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eBook Subversive Virtue: Asceticism and Authority in the Second-Century Pagan World ePub

by James A. Francis

eBook Subversive Virtue: Asceticism and Authority in the Second-Century Pagan World ePub
Author: James A. Francis
Language: English
ISBN: 0271034254
ISBN13: 978-0271034256
Publisher: Penn State University Press; 1 edition (April 15, 2008)
Pages: 240
Category: World
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 818
Formats: mobi lit mbr rtf
ePub file: 1291 kb
Fb2 file: 1941 kb

Evans which appeared in the Canadian Journal of History

Evans which appeared in the Canadian Journal of History.

Subversive Virtue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Much attention has been devoted in recent years to Christian asceticism. Start by marking Subversive Virtue: Asceticism and Authority in the Second-Century Pagan World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Subversive Virtue: Asceticism and Authority in the Second-Century Pagan World. University Park, P. Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995. Joseph W. Trigg (a1). Christ Church, Port Tobacco ParishLa Plata, Maryland.

Similar books and articles. Asceticism and Authority in the Roman Empire: Society, Culture, and Deviance in the Second Century . Asceticism and Monkhood in the Ancient World and in the Early Church. Edgar Hösch - 1970 - Philosophy and History 3 (2):211-211. James A. Francis - 1991 - Dissertation, Duke University. Asceticism - Finn Op Asceticism in the Graeco-Roman World. The Ascetic Imperative in Culture and Criticism. Geoffrey Galt Harpham - 1987 - University of Chicago Press. Poverty and Asceticism (Vol. 2 No. 4,2014). Evental Aesthetics - 2014 - Evental Aesthetics 2 (4):1-107. Response IV-Asceticism and Authority.

Accordingly, James Francis turns to the second century, the "balmy late afternoon of Rome's classical . Finally, Francis points out striking parallels between the conflict over pagan asceticism and its Christian counterpart.

Accordingly, James Francis turns to the second century, the "balmy late afternoon of Rome's classical empire," when the conflict between asceticism and authority reached a turning point. The Stoic Aurelius saw ascetic self-discipline as a virtue, but one to be exercised in moderation.

Subversive Virtue : Asceticism and Authority in the Second-Century Pagan World.

Students of asceticism in the Roman world generally pass over the .

Students of asceticism in the Roman world generally pass over the second century. The Antonine period has never quite recovered from being chosen by Edward Gibbon as the happiest age in the human history, and asceticism is a symptom of stress in society. He undoubtedly possessed authority, and here Francis is on strong grounds: Apollonius is a precursor of the Christian holy men and stylite saints who admonished emperors and acted as ombudsmen in their communities. Pagan society in the second century was aware of the subversive power of the ascetic, Francis argues, and thus they conceptualized Jesus in familiar terms.

Ascetic ideology and practice, as well as their Francis, . Subversive Virtue: Asceticism and Authority relationship to each other, are rich ijields for schol- in the Second-Century Pagan World, University Park, arly inquiry. Asceticism is an appealing object of 1995. study also because it polarizes religious adherents, Freiberger, O. (e., Asceticism and Its Critics: Historical especially in its more extreme forms.

Much attention has been devoted in recent years to Christian asceticism in Late Antiquity. What is Kobo Super Points? A loyalty program that rewards you for your love of reading. Explore rewards Explore Kobo VIP Membership.

Much attention has been devoted in recent years to Christian asceticism in Late Antiquity. But Christianity did not introduce asceticism to the ancient world. An underlying theme of this fascinating study of pagan asceticism is that much of the work on Christian "holy men" has ignored earlier manifestations of asceticism in Antiquity and the way Roman society confronted it. Accordingly, James Francis turns to the second century, the "balmy late afternoon of Rome's classical empire," when the conflict between asceticism and authority reached a turning point.

Francis begins with the emperor Marcus Aurelius (121–180), who warned in his Meditations against "display[ing] oneself as a man keen to impress others with a reputation for asceticism or beneficence." The Stoic Aurelius saw ascetic self-discipline as a virtue, but one to be exercised in moderation. Like other Roman aristocrats of his day, he perceived practitioners of ostentatious physical asceticism as a threat to prevailing norms and the established order. Prophecy, sorcery, miracle working, charismatic leadership, expressions of social discontent, and advocacy of alternative values regarding wealth, property, marriage, and sexuality were the issues provoking the controversy.

If Aurelius defined the acceptable limits of ascetical practice, then the poet Lucian depicted the threat ascetics were perceived to pose to the social status quo through his biting satire. In an eye-opening analysis of Philostratus's Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Francis shows how Roman society reined in its deviant ascetics by "rehabilitating" them into pillars of traditional values. Celsus's True Doctrine shows how the views pagans held of their own ascetics influenced their negative view of Christianity. Finally, Francis points out striking parallels between the conflict over pagan asceticism and its Christian counterpart. By treating pagan asceticism seriously in its own right, Francis establishes the context necessary for understanding the great flowering of asceticism in Late Antiquity

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