lind-peinture
» » Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany

eBook Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany ePub

by Henry Friedlander,Horst Biesold

eBook Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany ePub
Author: Henry Friedlander,Horst Biesold
Language: English
ISBN: 1563682559
ISBN13: 978-1563682551
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press; 1 edition (March 26, 2004)
Pages: 208
Category: World
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 253
Formats: rtf lrf docx lrf
ePub file: 1993 kb
Fb2 file: 1812 kb

Horst Biesold’s Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany. I first read the book on the medical holocaust in Germany by Dr. Friedlander

Horst Biesold’s Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany. His book covers a story that has remained almost unknown. In the United States. Friedlander. This book was originally a dissertation, however, Gallaudet Press and the translater, William Sayers, did a great job in turning what would be a dry dissertation into a short, but interesting book.

Horst Biesold’s Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany. Among those designated by this law as congenitally disabled were deaf people. Horst Biesold’s newly translated book examines this neglected aspect of Nazi racial hygiene through interviews with more than 1,000 deaf survivors of this brutal law that authorized forced sterilizations, abortions, and eventually murder.

Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany. Gallaudet University Press. The Racial State: Germany 1933-1945. Cambridge University Press.

Horst Biesold Crying Hands . Horst Biesold s Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany.

Horst Biesold Crying Hands - Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany. Price for Eshop: 1056 Kč (€ 3. ).

A questionnaire was sent out by Horst Biesold, author of Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi .

A questionnaire was sent out by Horst Biesold, author of Crying Hands: Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany. It was revealed that of those who responded, 1,215 people admitted to being sterilized between 1933 and 1945. Their ages ranged from nine to fifty years old, with 18% of them being between the ages of twenty-two and twenty-five. In Nazi Germany many people were forced into sterilization by Nazis who believed in race purity and their right to enforce it. Between 1933 and 1945 roughly 15,000 deaf people were forced into sterilization. The youngest victim being only 9 years old, nearly 5,000 children up to the age of 16 were sterilized.

Horst Biesold's Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany. In the United States, even in Germany, few are aware that during the Nazi era human beings-men, women, and children-with impaired hearing were sterilized against their will, and even fewer know that many of the deaf were also murdered. His book covers a story that has remained almost unknown

Horst Biesold's Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany.

Horst Biesold has dedicated his book to this forgotten category of Nazi victims. Biesold's monograph fills a gap in the historiography of Nazi eugenics. This book is important, given that one of the numerous legends cultivated in Germany after 1945 was that educators of the deaf, and physicians generally, had protected their patients from the grasp of Nazi racial hygiene cleansing.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Crying Hands : Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany. For Sale is a brand new version of Crying Hands Eugenics and Deaf People in Nazi Germany by Horst Biesold and is ready for immediate shipment.

Horst Biesold’s Crying Hands treats a neglected aspect of the Holocaust: the fate of the deaf in Nazi Germany. His book covers a story that has remained almost unknown. In the United States, even in Germany, few are aware that during the Nazi era human beings–men, women, and children–with impaired hearing were sterilized against their will, and even fewer know that many of the deaf were also murdered.--From the Foreword by Henry Friedlander When the Nazis assumed power in Germany in 1933, they wasted no time in implementing their radical policies, first by securing passage of the Law for the Prevention of Offspring with Hereditary Diseases. Among those designated by this law as “congenitally disabled” were deaf people. Horst Biesold’s newly translated book examines this neglected aspect of Nazi “racial hygiene” through interviews with more than 1,000 deaf survivors of this brutal law that authorized forced sterilizations, abortions, and eventually murder.      Crying Hands meticulously delineates the antecedents of Nazi eugenics, beginning with Social Darwinism (postulated in the mid-nineteenth century) and tracing the various sterilization laws later initiated throughout the world, including many passed and practiced in the United States. This exceptional scholarship is movingly paralleled by the human faces fixed to the numbing statistics, as in story after story those affected recount their irretrievable loss, pain, and misplaced shame imposed upon them by the Nazi regime. Through their stories, told to Biesold in German Sign Language, they have given voice to the countless others who died from the specious science practiced by the Third Reich. And now their own trails finally have been acknowledged.
DART-SKRIMER
I first read the book on the medical holocaust in Germany by Dr. Friedlander. I then came across this one in my search for more material having to do with the Deaf in Germany. This book was originally a dissertation, however, Gallaudet Press and the translater, William Sayers, did a great job in turning what would be a dry dissertation into a short, but interesting book.
Horst Biesold is an interpreter who in the performance of his job, came across members of the German deaf community who were finally willing to tell their story about being forced to undergo sterilization. He writes with obvious concern for and about his deaf clients, and the emotional and psychological impact that the eugenics laws had on these people. It is with concern and dismay that I am researching the same subject only in the United States, since the Nazis often wrote that many of their ideas and programs were first proffered by eugenicists in the U.S.
This book is a good reminder that when societies don't stand up for what is right, even when it does not directly affect most individuals, you cannot tell how far the 'slippery slope' is going to go. The Holocaust did not just become the Final Solution for the Jews, but included the gypsies and the disabled, and those who were considered 'life unworthy of life.' With the completion of the Human Genome Project, and proponents of euthanasia getting more vocal, and doctors like Kervorkian, and HMOs who put their bottom line before the worth of people...it is all too possible that this horror could happen again, and in this country. I urge ethicists, physicians, and educators to read this book as well as members of the deaf/disabled community so that we can protect ourselves from those who would put less value on our lives for whatever reason. Karen L. Sadler, Science Education, University of Pittsburgh
Blackbeard
great book!
Grosho
A great read for anyone who wants to work or be involved in the deaf community. Very well written and it's an attention grabber. Be warned that it can be sad at times just like anything about world war 2
Chi
It was doing good so far.
Nuadora
This little book, a nicely translated academic effort that is quite readable, demonstrates the depth of the idea that those who are rendered surperflous are being set up for death. This notion first expressed by Richard Rothstein sweeps across issues of race and nation, and into questions of ablity/disability, perhaps now the most obscured of the social issues that must be addressed by those who seek a more democratic, egalitarian, and civil way of life. The idea that inclusion means ALL, has not reached into the mind-sets of too many on the left, an odd circumstance since many fine efforts like the text at hand show that the old saw, An Injury to One only Goes Before an Injury to All, is quite true. This is a good book for educators, activists, and researchers in all fields.
Sarin
I picked this book out at random from the "Deaf Education" section of my university library. It was a slow read as it was emotionally draining. It is well written, clear, and thorught provoking. A must read for those interested in Deaf history, eugenics, and the right to life.
Malarad
This book is a remembrance of what was and tells of the pain and suffering of the German Deaf Community under the leadership of the Third Reich. I read this book, not as a hearing person, but as a Deaf person and I felt there pain. This book is horrifying but more so was the persons who were involved in the Deaf community who helped this government succeed to there sick ideas. Crying Hands reaches out from the darkness to shed light on one chapter in the history of our Deaf people and of our struggle over centuries of oppression. This books value is in it history; Deaf Holocaust History. I recommend this book for everyone.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only