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eBook Bible Stories for Adults ePub

by James Morrow

eBook Bible Stories for Adults ePub
Author: James Morrow
Language: English
ISBN: 0156002442
ISBN13: 978-0156002448
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (February 28, 1996)
Pages: 243
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humor
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 372
Formats: lrf mbr rtf lit
ePub file: 1125 kb
Fb2 file: 1684 kb

Morrow unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit. Among the dozen selections is the Nebula Award-winning â?œBible Stories for Adults.

Morrow unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit.

Bible Stories for Adults book. Morrow unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit. Among the dozen selections is the Nebula Award-winning Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge. Contents: Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge (1988) Daughter Earth (1991) Known but to God and Wilbur Hines (1991) Bible.

James Morrow, the most provocative satiric voice in science fiction, unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit (The Washington Post). Among the dozen selections is the Nebula Award–winning story, The Deluge, in which a woman of ill repute is rescued by the crew of the ark, who must deal with the consequences of their misguided act of mercy. Also included is a follow-up to the Tower of Babel fable, an unprecedented nativity, and an attempt to stand so-called creation science on its head.

20: The Tower BEING GOD, I must choose My words carefully. People, I’ve noticed, tend to hang on to My every remark. God the Father and all that. But an effective mom, dad, or Supreme Being is not necessarily a permissive mom, dad, or Supreme Being. Spare the rod, and you’ll spoil the species. Sometimes it’s best to be strict. Among the dozen selections is the Nebula Award-winning "Bible Stories for Adults, No.

Bible Stories for Adults. Short fiction of biblical proportions-and bent-from the science fiction satirist and author of The Godhead Trilogy. James Morrow, the most provocative satiric voice in science fiction, unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit (The Washington Post).

Электронная книга "Bible Stories for Adults", James Morrow. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Bible. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Bible Stories for Adults" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Bible Stories for Adults also makes a great introduction to the reader starting out with James Morrow, as it is. .

Bible Stories for Adults also makes a great introduction to the reader starting out with James Morrow, as it is lighter in tone and easier to digest than his (equally excellent) novel-length works. Quality collection of short stories. Published by Thriftbooks. Simply put, the stories contained in this book are EXCELLENT!

Bible Stories for Adults, No. 31: The Covenant by James Morrow. The survivors beseech Moses to remember the commandments, but he can conjure nothing beyond, You will have no other gods except me. Desperate, they implore YHWH for a second chance. And YHWH replies: No. Thus is the contract lost.

Most of Morrow’s oeuvre has been published as science fiction and fantasy, but he is also the author of two unconventional historical novels, The Last Witchfinder and Galápagos Regained. He variously describes himself as a "scientific humanist," a "bewildered pilgrim," and a "child of the Enlightenment".

Morrow unabashedly delves into matters both sacred and secular in this collection of short stories buoyed by his deliciously irreverent wit. Among the dozen selections is the Nebula Award-winning �Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge.�
Folsa
great price and fine product - all I had hoped for
Hi_Jacker
This not heavy stuff, but it is all entertaining. The bible would be more readable if Morrow had written it.
from earth
These are not the Bible stories one expects to hear. In fact, there is one about Helen of Troy, and several that take place in the modern world, and wry allusions to modern events as well as ancient ones. There are also interpretations of Biblical happenings that would produce unexpected results. You can't learn much about the Bible from this book, so I was disappointed here, but in itself it is worthwhile reading. A funny book!
fabscf
Morrow does indeed revisit some classic tales from the Hebrew scriptures, but the "Bible stories" he retells here involve the sacred (as in sacred cow) more generally. In his sights are such unassailables as God, the Unknown Soldier, Darwin's theory, and masculinity itself. Given that these stories, according to the title, are for "adults," one should not be surprised to be thrilled, shocked, and even offended by some of the author's jibes, yet each shot he takes is precisely aimed and well-deserved. Every story in this book was entertaining; several were masterfully crafted thought-provoking works suitable for extended rumination and discussion.

In the first story, Nebula-winning "Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge," we observe along with our prostitute protagonist that, "When I destroyed my unwanted children, it was murder. When Yahweh did the same, it was eugenics." Morrow simply applies a single moral standard to the old tale of Noah and the Ark, to wicked effect. "Known but to God and Wilbur Hines" tells the story of a murderous, racist deserter who, through a twist of fate, enjoys a hero's burial and anonymous immortality in Arlington.

"Bible Stories for Adults, No. 20: The Tower" inverts the traditional telling of the Tower of Babel legend, so that instead of confusing the human race with a gibber of languages, God trips up humanity by allowing them to communicate "without the benefit of semantic doubt." "So My plan is working. Half the planet is now a graduate seminar, the other half a battleground." Morrow likewise turns the entire Intelligent Design debacle on its head in "Spelling God with the Wrong Blocks," a story in which science missionaries confront a race of androids who insist that they originated through natural selection, when in fact they were created as an experiment by Harvard sociobiologists. When the science missionaries try to explain the androids' error, they are tried as heretics for speaking against the Two Testaments...of Darwin, of course.

