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eBook Pride and Promiscuity : The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen [Parody] ePub

by Dennis Ashton,Arielle Eckstut

eBook Pride and Promiscuity : The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen [Parody] ePub
Author: Dennis Ashton,Arielle Eckstut
Language: English
ISBN: 068487265X
ISBN13: 978-0684872650
Publisher: Fireside; 1st edition (April 1, 2001)
Pages: 160
Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humor
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 131
Formats: mobi doc mbr mobi
ePub file: 1241 kb
Fb2 file: 1724 kb

The sex scenes Eckstut and Ashton have written - strange as it may sound - fit perfectly into the texts.

The sex scenes Eckstut and Ashton have written - strange as it may sound - fit perfectly into the texts. Reading (in bed) I think, "Yes, this IS the exact situation that would turn-on that character! That's exactly how she or he would act!" For example, in her sex scene with Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet is portayed as the feminist I know and love. Austen would have loved this witty and bawdy romp through her own novels. For those of you who read any of Austen's novels and wished the characters would just get over it (and get it on!), here's your very own release.

Pride and Promiscuity book. I don’t recommend Pride and Promiscuity. The premise is shaky and doesn’t hold up and worst of all, it’s just not funny. Eckstut and Ashton often quote preceding text from the novel (the actual novel) in italics, then insert the discovered sex scene where fictitious Austen scholars decided it was cut. Sometimes this works, but often it does not. The premise of this joke does not work.

Arielle Eckstut, Dennis Ashton. In a pitch-perfect literary parody, Arielle Eckstut and David Auburn claim to have stumbled upon lost manuscript pages from Jane Austen's novels, along with shocking letters to her sister and publisher. The 'excerpts' take readers behind closed doors to behold some very naughty goings-on among the characters of Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma and all of Austen's novels.

John Mullan on a new view of Austen in Arielle Eckstut's Pride and Promiscuity. So when Arielle Eckstut brings her ready imagination to conjuring the sex scenes that Austen was not able to provide, she can write as if this were homage rather than desecration

John Mullan on a new view of Austen in Arielle Eckstut's Pride and Promiscuity. So when Arielle Eckstut brings her ready imagination to conjuring the sex scenes that Austen was not able to provide, she can write as if this were homage rather than desecration. Eckstut, a literary agent from California who has, according to her press release, "written numerous articles about sex", proclaims herself an Austen devotee. In her gamely facetious Preface she pictures herself visiting a manor house in which the blessed Jane's sister Cassandra once stayed.

In 1999, two amateur Jane Austen scholars staying at an English estate stumbled upon a hidden cache of manuscript pages and made the literary discovery of the century - the lost sex scenes from Jane Austens novels. Published here for the first time, the lost pages display Emma taking self-satisfaction to a whole new level, and reveal Henry Crawfords thorough exploration of "brotherly love" at Mansfield Park.

Book Description: A brilliantly executed parody of Jane Austen's 'forgotten' sex scenes. About the Author: Arielle Eckstut is a literary agent living in New York City and San Francisco. Shipping: US$ . 0 Within . Destination, rates & speeds.

Written by. Arielle Eckstut. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york. Manufacturer: Fireside Release date: 1 April 2001 ISBN-10 : 068487265X ISBN-13: 9780684872650.

In 2002, an amateur Jane Austen scholar, while staying at a Hertfordshire estate, stumbled upon a hidden cache of manuscript pages and made an extraordinary literary discovery - lost scenes from Jane Austen's novels that reveal an altogether different dimension to her oeuvre. Pride and Prejudice's Bingley sisters appear as Sapphic seductresses; Mansfield Park's incest subtext becomes manifest; and Darcy gets more than his shirt wet. This incisive parody of academic study is sure to astonish and delight mischievous Austenites.

