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eBook Nice Big American Baby ePub

by Judy Budnitz

eBook Nice Big American Baby ePub
Author: Judy Budnitz
Language: English
ISBN: 0007122047
ISBN13: 978-0007122042
Publisher: HarperPerennial (April 27, 2004)
Pages: 304
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humor
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 582
Formats: azw mbr docx mobi
ePub file: 1888 kb
Fb2 file: 1185 kb

Judy Budnitz dares make the genre of allegory palatable again by stretching her metaphors to absurd lengths

leaves us breathless, astonished and more than a little bit awed. Miami Herald Budnitz’s collection is jarring, humane, funny, and so lively it practically buzzes. Judy Budnitz dares make the genre of allegory palatable again by stretching her metaphors to absurd lengths. In "Where we come from," the first in this excellent collection of short stories, a mother's need to provide the best for her son leads her to delay giving birth until he can be born in the right place - and even then she can't let go.

Budnitz’s stories are so incredibly different - so inspired - that it’s a little disorienting. In After, Budnitz writes of a couple that adopts a seemingly perfect child who is plagued by a mysterious face that visits him at night. You’ll need to come up to breathe between these tales, or else you may just drown in their lyricism and remarkable grasp of plot and imagination. The child is aloof towards his parents, and we are shown the deep, maternal pain of the mother, longing for her son to need her, physically and emotionally. To her surprise, she found the bottom sheet damp.

Flying Leap was a New York Times Notable Book in 1998

Flying Leap was a New York Times Notable Book in 1998. Budnitz is also the author of the novel If I Told You Once, which won the Edward Lewis Wallant Award in the United States and was short-listed for the Orange Prize in the United Kingdom. She lives in San Francisco.

Nice Big American Baby book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. A blazingly original, profoundly moving new work of fiction.

Nice big American baby. Nice big American baby. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-ElisaR on August 24, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Judy Budnitz (born 1973) is an American writer. She grew up in Atlanta, Georgia, attended Harvard University, was a fellow at Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and in 1998 received an MFA in creative writing from New York University. If I Told You Once (1999). Nice Big American Baby (2005). The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror Twelfth Annual Collection (1999). The Better of McSweeney's Volume One - Issues 1 -10" (2005). The Best American Non Required Reading" (2006).

Judy Budnitz, author of the Orange Prize shortlisted novel If I Told You Once and the critically acclaimed collection Flying Leap. Nice Big American Baby - Judy Budnitz. creates her own brand of stark, dystopian reality in this impressive collection of blisteringly inventive and surreal new stories. Budnitz's first-person narrators are pitch perfect, helping the reader to see from their perspective, no matter how odd it might be. Clever, comic and perpetually surprising, these are stories that demand to be read again and again. A truly talented young writer.

About Nice Big American Baby. A blazingly original, profoundly moving new work of fiction by a writer whose world–and imagination–knows no boundaries

About Nice Big American Baby. A blazingly original, profoundly moving new work of fiction by a writer whose world–and imagination–knows no boundaries. I don’t know what planet Judy Budnitz comes from, said Newsweek on the publication of her fiction debut, Flying Leap, but I’m happy to have her. Tremendous. funny, dark, adventurous, slanted, and enchanted

Nice Big American Baby Judy Budnitz. Unforgettable and utterly affecting. You can’t turn the pages fast enough’ Dave EggersJudy Budnitz, author of the Orange Prize shortlisted novel If I Told You Once and the critically acclaimed collection Flying Leap.

Nice Big American Baby Judy Budnitz. creates her own brand of stark, dystopian reality in this impressive collection of blisteringly inventive and surreal new stories

Judy Budnitz has created masterpieces. In Nice Big American Baby, this still young writer makes a big comeback, after some five years, and brings the whole genre of short fiction with her.

Judy Budnitz has created masterpieces. These stories are explored with lucid themes and magical depth. Be warned these are not nice stories of the naturalist kind, say a mother and daughter who learn to apreciate each other through talk and by staring at oaks. They are viscious, powerful stories that pack all the punch of, well, a lot of punches.

`Unforgettable and utterly affecting. You can't turn the pages fast enough' Dave Eggers Judy Budnitz, author of the Orange Prize shortlisted novel If I Told You Once and the critically acclaimed collection Flying Leap. creates her own brand of stark, dystopian reality in this impressive collection of blisteringly inventive and surreal new stories. Budnitz's first-person narrators are pitch perfect, helping the reader to see from their perspective, no matter how odd it might be. Clever, comic and perpetually surprising, these are stories that demand to be read again and again. `A truly talented young writer.' Times
Jorius
Judy Budnitz dares make the genre of allegory palatable again by stretching her metaphors to absurd lengths. In "Where we come from," the first in this excellent collection of short stories, a mother's need to provide the best for her son leads her to delay giving birth until he can be born in the right place - and even then she can't let go. Compared to this, the shenanigans of parents trying to get children into "feeder" nursery schools seem downright sane.