Morrow concludes the collection with the fantastic "Arms and a Woman." This story explores the life of Helen, lover of Paris and wife of Menelaus. When she discovers that the Greeks and Trojans have been fighting for a decade over her, she tries to win the peace by going back to her husband. But she has aged, and is now slightly less than launching-a-thousand-ships-beautiful, so the men don't want to hear it. That, and they really like the glory that comes from the battle. It turns out that Helen's abduction by Paris was really just an excuse. As the council of Greeks and Trojans explains to Helen, if they can make ten years of warfare over a single woman look rational, then men could make war over just about anything, and she wants to spoil all that fun. In Morrow's hands, the gentle anti-heroism of the feminine is lauded while the foundational epic of Western civilization is revealed as a work of a banal, baleful masculinity that has provided the rationale for millennia of braggadocio and pee-pee waving. Brilliant!
RuTGamer
"Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge"--Not for the squeamish, this retelling of the Flood touches on some of Morrow's recurring themes. Why is it murder when humans kill, but not when God kills? What is the value of life? How should we live our lives? I did not find this as disgusting as when I first read it, but I'm also 10 years older.
"Daughter Earth"--I've written about this story before, and it was a pleasure to reread it. It is one of my favorites--a strange metaphorical tale that has character, humor, and a biosphere. This is the kind of story I want to write when I grow up.
"Known But to God and Wilbur Hines"--Well researched tale of World War I and how war is hell. It is okay, but we have seen the sentiment elsewhere, and, while the details are sharp and fresh, the actual plot and manner are a tad warmed over.
"Bible Stories for Adults, No. 20: The Tower"--I like this one a lot better than "The Deluge," possibly because of the great humor inherent in a story narrated by God himself. Morrow has a real gift for merging humor into his satire, and this is a prime example. The story itself, with its criticism of Donald Trump and the hubris of the well-off, and its method of turning the tables on the idea of Babel, is just marvelous.
"Spelling God with the Wrong Blocks"--This is a fabulous story. I finished this and, as with "Daughter Earth," thought, "This is the kind of thing that I try to write. A story that transposes one set of beliefs into the reference frame of another set of beliefs to put serious question marks into both absolutes." In this one, natural selection is seen as the "correct" and holy interpretation of evolution, and when the science missionaries try to convince the planet of androids that instead they were actually the result of special creation, things don't turn out so well. God, what a funny, but not so funny, story. Check double plus, highly recommended, in my top 20.
"The Assemblage of Kristin"--Another great story, about an organ donor whose parts don't seem to want to give up life. Wonderful details, interesting characters, and a marvelous story structure. You know, if this book continues with stories like this, Morrow is going to move into real favorite status with me. Is this his only story collection (well, no, there was the Pulphouse Author's Choice one, but this is the only major publisher collection, I think)?
"Bible Stories for Adults, No. 31: The Covenant"--Like "Spelling God..." this drops us into a apotheosis wherein what we find normal is switched. Instead of having Moses' law for over 2,000 years, this world has had to go without it, instead preserving the shattered bits of clay from Mt. Sinai. The purpose of the computer they build is to put the tablets together again, to reveal the holy word. But is it worth it? Great social commentary. Question: What is the purpose of the numbers to these bible stores for adults? In this collection, there are only four, but the last is numbered 46. Are there 42 more that Morrow has not published?
"Abe Lincoln in McDonald's"--A little like the last story except the strange twist of having a very real Abe Lincoln in the future is almost too bizarre for words. The concept of slavery and society is always good for another story.
"The Confessions of Ebeneezer Scrooge"--Similar in style and substance to the Bible Stories, at least in that it picks grits with a story that ostensibly provides for modern morals. Morrow feels that greed shouldn't get off with just providing a turkey at Christmastime.
"Bible Stories for Adults, No. 46: The Soap Opera"--An examination of God's role in the life of Job. I'm reminded of XTC's "Dear God," and the line about how God has a lot of questions to answer about suffering. That's a great thing about the Bible Stories--the God of the Old Testament was so capricious that moving his actions into modern times make him look truly ridiculous. I was thinking that Morrow needs to tackle a New Testament story, but I guess that is what Only Begotten Daughter was about.
"Diary of a Mad Diety"--Great concept for a story--a man with the most extreme multiple personality disorder. And I liked several parts it this, but the latter third just did not seem. to match the inventiveness of the earlier parts.
"Arms and the Woman"--This is an example of the Iliad for Adults. What happens when Helen decides that she is not worth a war, a la Shaw. Nice idea, and the best part is the heroes over the truce table talking about how this is the war to make all war seem rational.
Arihelm
After reading this book, I place James Morrow in the same spot I hold for Joe Haldeman: favorite short-story writer. Simply put, the stories contained in this book are EXCELLENT! Morrow has a true economy of writing - he says so much with very few words, and his subject matter is very well chosen, most of the time taking a fresh look at historical events or Biblical stories.
I guess the majority of the stories vaguely qualify as science fiction, but each one has a profound message under its slight sci-fi trappings. Two definite stand-outs are "The Deluge", showing how evil remained in the world after the great flood (and making some nasty implications for the lineage of the human race), and "Arms and the Woman", a hilarious yet totally relevant retelling of the Trojan War from Helen's perspective. These two stories alone are worth the price of the book, but there's many more gems included. I'm still confused about the story concerning Job, but that's a minor detail; the others more than make up for it.
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