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eBook Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon (Public Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa) ePub

by Lucia Volk

eBook Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon (Public Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa) ePub
Author: Lucia Volk
Language: English
ISBN: 0253355230
ISBN13: 978-0253355232
Publisher: Indiana University Press (October 21, 2010)
Pages: 272
Category: World
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 295
Formats: azw lrf txt mobi
ePub file: 1261 kb
Fb2 file: 1463 kb

This compelling and lucid study enhances our understanding of culture and politics in the Middle East and the . Lucia Volk is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Co-director of Middle East and Islamic Studies at San Francisco State University.

This compelling and lucid study enhances our understanding of culture and politics in the Middle East and the politics of memory in situations of ongoing conflict.

Start by marking Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon as Want to Read . This compelling and lucid study enhances our understanding of culture and politics in the Middle East and the politics of memory in situations of ongoing conflict.

Start by marking Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Memorials and Martyrs begins with a thorough introduction in which Volk brings into conversation studies of ritual spaces, public art, and memory with nationalism, sectarianism, and religious self-sacrifice. The book presents a gripping tale of the work and contestation that her cians, artists, historians, restorationists, journalists, grassroots organizers, and victims’ descendants-have put into the design, building, destruction, and disappearance of memorials over the last five decades.

Probably the most basic reason behind the absence of a general treatment of resource allocation in modern computer systems is an adequate model for program behavior

DOI: 1. 307/41496406. Cite this publication. Probably the most basic reason behind the absence of a general treatment of resource allocation in modern computer systems is an adequate model for program behavior. In this paper a new model, the working set model, is developed

Culture as History and Landscape: Hizballah’s Efforts to Shape an Islamic Milieu in Lebanon. Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon.

Culture as History and Landscape: Hizballah’s Efforts to Shape an Islamic Milieu in Lebanon. Arab Studies Journal 19 (1): 10–41. In Popular Housing and Urban Land Tenure in the Middle East, eds. Myriam Ababsa, Baudouin Dupret, and Eric Denis, 137–168. Cairo: American University in Cairo Press. Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Volk, Lucia.

Most notably, the popular uprisings dubbed the Arab Spring have roiled the region, affecting every country there in one way or another

Most notably, the popular uprisings dubbed the Arab Spring have roiled the region, affecting every country there in one way or another. The region also has been affected in recent years by the continuing challenges posed by radical Islamist movements, severe geopolitical tensions, high oil prices, the global recession, and the steady advance of globalization

Everyday Sectarianism in Urban Lebanon: Infrastructures, Public Services, and Power (Princeton Studies in Culture . A highly readable and informative book for the student of the Middle East and refugee studies in general. Journal of Islamic Studies).

Everyday Sectarianism in Urban Lebanon: Infrastructures, Public Services, and Power (Princeton Studies in Culture and Technology). Gabiam’s nuanced study of Syria’s Palestinian community is an engaging and informative read. Journal of Palestine Studies). The Politics of Suffering should earn a place on syllabi of courses in applied anthropology and the anthropology of the Middle East as well as the anthropology of migration.

The Demographics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region show a highly populated, culturally diverse region spanning three continents. As of 2018, the population was nearly 578 million. The class, cultural, ethnic, governmental, linguistic. The class, cultural, ethnic, governmental, linguistic and religious make-up of the region is highly variable. Debates on which countries should be included in the Middle East are wide-ranging

Lucia Volk Department of Anthropology San Francisco State University. Mapping Lebanon’s Ethno-Religious Communities.

Lucia Volk Department of Anthropology San Francisco State University. Martyrs Memorials in Modern Lebanon: Representing the National through the Ethno-Religious.

Lebanese history is often associated with sectarianism and hostility between religious communities, but by examining public memorials and historical accounts Lucia Volk finds evidence for a sustained politics of Muslim and Christian co-existence. Lebanese Muslim and Christian civilians were jointly commemorated as martyrs for the nation after various episodes of violence in Lebanese history. Sites of memory sponsored by Maronite, Sunni, Shiite, and Druze elites have shared the goal of creating cross-community solidarity by honoring the joint sacrifice of civilians of different religious communities. This compelling and lucid study enhances our understanding of culture and politics in the Middle East and the politics of memory in situations of ongoing conflict.

