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eBook Play the Najdorf: Scheveningen Style--A Complete Repertoire for Black in this Most Dynamic of Openings ePub

by John Emms

eBook Play the Najdorf: Scheveningen Style--A Complete Repertoire for Black in this Most Dynamic of Openings ePub
Author: John Emms
Language: English
ISBN: 1857443233
ISBN13: 978-1857443233
Publisher: Everyman Chess; 1st edition (October 1, 2003)
Pages: 192
Category: Puzzles & Games
Subcategory: Humor
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 987
Formats: lrf lit mbr docx
ePub file: 1218 kb
Fb2 file: 1735 kb

In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf

In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf.

In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf. The Najdorf is one of the most sharp, dynamic, and popular openings that Black can pla. Download (17MB). Sicilian Grand Prix Attack (Everyman Chess). Beating the Sicilian. The Queen’s Gambit Accepted: A Sharp and Sound Response to 1 d4. Play the Semi-Slav. The Hedgehog (Batsford Chess Book).

In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehe. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Play the Najdorf: Scheveningen Style: A Complete Repertoire for Black in this Most Dynamic of Openings as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Play The Najdorf: Scheveningen Style – A Complete Repertoire for Black in this Most Dynamic of Openings, John Emms, Everyman Chess, 2003. Apr 17, 2015 Will be going thoroughly through Emms book in about a month from now. donkeyfish87. Sep 18, 2015 I´ve recently been reading. Chess Developments: The Sicilian Najdorf . g5 by Kevin Goh Wei Ming. Excellent (albeit difficult, at least I think so) book, warmheartly recommended from my side

Synopsis: In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf

Synopsis: In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf.

In fact, many books exploring the Scheveningen today have Najdorf in the title. Play the Najdorf: Scheveningen Style-A Complete Repertoire for Black in this Most Dynamic of Openings (9781857443233): John Emms: Books". Retrieved 2012-01-12. This, continuing the line of thinking in the English section above, is technically the Najdorf Variation of the Sicilian defense with the very popular English Attack. Note that the "Modern" Scheveningen only covers lines without an early. The "Classical" Scheveningen includes the early.

In this book Grandmaster and opening expert John Emms produces a comprehensive but workable black repertoire against all of White's possible options in the Najdorf.The Najdorf is one of the most sharp, dynamic, and popular openings that Black can pla
Lbe
There are not many advanced chess books out there devoted solely to the Scheveningen Sicilian opening. So, it was nice to be able to even locate this one, although it is from 2003 - fifteen years ago - and now out of print.

This book is repertoire based and therefore does not attempt to be comprehensive. John Emms tends to use this same general approach in all of his books - after the basic moves just a few select key branches are explored. The book comes off as a causal stroll through basic illustrative games designed to give you the big picture as opposed to an intense drilldown into theory. The games provided are not the latest or cutting edge but rather are specifically chosen to illustrate a narrow repertoire path. None of what you see here attempts to be definitive - the author is providing a generalized and broad roadmap.

Pros:
You get only Scheveningen games. Most other opening books attempting to teach this material will tend to mix it up with both e6 Scheveningen and e5 Najdorf variations. Here you obviously just get Scheveningen. The only duplication would be Fisher’s Sozin variation where virtually all books universally recommend the e6 response. If you are only interested in the Sozin variation then the Georgiev and Kolev book (The Sharpest Sicilian 2012) is a far superior and more up to date survey of that particular variation versus what you will find here in Emm’s book. Therefore the value of Emms’s book for me was limited to just the second half where Emms covers non-Sozin variations. It is difficult to find books covering those particular variations with e6 instead of the standard e5.

Cons:
The book does explain key goals and plans at a generalized level in the intro sections. But in the illustrative games it is not always entirely clear as to what either side is actually trying to accomplish except in very general terms. You get the impression that this is just a “system” where the move order is not always set in stone. Once you get all the pieces out of the box, Emms is not always clear about the reasons for moves in terms of the overall goals - i.e. what you should be aiming for in the specific game on display. Part of this is likely due to the nature of and complexity of this dynamic opening, but I felt you are not always getting a real sense of what Black is supposed to be doing should the opponent make a move outside of book. Bottom line - while many readers seem to like John Emms as a chess teacher I personally thought he was only average and highly overrated.

