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eBook The Poor Mouth: Poor Mouth: A Bad Story about the Hard Life (Irish Literature) ePub

by Ralph Steadman,Patrick C Power,Flann O'Brien

eBook The Poor Mouth: Poor Mouth: A Bad Story about the Hard Life (Irish Literature) ePub
Author: Ralph Steadman,Patrick C Power,Flann O'Brien
Language: English
ISBN: 1564780910
ISBN13: 978-1564780911
Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; 1st Dalkey Archive ed edition (March 1, 1996)
Pages: 128
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humor
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 735
Formats: lit mbr doc rtf
ePub file: 1818 kb
Fb2 file: 1207 kb

In "The Poor Mouth," rather than take on a multitude of subjects as he handled so brilliantly in At Swim Two Birds . Patrick Power brought it into English in 1973. In spite of what seems a stellar job of translating, this is still a very foreign work.

In "The Poor Mouth," rather than take on a multitude of subjects as he handled so brilliantly in At Swim Two Birds," Flann O’Brien satirizes the Gaelic novels of the early 20th century that specialized in depicting Irish peasants in the depths of the most miserable, unhealthy, boggy, rural existence imaginable. His protagonist, the nobly named Bonaparte O’Coonassa, dwells among pigs and sheep in the worst poverty in the beautiful, but unlivable town of Corkodoragha.

The Poor Mouth book .

The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born. The Poor Mouth is one of O’Brien’s less meta-fictional novels although it definitely exceeds realism into a state of satire. It’s couched as the autobiographical story of one of the poorest Gaels in all of Gaeltacht, one Bonaparte O’Coonassa. I do not think that its like will ever be there again!.

An Béal Bocht (Irish: The Poor Mouth) is a 1941 novel in Irish by Brian O'Nolan (Flann O'Brien), published under the pseudonym "Myles na gCopaleen". An English translation by Patrick C. Power appeared in 1973. Stan Gebler Davies wrote: "The Poor Mouth is wildly funny, but there is at the same time always a sense of black evil

Ralph Steadman, Flann O'brien, Patrick Power. Place of Publication. A Game of Thrones: The Story Continues: The complete boxset of all 7 books (A Song of Ice and Fire) by George R. R. Martin, (227). 1. 9 New. £1. 0 Used.

Ralph Steadman, Flann O'brien, Patrick Power. General & Literary Fiction. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Fiction.

The Poor Mouth: A Bad Story about the Hard Life

The Poor Mouth: A Bad Story about the Hard Life. by Flann O'Brien · Patrick C. Power · Ralph Steadman. The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a cabin in a fictitious village called Corkadoragha in western Ireland equally renowned for its beauty and the abject poverty of its residents. Potatoes constitute the basis of his fami.

The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a cabin in a fictitious village called Corkadoragha in western Ireland equally renowned for its beauty and the abject poverty of its residents.

The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a. .Flann O'Brien, Patrick C. Power. O'Brien's wicked satire on the life of Irish peasant Bonaparte O'Coonassa was published in Gaelic in 1941 and translated into English in 1964.

The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a cabin in a fictitious village called Corkadoragha . Bibliographic information.

O'Brien, Flann, 1911-1966. New York : Viking Press. A Richard Seaver book. Translation of An béal boċt.

Short Fiction of Flann O'Brien (Irish Literature). 2. You've read other Irish books about the hard life. Peig" (shudder!) as an example.

The Poor Mouth" relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a cabin in a fictitious village called Corkadoragha in western Ireland equally renowned for its beauty and the abject poverty of its residents. Short Fiction of Flann O'Brien (Irish Literature).

