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eBook Catherine of Siena : The Dialogue (Classics of Western Spirituality) ePub

by Catherine of Siena,Suzanne Noffke,Guiliana Cavallini

eBook Catherine of Siena : The Dialogue (Classics of Western Spirituality) ePub
Author: Catherine of Siena,Suzanne Noffke,Guiliana Cavallini
Language: English
ISBN: 0809122332
ISBN13: 978-0809122332
Publisher: Paulist Press (April 1980)
Pages: 398
Category: World
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 532
Formats: rtf mbr mobi azw
ePub file: 1554 kb
Fb2 file: 1124 kb

As a young adult, she devoted herself to prayer, fasting, and mortifications. After this period of solitude, with its accompanying ecstatic visions, she went out into the world to care for the sick and the poor. Catherine also worked to bring peace and unity in the Church and among Christians. St. Catherine of Siena’s (1347-80) The Dialogue was composed as a continuous narrative (later divided up into chapters) with the regular pattern of petition, response, thanksgiving that characterizes the flow of the work (Introduction, p. 15).

Catherine of Siena is one of the outstanding figures of medieval . Paulist Press (Classics of Western Spirituality), 1980. The Dialogue of St. Catherine of Siena, TAN Books, 2009.

Catherine of Siena is one of the outstanding figures of medieval Catholicism, by the strong influence she has had in the history of the papacy and her extensive authorship. ISBN 978-0-89555-149-8.

The classics of western spirituality. By suzanne noffke, . preface by giuliana cavallini. translation of St. Catherine of Siena's Dialogue is for me to revive emo­ tions long past and never forgotten. A Library of the Great Spiritual Masters. President and Publisher. PAULIST PRESS NEW YORK, RAMSEY, TORONTO Cover Art The artist, JOSEPH TREPICCIONt, studied illustration and advertising at Paier School of Art in New Haven, Connecticut, receiving a post-graduate scholarship for further study there. It a l l h a ppened in Washington, . in J a n ua ry 1 965.

The Dialogue, by Catherine of Siena, is the crowning spiritual work of the only woman other than Theresa of Avila to. .Church and the souls of all who came under her influence.

The Dialogue, by Catherine of Siena, is the crowning spiritual work of the only woman other than Theresa of Avila to be granted the title of Doctor of the Roman Catholic Church. This volume was simply called 'my book' by the fourteenth-century Italian saint. Professor Noffke goes on to call The Dialogue 'a great tapestry to which Catherine adds stitch upon stitch until she is satisfied that she has communicated all she can of what she has learned of the way of Go. Catherine of Siena: Dialogue (Classics of Western Spirituality) (9780809122332) by Catherine of Siena.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Cavallini is director of the Centro Nazionale di Studi Cateriniani in Rome. Библиографические данные.

ST CATHERINE OF SIENA DIALOGUE 1 of 6 - Продолжительность: 42:46 Sacred Heart .

ПАПА это вам не МАМА!

Catherine of Siena book. Saint Catherine of Siena, .

Catherine of Siena book. Dec 22, 2015 James rated it it was amazing. She also worked to bring the papacy of Gregory XI back to Rome from its displacement in France, and to establish peace among the Italian city-states.

Informationen zum Titel Catherine of Siena von Suzanne Noffke aus der Reihe Classics of Western spirituality .

Informationen zum Titel Catherine of Siena von Suzanne Noffke aus der Reihe Classics of Western spirituality Professor Noffke goes on to call The Dialogue a great tapestry to which Catherine adds stitch upon stitch until she is satisfied that she has communicated all she can of what she has learned of the way of God. In this, the sixth centenary of the great Dominican's death, we live in a time so badly in need of her sense of institutional reform as flowing from Divine truth, love and charity.

The Dialogue (Classics of Western Spirituality). by Catherine of Siena, Saint, Suzanne Noffke, Guiliana Cavallini. Published April 1980 by Paulist Press.

By Catherine of Siena, Suzanne Noffke. By Catherine of Siena, Suzanne Noffke. It was also a great century for mysticism. But while her Dominican contemporaries in the north- Meister Eckhart, John Tauler, Henry Suso-were caught up in the speculative, Catherine's impact was inherently practical.

Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), mystic and doctor of the church, wrote The Dialogue, her crowning spiritual work, for "the instruction and encouragement of all those whose spiritual welfare was her concern."
Made-with-Love
Saint Catherine of Siena was a third order Dominican in fourteenth-century Tuscany. As a young adult, she devoted herself to prayer, fasting, and mortifications. After this period of solitude, with its accompanying ecstatic visions, she went out into the world to care for the sick and the poor. Catherine also worked to bring peace and unity in the Church and among Christians. She was canonized by Pope Pius II and declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope Paul VI. St. Catherine gives us one of the great literary treasures of the Church, called “The Dialogue.” It was for this work and her letters, Saint Catherine was named Doctor.

