis is not only on victory but on the minimization of casualties, both military and civilian. This book discusses several approaches to the latter, via the use of "non-lethal" weapons, and some of these may in fact be employed in Operation Iraq Freedom. The discussion is fascinating, and one can only hope that future technological developments will make war less probable because of the ideas expoused by the author. In the foreword to the book, the author lets Tom Clancy remind the reader of the unique American viewpoint on warfare. Americans, because of the nature of the government in which they have chosen to create and participate, have always been reluctant to go to war. Every soldier is precious, indeed, human life is precious, and is not to be taken lightly. It is therefore not a surprise that precision-guided and non-lethal weapons have and are undergoing intense development in the last two decades in the United States. Hopefully this attitude will continue in this, the best of all centuries. The author seems confident that it will, and indeed we are fortunate to have individuals in the U.S. military who have his attitude and share his philosophy.
Some of the more interesting technological developments in non-lethal weaponry discussed in the book include: 1. Electromagnetic weapons: man-portable laser weapons, blinding weapons, isotropic radiator weapons, pulse weapons, stun guns. 2. Chemical non-lethal weapons: antimateriel chemical agents, superacids, pheromones. 3. Acoustic weapons, such as pulsed periodic stimulus, which causes perceptual disorientation in the individual.
Conjuril
A scary look at how wars are fought without public knowledge. Call it silent weapons for silent wars.
Alexander seems to have a close friendship with Gordon Novel. Novel revealed even more about the
weapon capabilities of our Hosts.
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