In 1999, two amateur Jane Austen scholars staying at an English estate stumbled upon a hidden cache of manuscript pages and made the literary discovery of the century -- the lost sex scenes from Jane Austen's novels. Published here for the first time, the lost pages display Emma taking self-satisfaction to a whole new level, and reveal Henry Crawford's thorough exploration of "brotherly love" at Mansfield Park. If you've ever wondered what really happened in the drawing rooms of Austen's beloved characters, Pride and Promiscuity will satisfy your curiosity...and a whole lot more.
Hystana
A naughty little book that made me laugh! Fabulous would recommend A++
Biaemi
stupid, not funny
Umge
Not my idea of a Jane Austen's spinoff. Dissapointing, sorry!
Mori
It's hilarious, a great addition to the library of any Austenite!
Kajishakar
I'm sorry I hated it! I bought something I thought would be different! I guess, maybe, I should have reviewed it more. I'm giving it three stars though, because although I hated it, it was well written and just OKAY. I wouldn't read it again though!
Coiwield
I was hoping to find this book amusing, and, well, I didn't. I pride myself on a fairly decent sense of humor, and I guess that if you're going to "go there" (as in, write up "lost sex scenes" from Jane Austen's novels) you might as well go all the way, and this book simply did not do so.
Mazuzahn
From the back of the book: In 2002, an amateur Jane Austen scholar, while staying at Hertfordshire estate, stumbled upon a hidden cache of manuscript pages and made an extraordinary literary discovery - lost scenes from Jane Austen's novels that reveal an altogether different dimension of her oeuvre.

This book, much like The Princess Bride, would have you believe that it's contents are legitimate; except that William Goldman really tricked me into thinking his story was real :| . Eckstut proves that her findings of Auten's lost manuscripts are legitimate by including a letter of approval from English professor, Elfrida Drummond, authoress of splendid works, such as Pride in Punctuation and Proof and Prejudice. Alas, dear readers, Jane Austen didn't hide away sex scenes that her publisher refused to allow into all six of her novels, but this book was still a quick, quirky little read.

There's nothing erotic (in my opinion) about this novel, so if you're looking for detailed intimate moments between Elizabeth and Darcy, per say, you should probably look elsewhere. The best thing about this book is that Eckstut did her best to stick to the language of Austen's time and the scenes felt almost authentic. I say almost for two reasons: the writing doesn't really have Austen's voice, and some of the scenarios are too ridiculous to be believed. Re: Miss Bingley and Hurst involved in a threesome with Jane Bennett to test her marital suitability to Bingley. Again, there's nothing vulgar or overly explicit in the details, but the themes are intended for adult readers.

Some scenes made me roll my eyes - primarily the one mentioned above, but others did make me chuckle. Re: Emma pleasuring herself to the thought of how useful she is to everyone in her life and "how essential she was to the flawless running of the household." At 145 pages I didn't feel like I wasted my time, and I actually wished it were a little longer. Eckstut had some very clever moments and I would have loved to see them further developed, especially the comedic aspects. This book didn't blow me away, but if you're open-minded and in the mood for a chuckle or two, check it out! If you're looking for hot and heavy Regency-era action, I'd say look elsewhere.
Arielle Eckstut told me that she wrote this book to turn Jane Austen on her ear. Well she did just that with Pride and Promniscuity. The book is a hilarious send-up of Austen's work, written perfectly in its style. The only difference is that Arielle's work is the "lost sex scenes". You might characterize this as "Jane Austen Meets Jackie Collins".
Arielle gives you a look inside Austen's head as to what might have happened if Austen was commissioned to write a romance novel in the style of her day. What was funny for me is that the book is written perfectly in the stodgy stuck up British Style and the sex scenes fit seamlessly into the mix. To see these scenes written in the same manner as the rest of the book gives them an almost surreal quality. They are almost as unreal as some of what happens in Austen's books.
Make no mistake. I am a big Jane Austen fan. I find her work fascinating and moving. But I laughed and laughed at this endeavor because it is so preposterous that it is hysterical. For example, just imagine Elizabeth and Marianne from Sense and Sensibility talking about fun with animals (I will leave you to your own devices on that). Or Jane Benett, Mrs. Hurst and Caroline Bingly...together. Or Mr. Collins being VERY bad and being punished. Or Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy...
You get the idea. This is not for the faint of heart. If you like Spinal Tap, The Rutles, Airplane and Mel Brooks, you'll love this book. And if you're and Austen fan with a sense of humor as I hope you are, you'll love it too....
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