Saint Catherine’s insights are pertinent to today’s Church, especially in the Spiritual Life. For instance, she instructs us on:
—specific stages in the Spiritual Life.
—the notion of “mystical marriage” and what it means.
—how our journey in the Spiritual Life reflects Jesus on the Cross.
—how to overcome “selfish sensuality” by hatred of sin and growth in virtue.
—that trials, temptations, and sufferings can be transformed into positive things.
—how “filial love” and love of God eventually leads to “spousal love.”
—and, much more, even the four distinct punishments experienced by those in Hell!

These are all found in The Dialogue, which takes the form of actual conversations between God and Saint Catherine, and comes to us in four separate exchanges. Briefly, there is a “Treatise on Divine Providence” in which is explained the connection between love and suffering, emphasizing that God wants only our love and the service we give to our neighbors. The “Treatise on Discretion” introduces the metaphor of “The Bridge” between our fallen world and heaven, which is Jesus—similar to seeing Jesus as “The Way!” The “Treatise on Prayer” gives instructions for the progress from vocal to mental prayer, and describes the higher degrees of prayer. The “Treatise on Obedience” covers the necessity and rewards of obedience.

As with the writing of other Doctors and spiritual writers in this series, this is a message that comprises: taking our own steps towards spiritual perfection, whereby God wants to bring us to sanctity and salvation. This is a message completely true to Sacred Scripture. This profound teaching is a gift to guide the reader to apply these extraordinary ideas and teachings to his or her own life that they might arrive at the same benefit and spiritual growth envisioned by the Saint.

Highly recommended!
Marg
Fantastic book. My mom bought a cheaper version from a different publisher and totally regretted it. Hers was completely unformatted. This one is broken into chapters, spaced like a normal book and has paragraphs and the font is a readable size. Mom's cheaper book, also sold on Amazon, not so much. Definitely get this one. It's soooooo chock full of completely mind blowing explanations of deep theology that you'll want to go slow, just to absorb it, but it's fascinating enough that you might not want to put it down.
Rich Vulture
St. Catherine of Siena’s (1347-80) The Dialogue was composed as a continuous narrative (later divided up into chapters) with “the regular pattern of petition, response, thanksgiving that characterizes the flow of the work” (Introduction, p. 15). This is a difficult read (even in this very accessible translation), one not meant to be plowed through in the manner I read it, but to be ruminated over slowly in the manner of lectio divina.

The Dialogue includes passages on the importance of prayer and the image of Christ as a bridge. At the very outset of the book, St. Catherine, following St. Paul (1 Thess 5:17), advocates for continual, humble prayer (p. 25). She gives additional attention to this idea of humility in prayer later in the book, where God says, “Then she receives my visitation humbly, saying, ‘Behold your servant: Let your will be done in me.’ Then she emerges from the course of prayer and my spiritual visitation with spiritual gladness and joy, in humility considering herself unworthy…” (pp. 133-4). St. Catherine gives special importance to mental prayer, not that “one should abandon vocal prayer, since it seems not everyone is drawn to mental prayer…” (p. 124). Rather, one should, even in vocal prayer, endeavor “to concentrate on my love, pondering at the same time her own sins and the blood of my only-begotten Son” (p. 124). The target of this love is, of course, Jesus, whom St. Catherine gives various appellations, including Bridge (p. 59ff.), Vine (p. 61), Boat (p. 70), and Servant (p. 76). The Bridge image is one that she returns to many times. Christ is the bridge between our humanity and the Godhead. This is another way of referring to the Incarnation, but St. Catherine also uses the image to indicate a path to unity with God: the three steps of (1) desire without selfish love, (2) enlightenment of the mind, and (3) peace and quiet (pp. 65, 108).

On of the ideas that really struck me was St. Catherine’s exhortation to focus on your neighbors’ needs and on your sins, but not on your neighbors’ sins (p. 300). How often do we look to find fault in others rather than, in all humility, examine our own sinfulness! “But I gave you your ears to listen to my word and pay heed to your neighbor’s needs” (p. 300). We perversely gravitate towards condemning others instead of reaching out to help our brothers and sisters in charity and humility. This is contrary to the Gospel, and yet so many of us who identify ourselves as Christians find judgment easier than love.

This long, often meandering, book occasionally felt like a penance to read! St. Catherine’s exaltation of the spiritual over the physical (soul good; body bad) seemed a little too much like Gnosticism at times. And her exhortations not to engage civil law in matters involving wrongdoing by church ministers (p. 229) doesn’t resonate today in a post-scandal Church. But St. Catherine otherwise gives us much food for contemplation in lectio divina, including the importance of personal humility, the need to pray constantly, and the call to service.
Unirtay
It does not have the Imprimatur or Nihil Obstat. The words flowed like silk for me when I read it. I believe it is unabridged or none of the chapters are missing. This is God the Father talking directly to St. Catherine while she is in a state of ecstasy and supposedly the words in this book are what her secretaries wrote down. Profound amount of knowledge in here. Example: Humility is the foster mother and nurse of charity while patience is the heart of charity/divine love.
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