The anxiety of motherhood runs through the best of the stories in this collection. In addition to "Where we come from," the teasingly titled "miracle" (first published in The New Yorker) describes a situation in which the normal ambivalence of new parents is magnified by a decidedly unusual child.

For Budnitz, motherhood is the flip side of daughterhood: "Where we come from" starts with the mother as young daughter. "Flush," perhaps the best in the collection, is a straightforward, poignant story of the intertwined fates of mothers and daughters, while "Visitors" examines the gap and alienation (perhaps literally) between them. And "Motherland," which begins as a thought experiment about "an island of mothers," suddenly transforms into an evocative wish to transcend the roles we are assigned as daughters - and sons.

The weakest stories in the collection explore the consequences of motherhood gone wrong - the Big Spoiled American Baby. "Nadia" highlights the ego- /ethno-centrism of the Baby when she's all grown up, but it soon veers too far into caricaturing the unsympathetic narrator. "Elephant and boy" suffers from a similar weakness in exploring a similar theme. On the other hand, "Preparedness," featuring the President as Big Baby, successfully repackages tired hippie sentiments into a gentle fairy tale.

Not fitting neatly into any of the above categories are two meditations on artistic endeavor: "The kindest cut," which has a certain old-world charm, and the melancholy "Saving face," one of my favorites.

Budnitz's vivid imagination makes these stories fun to read, but it's her observations about the human condition - our vanity, our anxiety, and also our morality - that make them worth reading.
Yozshujinn
This was a fun read. If you enjoy strange and experimental writing I would recommend this book for you.
Akisame
she has a rich and smoky style that i just love. but her stories are for people that think in an artistic type of way. they are definitely creative and sometimes even creepy. but really great stories.
Nalmetus
It annoys me that the pieces have such strong beginings and weak ends. It's a buzz kill.
Hystana
A mixed bag of short stories. What one reviewer called "inventiveness" often strays into manipulation, pseudomysticism, and nonsense, yet there are several gems among these tales. Ms. Budnitz has a gift for language and understanding people. Maybe in the future she'll depend on those solid skills and get away from ventures into the bizarre.
Pryl
I really like the way Judy Budnitz writes. I picked up Flying Leap years ago and was hooked. She is one of those authors that when I go to a bookstore I look up to see if anything new is released. I don't know if she is for everyone though. Her stories tend to be highly . . . imaginative. They are almost like fairy tales, allegories that may or may not have a deeper meaning. To be honest, I've never really looked. Her writing is just so rich and full of flavor that I tend to just devour the stories in a sitting and not think about them later. Her writing has matured and "Nice Big American Baby" has a darker feeling than Flying Leap. I would even argue that it is darker than her novella, "If I told you once," which has its dark parts, but really straddles the space between Flying Leap and Baby. My favorite story by far in this collection is "Saving Face" a story about two people living in an imaginary authoritarian regime ruled by a benign Prime Minister. Perhaps it is a sign of her maturation as an author (or perhaps me as a reader) that I do keep this story percolating in my head going over themes of true love, devotion, happenstance, and self that play in this story. It is really very very good. "Visitors" is also a nice diversion wherein she uses an interesting flash-cut narrative routine that never gets boring or staid due to the fact that after each transition you are left wondering what NEW bizarre twist of dialogue or scenery she going to appear. You really can't go wrong with a Budnitz book so if you are looking for something of an interesting read I would highly recommend her.
Ucantia
This is one of the best collections of short stories I've read in a while. The settings and themes vary, but each has at least some element of magical realism. Many of them are creepy, not in a blood-and-guts horrorshow kind of way, but more in a strange, unsettling way. Many of them are sad; "Elephant and Boy" especially touched me. But there is also quite a bit of sly humor, as in "Sales," in which traveling salesmen in some future time are captured by a family and kept penned, and still continue their salesmen-like ways. One of my favorite stories in this volume was "Preparedness," an ultimately rather hopeful tale featuring a world leader who seems quite familiar.

Budnitz writes beautifully. Her writing is filled with interesting images, and yet she never forgets her characters and plots. These stories are rich but not dense. I can strongly recommend this book, and I look forward to reading more of Budnitz's work.
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