Soustil
"Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon" shows the contradictions that are inherent with the Lebanese construct. Lebanon was created for political purposes, just as the rest of the region after the Sykes- Picot agreement, and later after World War II.
The book covers several events and the ensuing memorial spaces, describing the physical aspect as well as the political and social story. This makes the book interesting to a large audience: Middle East scholars, political science enthusiasts, as well as architects and designers, as it explains the creation of the successive memorial spaces. Up till now there was no extensive recounting of the many hurdles and the decision-making process behind these spaces. Unfortunately the story line does make Lebanon appear schizophrenic - but if this is the reality of what happened, then it is what it is, and we are allowed to draw our own conclusions.
The saddest fact is to realize that most of the dead in Lebanon's various episodes of war - whether civil war or war with another country - have been civilians and not soldiers.
Lebanon is the land of my paternal ancestors. This book is very personal to me, as I lived in Lebanon for nine (non-consecutive) years and was attending the Lebanese University's Institute of Fine Arts, very close to Martyr's Square, when the 1975 civil war started. The book has helped me better understand Lebanon's history, and more accurately its story, in the past 100 years, and reconcile the threads of my own memory.
I especially appreciated the reason behind the book: to dispel the notion that Middle Easterners are stuck in the past, constantly revisiting century-old grievances. The Middle East had of course its share of strife and bloodshed, but there were long periods in which not only Christians and Muslims, but also Jews, coexisted harmoniously.
Tolrajas
Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon reads with the draw of a horrific heartfelt documentary. Middle Eastern scholar Lucia Volk introduces us to the politics of memory from her knowledge as a political anthropologist. The well placed memoir-like details of how she got to the topic and respected the complexity of what she learned frames her well researched respectful narrative.

I didn’t read many of the footnotes, but I was very impressed by Volk’s personal research during her many trips to Lebanon where she spoke with selected people about their views, intentions, and actions related to the context of her subject of sacred memorials. As a San Francisco architect, with little knowledge of Lebanon, I found the text, photos, and illustrations engaging and easy to grasp…the way history should be.

How the public statues were designed and decided on by political elites was fascinating. Volk reports on several sites and cemeteries in different parts of Lebanon, a country smaller than Connecticut, bordered by Israel to the South, Syria to the East and North and the Mediterranean Sea to the West. “With eighteen minority religious communities… the Lebanese have organized themselves into ethno-religious identities.” She argues forcefully about the concern to respect diversity, to unify, to build nationness in Lebanon starting in 1916, by boldly including both Muslims and Christians, rather than separating them in the location of memorials, the character of the statues of martyrs, and in the events of commemoration.

Although Beirut is remembered by many as the Paris of the Middle East, perhaps because of its Golden Age (1959-1974), Volk’s cultural history makes me think that Martyrs Square in Beirut, which looks like a long and narrow public place, rather than a square one, on the map she includes, has symbolic memory as an urban public space for everyday users as well. People get attached to their public places and feel loss when they are abused or destroyed. How the public squares she reports on were conceived by political elites was eye-opening, and could be expanded to include the viewpoint of everyday users.

I think that when politically unhappy members of the public attacked the political statue in Lebanon, it may have been because they had very few visible public places to express their feelings and opinions. People want to be heard and respected. Autocratic political elites and world leaders do not provide many outlets for these voices. Public spaces are in decline. The spaces built do not seem to include many benches, or round shapes of steps with stages or other architectural features for public gatherings, speeches, postings, protests, or peaceful discussions. In her account, public art is talked about more than the urbanism for the collective memory of future values, however she references others Middle Eastern Scholars’ writings and invites more study.

Once I had finished reading the last page, I returned to the introduction, where I was able to absorb more of the message densely presented there. As Volk says, the choices that were made after the wars to cope with grief, and how opinions about what values that needed to be remembered, according to the political elites of the time, were crafted and changed over time. As I was reminded lately, culture has no fixed borders.

The hard hitting waves of political violence in Lebanon, from colonial powers, hostile neighbors, and internal factions, some linked to the foreign interests of Israel, Syria, and the United States, as well as other forces such as the impact of large numbers of refugees from Palestine, famine, rigid social laws, and resulting economic turmoil, shape a heart wrenching history.

Volk’s straight forward style of writing made the record an engaging smooth read: a Lebanese history lesson worth knowing. This is a slice of Middle Eastern reality I was glad to learn.

Wendy Bertrand, Architect
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