Bottom line:
You are not “learning” the Scheveningen opening per se… and perhaps that is not a realistic goal for this complex opening!? Emms is not teaching the Scheveningen so much as just annotating individual games that happen to use a Scheveningen/Najdorf move order. If your opponent follows a slightly different move order then I feel that you are on your own in terms of knowing what to do next. For some students this sort of annotation approach is sufficient. I was looking to better understand the goals and themes of the opening itself - stuff like identifying key squares for your pieces - in the particular game at hand - and then a clear explanation of the follow up strategies and tactics once those placement goals are achieved. That is where I felt the analysis tended to be lacking at times. Regardless, I still found the book to be a worthily purchase.
Awene
"Play the Najdorf: scheveningen style" is great for people who like to play Scheveningen type positions, but want to avoid the dreaded Keres Attack (6. g4!?). This isn't a book you'll want to skim; you really have to work through the variations methodically to get the most out of it. Personally, I'm using this book as a starting point for my repertoire against the Open Sicilian because of the flexible move order (delaying the choice between e6 or e5, and whether to develop the Queen's Knight at d7 or c6).

For example, Emms tells the reader upfront that he plays 6.Bc4 as White, and his high opinion of this variation definitely shows. In the first chapter, he spends almost a full page detailing why 6.Bc4 is such an effective system, while 6.Be3 (considered the modern main line) only earned one paragraph. That section ended up convincing me that a Scheveningen set-up against 6.Bc4 is worth avoiding, so now I transpose into the Classical Sicilian with 7...Nc6 for plans based around Na5. Similarly, against most other lines, you can choose to stick with the Najdorf proper by playing 6...e5 instead of 6...e6 (effectively "Playing the Najdorf: Najdorf style"). It's really a matter of personal preference, and the flexible 5...a6 move order makes it possible.

The coverage of the 6.Be3 and 6.Be2 lines is very good. For me, this represents the core of my repertoire against the Open Sicilian. Much of it overlaps with D'Costa's book "The Sicilian Scheveningen: move-by-move." The two books complement each other well, because D'Costa uses a "full games" format that's helpful for seeing how typical Scheveningen positions unfold. The "variation tree" format of Emms's book is good for learning precise move orders, but not as helpful for getting a sense of the flow of the game.

I was a little disappointed with the repertoire choice against 6.Bg5 because it doesn't seem in the spirit of the Scheveningen. Emms recommends 6...e6 7. f4 Qc7, sometimes called the Kasparov variation. In the main line, White gives the second player a passive game and stodgy pawn structure with 8.Bxf6. Theoretically there's nothing wrong with 7...Qc7, but I think it deprives Black of the types of positions he's aiming for. Instead, Gelfand's 7...Nbd7 or even the "Old Main Line" 7... Be7 seem more consistent because they preserve the characteristic Scheveningen "small center" with pawns at e6 and d6.

Other reviewers have complained that there's not much discussion of general ideas and goals of the opening. I had that impression initially too, because the chapter introductions are short and there's no dedicated section talking about the different plans at Black's disposal. But upon studying the book I've found that that information is found within the text itself, where the ideas discussed in one line can apply to a lot of other similar positions. Emms consistently explains moves by referring to the imbalances in the position and general plans for both sides. To be clear, this isn't one of those annoying opening books that is satisfied with an analysis like "slightly better for White." For a more general discussion of Scheveningen ideas, check out D'Costa's "The Sicilian Scheveningen: move-by-move."

All in all, this is a good book for what it claims to be. It's not a full treatise on the Scheveningen-style Najdorf, giving an analysis of all options for both colors. Instead, it provides a grandmaster-level response for Black in the positions that you're most likely to come across in this opening. It's probably best suited for players 1700+ (FYI I'm currently about 1950), but I could imagine a 1500 player working hard and benefiting a lot. Highly recommended.
Rollers from Abdun
Still the best Sicilian Defense book available. All the recommended variations hold up against engine play, even against Houdini 5, Stockfish 8, and Komodo 10. The perfect answer to the dreaded English Attack.

You can always rely on John Emms. Highly recommended.
Xmatarryto
Since Kasparov, in our times aggressive players prefer to play Sicilian in Najdorf-Schveningen way. The reason is that this defence allows Black not only to equalise the game, and also to give attacking chances. I have personally a lot of books of John Emms, each of these is valuable than other. Because he knows very well how to deliver the issue, and where the cruciai points are. As I have written to John, to everymanchess, yesterday, he can write the same book in" My by Move.." style, which provides even the low ELO level players between 1400-1700 to learn and play this opening in their game.
Elizabeth
Grandmaster Emms does a commendable job in providing an ample slice of contemporary examples of master play to explain the primary strategic ideas for players of both the white and black pieces. The Scheveningen variation of the Sicilian Defense is arguably the most durable and least subject to fashion and fad of all of the semi-open variations. Emms is a seasoned grandmaster with an analgous mastery of the written word. For players attempting to decide how to play the Najdorf Sicilian, Emms' case is both sound and strong for adopting the a6, d6, and e6 pawn structure of the Scheveningen variation. As with any opening book, the student must build upon the lessons in this work by collecting and studying further high level game scores. This book is a fine template for that further study.
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