The Poor Mouth relates the story of one Bonaparte O'Coonassa, born in a cabin in a fictitious village called Corkadoragha in western Ireland equally renowned for its beauty and the abject poverty of its residents. Potatoes constitute the basis of his family's daily fare, and they share both bed and board with the sheep and pigs. A scathing satire on the Irish, this work brought down on the author's head the full wrath of those who saw themselves as the custodians of Irish language and tradition when it was first published in Gaelic in 1941.
Mopimicr
In "The Poor Mouth," rather than take on a multitude of subjects as he handled so brilliantly in At Swim Two Birds," Flann O’Brien satirizes the Gaelic novels of the early 20th century that specialized in depicting Irish peasants in the depths of the most miserable, unhealthy, boggy, rural existence imaginable. His protagonist, the nobly named Bonaparte O’Coonassa, dwells among pigs and sheep in the worst poverty in the beautiful, but unlivable town of Corkodoragha. No misery is spared him, from the humiliation of being shamed in school and the town for only speaking Gaelic, to losing his wife and tiny, young son, carried off by disease on the same day, to being sent to prison for the rest of his life for a crime he didn’t commit. And if you just take the trouble to sit yourself down with a good pint of something with both your hooves shoved toward the fire, what a merry romp you’ll find the whole thing to be.
Tenius
This book is an inside joke, and a classic at that. It is a grand send up of professional Irish (both at home and abroad). As example, consider a book written in Gaelic making sport of the Gaelic movement by means of a Gaelic festival. ( In ourland of the professional ethnic festival, this might serve as an effective antidote to "Irish" nights and "Scots weekends.") If you are inclined to romanticize villages of the old sod dominated by pigs, mud, rain and potatos, avoid this work. If you want a great classic of the jaundiced eye school of literature, read this book. By the way, some of the fun lies in the many parodies of Irish literary works in the assorted chapters; knowledge of the genre helps.
Xwnaydan
A tongue in cheek telling of the tale of the rural West in Ireland. Read with a twinkle in your eye.
Still In Mind
"The Poor Mouth" was a gift. I never saw this particular edition. However, the friend I sent it to, said it was in very nice condition. Thank you. I have read the book before. It's a very funny satire on other books that are always putting on "the poor mouth," i.e. always describing things in the bleakest, most poverty-struck, disease-ridden way ("Angela's Ashes," for instance). It's a good laugh. I recommend the book to anyone who likes Celtic humour.
Foiuost
I wonder how close to the truth this satire is? The author's descriptions of poverty, hunger, alcohol consumption, and ignorance in Ireland are repeated in other literature. "Angela's ashes" comes to mind. This was a disturbing, provocative, excellent read.
lolike
This book is translated to English from the Irish language. It is an easy read. I was able to read the whole thing in a day, and I enjoyed it immensely.
Moonworm
Just read it.
The only 'con' I can think of is that it ended too soon.
This story was written in Gaelic and published in 1941. Patrick Power brought it into English in 1973. In spite of what seems a stellar job of translating, this is still a very foreign work. It is a story of the Gaels of the west of Ireland in an imaginary place where it always seems to be raining. The characters are rural poor who could not be called peasants, as they seem to raise but potatoes to fatten their pigs and keep themselves lean. Ralph Steadman's crude pencil illustrations do justice to the characters and their miserable climate and squalid habits.
The outside world, in the form of city people whose first language is English, is just trouble. It might take the form of 'friends' of the Gaelic language who descend on them with puzzling and degrading demands, or of brutal schoolmasters with no Gaelic and no patience, or the law, which can pluck someone away and lock him up for years without justification, or even explanation.
And always, there are the rain and the potatoes.
The book has some funny scenes, I suppose, although the humor would be called black if the whole atmosphere were not so gray. From my distance and ignorance I can imagine that the effect of this book, once it was translated, was to embarrass all of Ireland about its Gaeltacht. The misery of the people seems unrelieved, and their reason for being but to preserve the Gaelic heritage in a kind of cultural zoo. I don't know the current status of that area, nor the effect the book had, but I am curious.
The book takes place in an area not far from the Yeats country. In the Mythologies and the fairy tale collection, the peasantry seem not so bad off as here. I think I prefer Yeats.
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